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I tried googling it but all results were about C++'s throw std::exception().

I was reading through libraries (was curious how stuff like printf, malloc and FILE were implemented) and came across the definition for the malloc function:

extern void *malloc (size_t __size) __THROW __attribute_malloc__
     __attribute_alloc_size__ ((1)) __wur;

When using the IDE (Visual Studio Code) to trace back to definitions for each thing, __THROW led to this:

# if !defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (3, 3)
   // stuff that doesn't happen
# else
#  if defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (2,8)
#   define __THROW  throw ()
#   define __THROWNL    throw ()
#   define __NTH(fct)   __LEAF_ATTR fct throw ()
#   define __NTHNL(fct) fct throw ()
// continuation to the if-else macro

This confused me, as, as far as i know, c doesn't have exceptions and instead uses int error codes. Even more, why are there parentheses as in a function call?

What does it mean and what does it do in the presented case?

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  • 4
    It doesn't mean anything in C, since C doesn't have exceptions.
    – Barmar
    Jan 5 at 22:04
  • 5
    if defined __cplusplus is only true when it's compiling C++, not C. When GCC is compiling C, the macro expands to nothing.
    – Barmar
    Jan 5 at 22:05
  • 1
    add #define __THROW XXX to your code, preprocessor will say '__THROW already defined here....` so you can see what is it defeined as
    – pm100
    Jan 5 at 22:06
  • 3
    The point of this is to allow the same header files to work in both C and C++. __THROW will expand in C++, but not in C.
    – Barmar
    Jan 5 at 22:07
  • i see, it's on me that i didn't pay close enough attention and got tricked by the ide code highlighting, thanks for clearing things up
    – Konstei
    Jan 5 at 22:08

3 Answers 3

5

There is no throw keyword in C. That's a C++ thing.

As to why you find it in your code, the clue is right here in the preprocessor macros:

# if !defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (3, 3)
   // stuff that doesn't happen
# else
#  if defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (2,8)
#   define __THROW  throw ()
#   define __THROWNL    throw ()
#   define __NTH(fct)   __LEAF_ATTR fct throw ()
#   define __NTHNL(fct) fct throw ()
// continuation to the if-else macro

This code is written so it will compile with either a C or C++ compiler. The C++ bit that references throw and other C++isms will only be compiled if a C++ compiler is used, as such a compiler will define the __cplusplus macro.

When you compile it with a C compiler, only the bit marked // stuff that doesn't happen will be used, not the else block.

3

The C 2017 standard doesn't define a throw keyword. The header file may be used by both C and C++ compilers and as @Barmar noted it doesn't apply to C (in C++, btw, throw() specifier means that the function doesn't throw exceptions).

2

There is no throw keyword in C. In C, the source text throw is an ordinary identifier.

The macro __THROW you show is replaced by nothing (an empty sequence of preprocessor tokens) when compiling in C, because the compilers the code you show is targeted for define __cplusplus only when compiling as C++, not when compiling as C. So, in C, !defined __cplusplus_ is true, and the // stuff that doesn't happen happens. You do not show that code, but it likely contains #define __THROW or equivalent, defining __THROW to be replaced by the empty sequence.

If you see other statements being used, where __THROW is defined to be replaced by throw (), then you are compiling in C++ mode, not C.

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