57

My script defines one main parser and multiple subparsers. I want to apply the -p argument to some subparsers. So far the code looks like this:

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(prog="myProg")
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(title="actions")

parser.add_argument("-v", "--verbose",
                    action="store_true",
                    dest="VERBOSE",
                    help="run in verbose mode")

parser_create = subparsers.add_parser ("create", 
                                        help = "create the orbix environment")
parser_create.add_argument ("-p", 
                            type = int, 
                            required = True, 
                            help = "set db parameter")

# Update
parser_update = subparsers.add_parser ("update", 
                                        help = "update the orbix environment")
parser_update.add_argument ("-p", 
                            type = int, 
                            required = True, 
                            help = "set db parameter")

As you can see the add_arument ("-p") is repeated twice. I actually have a lot more subparsers. Is there a way to loop through the existing subparsers in order to avoid repetition?

For the record, I am using Python 2.7

74

This can be achieved by defining a parent parser containing the common option(s):

import argparse

parent_parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description="The parent parser")
parent_parser.add_argument("-p", type=int, required=True,
                           help="set db parameter")
subparsers = parent_parser.add_subparsers(title="actions")
parser_create = subparsers.add_parser("create", parents=[parent_parser],
                                      add_help=False,
                                      description="The create parser",
                                      help="create the orbix environment")
parser_create.add_argument("--name", help="name of the environment")
parser_update = subparsers.add_parser("update", parents=[parent_parser],
                                      add_help=False,
                                      description="The update parser",
                                      help="update the orbix environment")

This produces help messages of the format:

parent_parser.print_help()

Output:

usage: main.py [-h] -p P {create,update} ...
The parent parser
optional arguments:
  -h, --help       show this help message and exit
  -p P             set db parameter
actions:
  {create,update}
    create         create the orbix environment
    update         update the orbix environment
parser_create.print_help()

Output:

usage: main.py create [-h] -p P [--name NAME] {create,update} ...
The create parser
optional arguments:
  -h, --help       show this help message and exit
  -p P             set db parameter
  --name NAME      name of the environment
actions:
  {create,update}
    create         create the orbix environment
    update         update the orbix environment

However, if you run your program, you will not encounter an error if you do not specify an action (i.e. create or update). If you desire this behavior, modify your code as follows.

<...>
subparsers = parent_parser.add_subparsers(title="actions")
subparsers.required = True
subparsers.dest = 'command'
<...>

This fix was brought up in this SO question which refers to an issue tracking a pull request.

  • 11
    From the docs: "when a help message is requested from a subparser, only the help for that particular parser will be printed. The help message will not include parent parser or sibling parser messages." That seems like a major shortcoming of this strategy. – Ryne Everett Apr 12 '14 at 13:09
  • I ended up adding a dummy argument to the root parser with a help message. – Ryne Everett Apr 12 '14 at 19:49
  • 2
    @RyneEverett: that manual part is confusing and might be outdated, because it seems at least in Python 3.5.3 subparser --help includes arguments from the parent parser. – user1338062 Sep 17 '18 at 5:57
  • I've edited the answer showing --help outputs for parent and child parsers. Notice the help message for create shows both "create" and all actions, which is incorrect. The looping answers do not suffer from this issue – craymichael Jun 4 at 18:14
  • 3
    I think the reason it behaves oddly is that a "parent parser" is not actually the same thing as a "parser with subparsers". (note that the docs never show the two features used together) Pretty sure you need a top-level parser, a separate "parent" parser with the global args on it, and subparsers on the former with their parents= set to the latter. – Andrew Jul 16 at 0:48
7

You can also loop over the subparsers and add the same option to all of them.

