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In PHP 8.2, Dynamic Properties are deprecated, and will result in a fatal error from PHP 9 onwards.

Using Dynamic Properties on Classes running PHP 8.2 will lead to PHP Deprecated: Creation of dynamic property is deprecated E_DEPRECATED warnings.

Now, while this is generally a bad OO practice to have public/dynamic properties in a Class, this question is not about the best OO practice but instead, how to make actual code that uses Dynamic Properties compatible with PHP 8.2 onwards.

How to make actual codebases that make use of Dynamic Properties compatible with the new behaviour?

6
  • 1
    According to wiki.php.net/rfc/deprecate_dynamic_properties you can put #[AllowDynamicProperties] on a class if you specifically want it to allow dynamic property creation. Is that useful for you? 3v4l.org/YhvnO
    – ADyson
    Commented Jan 3, 2023 at 10:02
  • 1
    @ADyson thank you for the hint, I never used attributes before. Will this RFC be also applied to PHP 8.2 onwards or is only a "sort of workaround" of this particular version? Also, do I have to apply this attribute on classes that extend the base class that internally use dynamic setters, or has it to be verbosely set in every child class? Also, is it enough to put this attribute on magic __set() or globally on the class itself?
    – Maurizio
    Commented Jan 3, 2023 at 18:34
  • I would assume it applies to all versions until it's deprecated and removed again. As for the rest, I don't know off the top of my head, you'd have to do a few simple experiments
    – ADyson
    Commented Jan 3, 2023 at 18:54
  • @ADyson thank you again for the previous comment. I've tested the #[AllowDynamicProperties] attribute, and created a github test project to showcase this particular feature. Anyway, I don't know where I'm getting this wrong, but it seems it does not work as expected. Do you mind having a look at that repo and help me understand where the problem is? Result of the test should be no deprecation warnings on workingImplementation, extendedClass and usingTrait, but that is not the case.
    – Maurizio
    Commented Jan 5, 2023 at 18:09
  • 1
    @ADyson I've posted an answer to my question using your valuable input. What I was doing wrong is that it is necessary to use the fully-qualified use \AllowDynamicProperties; on namespaced classes. Thank you again for your contribution.
    – Maurizio
    Commented Jan 7, 2023 at 10:38

3 Answers 3

8

As suggested by ADyson, the solution is to use the #[AllowDynamicProperties] attribute just above the class definition.

Classes marked with #[AllowDynamicProperties] as well as their children can continue using dynamic properties without deprecation or removal.

For classes that intentionally don't have a fixed set of properties, it's possible to either implement magic __get()/__set() or mark the class using the #[AllowDynamicProperties] attribute. Marking a class with #[AllowDynamicProperties] is fully backwards-compatible with earlier PHP versions, because prior to PHP 8.0 this would be interpreted as a comment, and the use non-existent classes as attributes is not an error.

This is a full example, as contained in this github repository that I've created to test this feature on Traits and Extended Classes

<?php
namespace App\Classes;

/**
 * Use the fully-qualified AllowDynamicProperties, otherwise the #[AllowDynamicProperties] attribute on "MyClass" WILL NOT WORK.
 */
use \AllowDynamicProperties;

#[AllowDynamicProperties]
class MyClass
{
    /**
     * Dynamic attributes will work with no deprecation warnings
     */
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->first_name = 'George';
        $this->last_name = 'Orwell';
    }
}

class MyExtendedClass extends MyClass 
{
    /**
     * Even if "MyExtendedClass" is not using #[AllowDynamicProperties], it extends "MyClass", that is using it.
     * Dynamic attributes will work with no deprecation warnings
     */
    public function __construct()
    {
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

Other noteworthy facts:

  • If you're willing to use the #[AllowDynamicProperties] attribute in non-namespaced contexts, the fully-qualified use \AllowDynamicProperties; statement is not strictly needed (this extends the comment of user706420)
  • If you need a quick and dirty fix (for example, an old codebase) you can use the class Foo extends \stdClass as suggested by Ale DC: dynamic properties will work as expected.
3
6

replace this:

class yourClassName {

for this:

class yourClassName extends \stdClass {
3
  • I'd consider this as dirty hack, as it circumvents reasonable restrictions but is rather using less restrictive behavior that was added as also reasonable exception, considering objects in json
    – David
    Commented Sep 1, 2023 at 15:39
  • 1
    Here the link (which can be found on this page already) about the explanation: wiki.php.net/rfc/deprecate_dynamic_properties
    – David
    Commented Sep 1, 2023 at 15:43
  • Brilliant solution. Will this still work in PHP 9?
    – php_nub_qq
    Commented Nov 21, 2023 at 0:48
3

When I was migrating to php8.2, this is what helped me

instead:

class yourClass {

try this:

#[AllowDynamicProperties]
class yourClass extends stdClass {
1
  • 2
    You don't need both attribute and extend class. Attribute should be good enough
    – Justinas
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 8:06

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