1

I am trying to fit a model that linearly relates two variables using R. I need to fit a Orthogonal Linear Regression (total least squares). So I'm trying to use the odregress() function of the pracma package which performs an Orthogonal Linear Regression via PCA.

Here an example data:

x <- c(1.0, 0.6, 1.2, 1.4, 0.2, 0.7, 1.0, 1.1, 0.8, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.1, 1.3, 0.9)
y <- c(0.5, 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, 0.2, 0.7, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.1, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.8)

I'm able to fit the model and get the coefficient using:

odr <- odregress(y, x)
c <- odr$coeff

So, the model is defined by the following equation:

print(c)
[1]  0.65145762 -0.03328271

Y = 0.65145762*X - 0.03328271

Now I need to plot the line fit, compute the RMSE and the R-squared. How can I do that?

plot(x, y)

3 Answers 3

2

Here are two functions to compute the MSE and RMSE.

library(pracma)

x <- c(1.0, 0.6, 1.2, 1.4, 0.2, 0.7, 1.0, 1.1, 0.8, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.1, 1.3, 0.9)
y <- c(0.5, 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, 0.2, 0.7, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.1, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.8)

odr <- odregress(y, x)

mse_odreg <- function(object) mean(object$resid^2)
rmse_odreg <- function(object) sqrt(mse_odreg(object))

rmse_odreg(odr)
#> [1] 0.5307982

Created on 2023-01-10 with reprex v2.0.2


Edit

The R^2 can be computed with the following function. Note that odr$ssq is not the sum of the squared residuals, odr$resid, it is the sum of the squared errors, odr$err.

r_squared_odreg <- function(object, y) {
  denom <- sum((y - mean(y))^2)
  1 - object$ssq/denom
}
r_squared_odreg(odr, y)
#> [1] 0.1494818

Created on 2023-01-10 with reprex v2.0.2

2
  • To plot the line fit: plot(x,y), and then: abline(odr$coeff[2], odr$coeff[1])
    – sermomon
    Commented Jan 10, 2023 at 14:54
  • Any idea how can I compute the R-squared?
    – sermomon
    Commented Jan 10, 2023 at 19:53
1

Here is another alternative to solve an Orthogonal Linear Regression (total least squares) via PCA according to what is explained in this post. It actually does the same as pracma::odregress.

x <- c(1.0, 0.6, 1.2, 1.4, 0.2, 0.7, 1.0, 1.1, 0.8, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.1, 1.3, 0.9)
y <- c(0.5, 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, 0.2, 0.7, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.1, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.8)

In this case we perform a Principal Component Analysis using the prcomp() function.

v <- prcomp(cbind(x,y))$rotation

Then we calculate the slope (m) from the firs principal component and the intercept (n):

# Y = mX + n
m <- v[2,1]/v[1,1]
n <- mean(y) - (m*mean(x))

Our model is defined by: f <- function(x){(m*x) + n}

We can plot it using:

plot(x, y)
abline(n, m, col="blue")

Finally we plot the Total Least Squares fit versus the Ordinary Least Squares fit.

plot(x, y)
abline(n, m, col="blue")
abline(lm(y~x), col="red")
legend("topleft", legend=c("TLS", "OLS"), col=c("blue", "red"), lty=1, bty="n")

TLS vs OLS

As you can see we obtain the same results as in pracma::odregress:

odr <- odregress(y, x)
print(odr$coeff)
print(paste(round(m, digits=7), round(n, digits=7)))

[1] 0.5199081 0.2558142
[1] 0.5199081 0.2558142
0

Limited to 2 variables there are plenty of alternatives via Deming and Passing Bablok regressions. Beware that some of them are not really generalistic and more related to method comparison and thus optimised for testing against the H0: (slope = 1, intercept = 0). Moreover PaBa methods usually need bigger samples and higher precision (ties problems)

x <- c(1.0, 0.6, 1.2, 1.4, 0.2, 0.7, 1.0, 1.1, 0.8, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.1, 1.3, 0.9)
y <- c(0.5, 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, 0.2, 0.7, 0.7, 0.9, 1.2, 1.1, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.8)

Bayesian Deming

library(rstanbdp)
library(rstan)

set.seed(1)
bdp.fit<-bdpreg(x,y)
summary(bd.bay$out)$summary[1:2,c(1,3,4,8)]

mean         sd       2.5%     97.5%
intercept 0.1161160 0.12150569 -0.1203164 0.3490423
slope     0.9805312 0.02157198  0.9390695 1.0254281

Frequentist Deming

library(mcr)
dem.ana<-mcreg(x,y,method.reg = "Deming",method.ci = "analytical")
MCResult.getCoefficients(dem.ana)

EST        SE        LCI      UCI
Intercept 0.2558142 0.5386573 -0.9078842 1.419513
Slope     0.5199081 0.5763981 -0.7253243 1.765141

Non parametric equivariant Passing Bablok

pbequi.ana<-mcreg(x,y,method.reg = "PBequi", method.ci = "analytical")
MCResult.getCoefficients(pbequi.ana)

EST        SE        LCI       UCI
Intercept 0.04444444 0.1462279 -0.2714618 0.3603507
Slope     0.77777778 0.1157210  0.5277778 1.0277778

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