8

As far as I understand @property declares the getter and setter in the .h file and @synthesize implements the getter and setter in the .m files. Furthermore it is possible to write your own implementation for the getter and setter instead of using @synthesize.

So if we always need to implement the setter/getter why do we need to additionaly declare it? @property seems to be semantical redundant to me and a source for bugs.

What happends when I declare a @property but forget to implement it with @synthesize or manually? What happends when I use @synthesize and forget the @property declaration?

26

Properties are now synthesized by default, since Xcode 4.4, so yes, you are right, it was redundant and Apple removed the need to write both @property and @synthesize, just use @property from now on.

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  • nice that they added this. Thanks for the response – Stefan Arn Aug 8 '12 at 8:41
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    There is still one case where you will need to use both property and synthesize together. The compiler will use the property name plus the underscore prefix to create the ivar. If the ivar _propertyname collides with a private instance variable, you will need to synthesize it to a new ivar. For example: if you are subclassing the UIToolbar, and declares a property naming it delegate you will get a error trying to use the ivar _delegate because the UIToolbar contains a private instance variable id _delegate. You can solve this by using @synthesize delegate = _mydelegate;. – lolol Jan 8 '13 at 15:38
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having below in .h file

@property (retain, nonatomic) NSString* userName;

is syntactic sugar for

-(NSString*)userName;

-(void)setUserName:(NSString*)userName;

in the .h file

and @synthesize in .m is syntactic sugar for leaving for its own implementation by respecting your retain, nonatomic, etc. as specified in your property declaration.

you cannot synthesize with out @property, even if you specified suitable getter, setter signature in .h file.

But you can leave @synthesize and implement your own getter and setter.

If you did both @synthesize and also your custom getter setter, run-time respects your implementation and call the same.

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4

What happends when I declare a @property but forget to implement it with @synthesize or manually? What happends when I use @synthesize and forget the @property declaration?

Why don’t you try that? If you forget to synthesize the accessors or provide your own, the compiler will warn you. (And if you have it set to treat warnings as errors, which is a good idea, it’s impossible to miss the warning.) The second case will usually lead to a compile error.

So if we always need to implement the setter/getter why do we need to additionaly declare it? @property seems to be semantical redundant to me and a source for bugs.

To put it simply, @property is a property declaration and @synthesize is one possible implementation. One belongs to the header (= public interface description), the other to the implementation file. How would you do it if not this way?

2

Just wanted to add that you can also use @dynamic instead of @synthesize, although this is very rarely something you will need to do. @dynamic is basically telling the complier that you are somehow going to make sure that the calls to the getters and setters will be taken care of at run-time, either by making them yourself or by doing some extra messing around with some of the special features of the Objective C runtime.

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  • I'm interested in that "somehow". I wanted to back some dot style properties with a dictionary and failed utterly. Probably fruit for a question. – Rhythmic Fistman Mar 21 '13 at 3:12

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