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(prog="myProg")
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(title="actions")
parser.add_argument("-v", "--verbose",
                    action="store_true",
                    dest="VERBOSE",
                    help="run in verbose mode")

parser_create = subparsers.add_parser ("create", 
                                        help = "create the orbix environment")
parser_update = subparsers.add_parser ("update", 
                                        help = "update the orbix environment")

for subparser in [parser_create, parser_update]:
    subparser.add_argument ("-p", 
                            type = int, 
                            required = True, 
                            help = "set db parameter")
  • 2
    i think that's a bad aproach, cause you need to loop over parameters. it's more DRY and redable the Sven Marnach answer. – NeoMorfeo Oct 21 '15 at 11:00
4

You can loop over your subparsers in the following way.

for name, subp in subparsers.choices.items():
    print(subp)
    subp.add_argument(dest='g', help='Input for g variable', default=7, type=int)

Note that by using subparsers.choices that you avoid needing to hard-code all of the subparsers.

  • This is the same as @JanK's answer – craymichael Jun 3 at 22:24
  • 1
    @craymichael Not quite. It is similar, i'll give you that. The difference lies in the iterable. JanK's answer uses a list of parsers, mine uses subparsers.choices.items(). The advantage of subparsers.choices.items()is that subparsers.choices.items() always contains all used subparsers. When using a list you will have to change it when subparsers are added or removed. I do have to give Jank's credit for the idea, i just took it a step further because i dont like to hardcode and maintain the list. – Gerard Kool Jun 12 at 19:44
  • @Gerald Kool Ah, I see. I missed that when looking this answer over! Thank you – craymichael Jun 12 at 22:28
4

The accepted answer is correct; the proper way is to use parent parsers. However, the example code IMO was not really solving the problem. Let me add my few cents to provide a more suitable example.

The main difference with accepted answer is the explicit possibility to have some root-level arguments (like --verbose) as well as shared arguments only for some subparsers (-p only for the create and update subparsers but not for others)

# Same main parser as usual
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()

# Usual arguments which are applicable for the whole script / top-level args
parser.add_argument('--verbose', help='Common top-level parameter',
                    action='store_true', required=False)

# Same subparsers as usual
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='Desired action to perform', dest='action')

# Usual subparsers not using common options
parser_other = subparsers.add_parser("extra-action", help='Do something without db')

# Create parent subparser. Note `add_help=False` and creation via `argparse.`
parent_parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(add_help=False)
parent_parser.add_argument('-p', help='add db parameter', required=True)

# Subparsers based on parent

parser_create = subparsers.add_parser("create", parents=[parent_parser],
                                      help='Create something')
# Add some arguments exclusively for parser_create

parser_update = subparsers.add_parser("update", parents=[parent_parser],
                                      help='Update something')
# Add some arguments exclusively for parser_update 

This is the top-level help message (note that -p parameter is not shown here, which is exactly what you would expect—because it is specific to some subparsers):

>>> parser.print_help()
usage: [-h] [--verbose] {extra-action,create,update} ...

positional arguments:
  {extra-action,create,update}
                        Desired action to perform
    extra-action        Do something without db
    create              Create something
    update              Update something

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  --verbose             Common top-level parameter

And the help message for the create action:

>>> parser_create.print_help()
usage:  create [-h] -p P

optional arguments:
  -h, --help  show this help message and exit
  -p P        add db parameter
  • So, in my previous edit to the main answer, I include the "-p" option in the parent parser to show how users may have common options between all subparsers. I then showed that a "--name" option could be added to a single subparser that is unique to the create command/action. The main difference in our solutions is in how help is shown. Here is my output and here is your output. – craymichael Jul 2 at 19:53
  • @craymichael you do not need parent parser to add arguments for all (this can be done just with normal parser) ;) Different help is just an illustration for much bigger difference here. BTW I also added help output to my answer. – The Godfather Jul 3 at 20:19
  • 1
    I completely agree, it is not needed but some may want to use a mix of both. Your help messages are definitely cleaner, thanks for adding! – craymichael Jul 4 at 17:51
  • The separate parent parser is the only way to share positional arguments between multiple subcommands. – Paul Fenney Aug 14 at 9:17

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