7

On the advice of Code Analysis in VS to call Dispose on an object (which I wasn't previuosly) I ended up with a method containing this:

using (var favicon = new HtmlLink
                         {
                             Href = "~/templates/default/images/cc_favicon.ico"
                         })
{
    favicon.Attributes.Add("rel", "shortcut icon");
    Header.Controls.Add(favicon);
}

This confused me slightly, if I dispose this object after adding it to the Controls collection is that such a good idea?

How does this still work? Is it because the Controls.Add method disposes the object after use as opposed to holding on to it?

4
  • 2
    Does R# really suggest you should Dispose the HtmlLink? Can you screenshot that? That's not supposed to happen.
    – bzlm
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:23
  • @bzlm, I'll rephrase, it gives me the option to refactor into a using, sorry for the confusion.
    – Mantorok
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:25
  • 1
    then your concerns are correct. You shouldn't dispose ASP.NET Web Form controls that you add to the control collection. And as a general note, options provided by R# aren't always applicable; you should use them with caution. :) If you try alt-enter on a lot of different stuff in your code, you'll quickly notice that this is so.
    – bzlm
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:35
  • 1
    +1 @bzlm, it's crucial to be aware of the difference between R# Code Analysis that offers Quick Fixes - these have the 'light-bulb' icon - and Context Actions for code transformations - these have the 'pencil' icon. Sometimes the same line will prompt both kinds of action, in which case the Alt+Enter menu will have both. "Put into 'using' construct" is a context action rather than a quick-fix for precisely this reason - R# can't be sure if you own the lifetime of a given IDisposable, so can't say if it's appropriate for you to dispose it.
    – AakashM
    Sep 21 '11 at 10:13
2

I would say that this code shouldn't work but if you say it's working then the only things I can think of are:

  • Header.Controls.Add add a copy of the object so there is no problem disposing the original.
  • The Dispose method does not clean anything that is used later.

Hope this helps.

3
  • 3
    it's the latter Add does not copy the object
    – Rune FS
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:29
  • Not sure why someone downvoted me. I would like to argue why you think my answer is not correct. Please tell me. Sep 21 '11 at 9:30
  • I didn't downvote you but guessing the DV could be because the first bullet is incorrect
    – Rune FS
    Sep 21 '11 at 12:36
1

If a method on favicon is called that uses any of the unmanaged resources it will give exception.

From msdn:

You can instantiate the resource object and then pass the variable to the using statement, but this is not a best practice. In this case, the object remains in scope after control leaves the using block even though it will probably no longer have access to its unmanaged resources. In other words, it will no longer be fully initialized. If you try to use the object outside the using block, you risk causing an exception to be thrown. For this reason, it is generally better to instantiate the object in the using statement and limit its scope to the using block.

using statement msdn

6
  • This is interesting, because every control has a Render method in ASP.Net, so how does it achieve that on a disposed object?
    – Mantorok
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:28
  • Yeah, you are just lucky if it still works. It can break on any update or change later.
    – Peter
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:31
  • 1
    Do you think Code Analysis knows that? Or was it just luck!?
    – Mantorok
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:32
  • 2
    @Mantorok, Code Analysis doesn't know anything. It just sees an IDisposable and informs you that it can help you wrap it in a using statement, which you shouldn't.
    – bzlm
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:35
  • Code analysis doesn't know (otherwise he would not suggest this in this case), this is why you should do some thinking before applying all recommendations.
    – Peter
    Sep 21 '11 at 8:37
0

I assume that you code analysis gave you CA2000: Dispose objects before losing scope before you changed the code. The problem is that you shouldn't dispose your object because you want to use it even after returning from the method (it has been added to a collection).

You can either suppress the message using the SuppressMessage attribute or you can rewrite you code to be really paranoid:

var favicon = new HtmlLink { Href = "~/templates/default/images/cc_favicon.ico" };
try {
  favicon.Attributes.Add("rel", "shortcut icon");
}
catch {
  favicon.Dispose();
  throw;
}
Header.Controls.Add(favicon);

The normal flow of this code adds favicon to the collection that is then responsible for disposing it. However, the abnormal flow where favicon.Attributes.Add throws an exception will dispose favicon before propagating the exception.

In most case, because the garbage collector will do its job eventually, you don't need the paranoid version of the code.

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