I just read a great article about JavaScript Scoping and Hoisting by Ben Cherry in which he gives the following example:

var a = 1;

function b() {
    a = 10;
    return;

    function a() {}
}
b();
alert(a);

Using the code above, the browser will alert "1".

I'm still unsure why it returns "1". Some of the things he says come to mind like: All the function declarations are hoisted to the top. You can scope a variable using function. Still doesn't click for me.

14 Answers 14

up vote 104 down vote accepted

Function hoisting means that functions are moved to the top of their scope. That is,

function b() {  
   a = 10;  
   return;  
   function a() {} 
} 

will be rewritten by the interpeter to this

function b() {
  function a() {}
  a = 10;
  return;
}

Weird, eh?

Also, in this instance,

function a() {}

behaved the same as

var a = function () {};

So, in essence, this is what the code is doing:

var a = 1;                 //defines "a" in global scope
function b() {  
   var a = function () {}; //defines "a" in local scope 
   a = 10;                 //overwrites local variable "a"
   return;      
}       
b();       
alert(a);                 //alerts global variable "a"
  • 2
    So all the function declarations are eventually assigned to a variable? – dev.e.loper Sep 21 '11 at 21:41
  • 14
    @dev.e.loper Yes, in Javascript, functions are first class objects, just like strings and numbers. That means they are defined as variables and can be passed to other functions, be stored in arrays, and so on. – Peter Olson Sep 21 '11 at 21:44
  • 3
    In no way is the function body "rewritten". The various ECMAScript standards clearly state that variable and function declarations are processed before code execution begins. That is, nothing is moved, it's about order of execution (hence my dislike of the term "hoisting", which infers movement or rearrangement). In your re–written code, the declaration var a should be before the function declaration, and the assignment a = 1 should be after. But note that this isn't specified to actually happen by the parser, tokeniser, interpreter, compiler, whatever, it's just an equivalent. – RobG Jul 30 '15 at 0:22
  • 3
    @RobG Sure, I guess you could call the description a small "lie to children", but in the end the behavior is the same, whether the code is literally rearranged or just the order of execution is rearranged. What actually happens behind the scenes is more of an academic concern, and might even be implementation-dependent. – Peter Olson Jul 30 '15 at 1:11
  • 4
    “Also, in this instance, function a() {} behaved the same as var a = function () {}; — this is incorrect in two ways: first, if anything, it would’ve been var a = function a() {}; (the function is actually not anonymous), second, those two forms are not interchangeable, because from var a = function a() {}; only the var a; part would’ve been hoisted. The a = function a() {}; part would still have been behind the return statement. Because the original form is a function declaration and not a function expression, it actually gets hoisted as a whole. – Xufox Aug 18 '16 at 19:22

What you have to remember is that it parses the whole function and resolves all the variables declarations before executing it. So....

function a() {} 

really becomes

var a = function () {}

var a forces it into a local scope, and variable scope is through the entire function, so the global a variable is still 1 because you have declared a into a local scope by making it a function.

The function a is hoisted inside function b:

var a = 1; 
function b() { 
   function a() {} 
   a = 10; 
   return;
} 
b(); 
alert(a);

which is almost like using var:

var a = 1; 
function b() { 
   var a = function () {};
   a = 10; 
   return;
} 
b(); 
alert(a);

The function is declared locally, and setting a only happens in the local scope, not the global var.

  • 1
    this line "var a = function () {}; " makes every thing clear.. basically JavaScript is dynamic language and "function" is also an object in JavaScript. – refactor May 3 '16 at 9:12
  1. function declaration function a(){} is hoisted first and it behaves like var a = function () {};, hence in local scope a is created.
  2. If you have two variable with same name (one in global another in local), local variable always get precedence over global variable.
  3. When you set a=10, you are setting the local variable a , not the global one.

Hence, the value of global variable remain same and you get, alerted 1

function a() { } is a function statement, which creates an a variable local to the b function.
Variables are created when a function is parsed, regardless of whether the var or function statement gets executed.

a = 10 sets this local variable.

