61

I'm having issues where I can't add files to my repository.

I'm using GIT on windows, in Aptana Studio for some Ruby development.

I've managed to push a few files up to GitHub, but then after this, everything's stopped working. I have for example a new sub-folder in my master directory, with 2 ruby files inside. If I call "git add .", and then "git status" and it keeps saying "working directory clean" and has nothing to commit.

I've tried "git add folder/myfile.rb" and still nothing.

Anyone any idea's what I can try?

  • 2
    Not joking, but try a restart of the machine – manojlds Sep 20 '11 at 19:57
  • It was some foolish mistake on my side, I'm using tortoise git and there is checkbox when you commit any changes, it was unchecked on my side and I have some new files locally only, so be careful with it! – BotanMan Jul 1 '15 at 9:37

19 Answers 19

117

I found myself in a similar situation as the poster:

If I call "git add .", and then "git status" and it keeps saying "working directory clean" and has nothing to commit.

But I had a different solution than what's here. Since I came to this first, I hope to save others some time.

From the above answers and what I've seen elsewhere, the usual fixes to this problem are:

  • Ensure there are actually saved changes on the file in question
  • Ensure the file doesn't meet your exclude rules in .gitignore and .git/info/exclude
  • Ensure you're not trying to add an empty folder. Git won't track those. Standard solution is to place a blank file named .gitkeep as a placeholder so git will track the folder.

In my case, I had originally tried to create a git repo around an existing repo (not knowing it was there). I had removed the .git folder from this sub repo a while ago, but I didn't realize that it was too late, and git was already tracking it as a submodule. You can read more about how these behave and how to remove them here, but

  • the solution for me was to simply run git rm --cached path_to_submodule.
  • 26
    Lifesaver! I simply had to type git rm --cached name_of_former_submodule and it got the path automatically. – leymannx Jun 17 '14 at 13:03
  • 4
    what is submodule – Muhammad Umer May 5 '16 at 0:56
  • how do I know if that's my problem? I don't know how to recognize that – PlayHardGoPro Dec 13 '17 at 16:08
  • @MuhammadUmer The submodule page of the official Git readme explains what they are in more detail. – zrisher May 14 '18 at 22:03
21

To add to the possible solutions for other users:

Make sure you have not changed the case of the folder name in Windows:

I had a similar problem where a folder called Setup controlled by Git and hosted on GitHub, all development was done on a Windows machine.

At some point I changed the folder to setup (lower case S). From that point on when I added new files to the setup folder they were stored in the setup folder and not the Setup folder, but I guess because I was developing on a Windows machine the existing Setup folder in git/github was not changed to setup.

The result was that I couldn't see all of the files in the setup in GitHub. I suspect that if I cloned the project on a *nix machine I would have seen two folders, Setup and setup.

So make sure you have not changed the case of the containing folder on a Windows machine, if you have then I'd suggest:

  • Renaming the folder to something like setup-temp
  • git add -A
  • git commit -m "Whatever"
  • Rename the folder back to what you want
  • git add -A
  • git commit -m "Whatever"
  • 5
    This happened to me with a file name as well. Using git mv -f newFileCase oldFileCase will correct the repository – Brian DiCasa Apr 11 '16 at 14:40
  • I had a case issue on osx, unfortunately even though it is a *nux file system it is generally set up as case-insensitive which can cause issues with *nux tools like git. – Pellet Nov 1 '16 at 7:34
  • Thanks, you saved my day – Ievgen Nov 1 '17 at 16:09
  • if you have pending changes in files with "same name" but with a different Case this might also cause the same problem – Mauricio Gracia Gutierrez Nov 16 '18 at 20:50
18

If the file is excluded by .gitignore and you want to add it anyway, you can force it with:

git add -f path/to/file.ext
13

Double check your .gitignore file to make sure that the file is able to be seen by Git. Likewise, there is a file .git/info/exclude that 'excludes' files/directories from the project, just like a .gitignore file would.

  • I'd also add to double check that the files aren't somehow "already added" or not... – rogerdpack Apr 2 '13 at 13:46
11

Odd, but I fought with git all night to add a file. Turns out it was already added. Git wasn't picking up my changes, as the changes weren't being saved, as the file was inaccessible by my account, and my IDE wasn't reporting this over SSH.

In short, check to make sure you don't have it already added to the repository.

8

Best bet is to copy your folder. Delete the original. Clone the project from github, copy your new files into the new cloned folder, and then try again.

  • This worked for me using git on CygWin and getting some "permissions out of order" messages. I didn't even need to clone and copy the changed files, I just duplicated the directory as it was. I think forcing Windows to re-write everything means that it corrects the permissions problems. – RoG Jan 24 '17 at 8:35
7

I just had this issue and the problem was that I was inside a directory and not at the top level. Once I moved to the top level it worked.

  • I'm sure I could have used git add .. or whatever required to get to the level under which my changes existed and it also would have worked. This is just a gotcha problem here (my user error). – gaoagong Feb 23 '17 at 21:55
4

I had this problem with the first program in the folder. I did "git add" then "git commit". "git status" gave the error described i.e. "nothing to commit, working directory clean"

I ended up deleting the .git file from the program folder. Then I did a new git init, git add and git commit and it worked.

  • For me it was the other way around. I was in a merge (rebase) conflict and I had to cd into the folder to git add the file. – LosManos Apr 26 at 19:46
3

How about the standard procedure:

git add folder
git commit

This will add the folder and all it's files with a single command.
Please note, git is not able to store empty folders.

If commit didn't worked, the first place you should check is probably .gitignore.

  • 6
    Please note, git is not able to store empty folders. TY! – Blundell Nov 22 '12 at 11:35
2

In my case the issue was enabled SafeCrLf option. I am on windows with tortoise git. After disabling the option adding the files was not an issue anymore.

2

Here you can find an answer to the same problem:

basically in this case the problem was the global_git ignore

2

Silly solution from me, but I thought that it wasn't adding and pushing new files because github.com wasn't showing the files I had just pushed. I had forgotten that the files I added were on a different branch. The files had push just fine. I had to switch from my master branch to the new branch in github to see them. Lost a few minutes on that one :)

1

It's impossible (for me) to add the first file to an empty repository cloned from GitHub. You need to follow the link README, that GitHub suggests to create. After you create your first file online, you can work normally with git.

This happened to me Nov 17, 2016.

0

I searched around for a while and ended up finding out I had blocked off the SSH port which was what caused the git add command to stop working. I ended up changing origin using https with the following command: git remote set-url origin [url-to-git-repo]

0

Another issue can be file permissions. Try issuing : chmod 755 file1

0

I know this is a really old question, but I know it can happen to someone as well, turns out I was working with a file named AUX.JS and thi is a reserved file name for windows, this produced the following error

fatal: unable to stat 'src/hoc/Aux.js': No such file or directory

so you can either remove the file or rename it, then it will work.

Final conclusion, in addition to all other valid answers, if you are in a windows machine look out for the output of the 'git add' command, it can also provide additional information.

0

Had the same issue with a repo that I cloned from SiteGround Git to my mac. The freshly cloned repo had a list of changed files that git status said needed to be added to the commit, but trying to add or checkout any of them didn't do anything at all.

For some reason there were case changes in the filenames (e.g. .jpg -> .JPG). The solution was to simply git mv the filename the OS was using to the name git was using, e.g.:

git mv File_That_Wont_Add.txt File_THAT_WONT_Add.txt
0

I recently experienced this issue on my computer running Windows 7. I am using the git command window interface. The solution was to be very careful about the case sensitivity of the file and directory names when doing the git add. Although git would not complain when the case did not exactly match the case of the Windows file system file and directory names it also would not add the files. There would be nothing to commit. Once I typed the file names with the exactly correct case they would be added and listed under the changes to be committed as I intended.

0

I was having this issue on Visual Studio, what worked for me was: 1- Right click on the added file that is not being recognized by git. 2- Select "Add excluded file to Source Control"

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