  • actually a = 10 sets a variable in the global scope when the function b is executed unless you add "use strict" (in such environments as support that directive). – Sean Vieira Sep 21 '11 at 21:35
  • @Sean: No, because the function statement creates a local identifier. – SLaks Sep 21 '11 at 21:46
  • ... and .... you're right. Hadn't realized that particular consequence of function hoisting. Thanks! – Sean Vieira Sep 21 '11 at 22:24

scpope & closure & hoisting (var/function)

  1. scpope : the global var can be access in any place(the whole file scope), local var only can be accessed by the local scope(function/block scope)!
    Note: if a local variable not using var keywords in a function, it will become a global variable!
  2. closure : a function inner the other function, which can access local scope(parent function) & global scope, howerver it's vars can't be accessed by others! unless, your return it as return value!
  3. hoisting : move all declare/undeclare vars/function to the scope top, than assign the value or null!
    Note: it just move the declare,not move the value!

var a = 1;                
//"a" is global scope
function b() {  
   var a = function () {}; 
   //"a" is local scope 
   var x = 12; 
   //"x" is local scope 
   a = 10;
   //global variable "a" was overwrited by the local variable "a"  
   console.log("local a =" + a);
   return console.log("local x = " + x);
}       
b();
// local a =10
// local x = 12
console.log("global a = " + a);
// global a = 1
console.log("can't access local x = \n");
// can't access local x = 
console.log(x);
// ReferenceError: x is not defined

Hoisting is a concept made for us to make it easier to understand. What actually happens is the declarations are done first with respect to their scopes and the assignments will happen after that(not at the same time).

When the declarations happen, var a, then function b and inside that b scope, function a is declared.

This function a will shadow the variable a coming from the global scope.

After the declarations are done, the values assign will start, the global a will get the value 1 and the a inside function b will get 10. when you do alert(a), it will call the actual global scope variable. This little change to the code will make it more clear

        var a = 1;

    function b() {
        a = 10;
        return a;

        function a() { }
    }

    alert(b());
    alert(a);
  • 1
    It's curious that so many experts even in a course at codeschool.com refers to hoisting which is nothing more than a simplistic view of what happens, actually hoisting does not happen at all. Ref: 1) developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Glossary/Hoisting 2) Chapter 5 of Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja 2/e by john resig, bear bebeault, josip maras – adnan2nd Oct 20 '17 at 7:01

It is happening because of the Variable name is same as the function name means "a". Thus due to Javascript hoisting it try to solve the naming conflict and it will return a = 1.

I was also confused about this until i read this post on "JavaScript Hoisting" http://www.ufthelp.com/2014/11/JavaScript-Hoisting.html

Hope it helps.

Here's my recap of the answer with more annotation and an acompaniying fiddle to play around with.

// hoisting_example.js

// top of scope ie. global var a = 1
var a = 1;

// new scope due to js' functional (not block) level scope
function b() {
    a = 10; // if the function 'a' didn't exist in this scope, global a = 10
  return; // the return illustrates that function 'a' is hoisted to top
  function a(){}; // 'a' will be hoisted to top as var a = function(){};
}

// exec 'b' and you would expect to see a = 10 in subsequent alert
// but the interpreter acutally 'hoisted' the function 'a' within 'b' 
// and in doing so, created a new named variable 'a' 
// which is a function within b's scope
b();

// a will alert 1, see comment above
alert(a);

https://jsfiddle.net/adjavaherian/fffpxjx7/

What is the bone of contention in this small snippet of code?

Case 1:

Include function a(){} definition inside the body of function b as follows. logs value of a = 1

var a = 1;
function b() {
  a = 10;
  return;

  function a() {}
}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 1

Case 2

Exclude function a(){} definition inside the body of function b as follows. logs value of a = 10

var a = 1;
function b() {
  a = 10;  // overwrites the value of global 'var a'
  return;
}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 10

Observation will help you realise that statement console.log(a) logs the following values.

Case 1 : a = 1

Case 2 : a = 10

Posits

  1. var a has been defined and declared lexically in the global scope.
  2. a=10 This statement is reassigning value to 10, it lexically sits inside the function b.

Explanation of both the cases

Because of function definition with name property a is same as the variable a. The variable a inside the function body b becomes a local variable. The previous line implies that the global value of a remains intact and the local value of a is updated to 10.

So, what we intend to say is that the code below

var a = 1;
function b() {
  a = 10;
  return;

  function a() {}
}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 1

It is interpreted by the JS interpreter as follows.

var a = 1;
function b() {
  function a() {}
  a = 10;
  return;


}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 1

However, when we remove the function a(){} definition, the value of 'a' declared and defined outside the function b, that value gets overwritten and it changes to 10 in case 2. The value gets overwritten because a=10 refers to the global declaration and if it were to be declared locally we must have written var a = 10;.

var a = 1;
function b() {
  var a = 10; // here var a is declared and defined locally because it uses a var keyword. 
  return;
}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 1

We can clarify our doubt further by changing the name property in function a(){} definition to some other name than 'a'

var a = 1;
function b() {
  a = 10; // here var a is declared and defined locally because it uses a var keyword. 
  return;

  function foo() {}
}
b();
console.log(a); // logs a = 1

Hoisting In JavaScript means, variable declarations are executed through out the program before any code is executed. Therefore declaring a variable anywhere in the code is equivalent to declaring it at the beginning.

Its all depends on the scope of variable 'a'. Let me explain by creating scopes as images.

Here JavaScript will create 3 scopes.

i) Global scope. ii) Function b() scope. iii) Function a() scope.

enter image description here

Its clear when you call 'alert' method scope belongs to Global that time, so it will pick value of variable 'a' from Global scope only that is 1.

Long Post!

But it will clear the air!

The way Java Script works is that it involves a two step process:

  1. Compilation(so to speak) - This step registers variables and function declarations and their respective scope. It does not involve evaluating function expression: var a = function(){} or variable expression (like assigning 3 to x in case of var x =3; which is nothing but the evaluation of R.H.S part.)

  2. Interpreter: This is the execution/evaluation part.

Check the output of below code to get an understanding:

//b() can be called here!
//c() cannot be called.
console.log("a is " + a);
console.log("b is " + b);
console.log("c is " + c);
var a = 1;
console.log("Now, a is " + a);
var c = function() {};
console.log("Now c is " + c);

function b() {
  //cannot write the below line:
  //console.log(e); 
  //since e is not declared.
  e = 10; //Java script interpreter after traversing from this function scope chain to global scope, is unable to find this variable and eventually initialises it with value 10 in global scope.
  console.log("e is " + e) //  works!
  console.log("f is " + f);
  var f = 7;
  console.log("Now f is " + f);
  console.log("d is " + d);
  return;

  function d() {}
}
b();
console.log(a);

Lets break it:

  1. In the compilation phase, 'a' would be registered under global scope with value 'undefined'. Same goes for 'c', its value at this moment would be 'undefined' and not the 'function()'. 'b' would be registered as a function in the global scope. Inside b's scope, 'f' would be registered as a variable which would be undefined at this moment and function 'd' would be registered.

  2. When interpreter runs, declared variables and function() (and not expressions) can be accessed before the interpreter reaches the actual expression line. So, variables would be printed 'undefined' and declared anonymous function can be called earlier. However, trying to access undeclared variable before its expression initialisation would result in an error like:

console.log(e)
e = 3;

Now, what happens when you have variable and function declaration with same name.

Answer is - functions are always hoisted before and if the same name variable is declared, it is treated as duplicate and ignored. Remember, order does not matter. Functions are always given precedence. But during evaluation phase you can change the variable reference to anything (It stores whatever was the last assignment) Have a look at the below code:

var a = 1;
console.log("a is " + a);

function b() {
  console.log("a inside the function b is " + a); //interpreter finds                                'a' as function() in current scope. No need to go outside the scope to find 'a'.
  a = 3; //a changed
  console.log("Now a is " + a);
  return;

  function a() {}
}
var a; //treated as duplicate and ignored.
b();
console.log("a is still " + a + " in global scope"); //This is global scope a.

Hoisting is behavioural concept of JavaScript. Hoisting (say moving) is concept that explains how and where variables should be declared.

In JavaScript, a variable can be declared after it has been used because Function declarations and variable declarations are always moved (“hoisted”) invisibly to the top of their containing scope by the JavaScript interpreter.

We encounter two types of hoisting in most cases.

1.Variable declaration hoisting

Lets understand this by this piece of code.

 a = 5; // Assign 5 to a
 elem = document.getElementById("demo"); // Find an element 
 elem.innerHTML = a;                     // Display a in the element
 var a; // Declare a
  //output-> 5

Here declaration of variable a will be hosted to top invisibly by the javascript interpreter at the time of compilation. So we were able to get value of a. But this approach of declaration of variables is not recommended as we should declare variables to top already like this.

 var a = 5; // Assign and declare 5 to a
 elem = document.getElementById("demo"); // Find an element 
 elem.innerHTML = a;                     // Display a in the element
  // output -> 5

consider another example.

  function foo() {
     console.log(x)
     var x = 1;
 }

is actually interpreted like this:

  function foo() {
     var x;
     console.log(x)
     x = 1;
  }

In this case x will be undefined

It does not matter if the code has executed which contains the declaration of variable. Consider this example.

  function foo() {
     if (false) {
         var a = 1;
     }
     return;
     var b = 1;
  }

This function turns out to be like this.

  function foo() {
      var a, b;
      if (false) {
        a = 1;
     }
     return;
     b = 1;
  }

In variable declaration only variable definition hoists, not the assignment.

  1. Function declaration hoisting

Unlike the variable hoisting the function body or assigned value will also be hoisted. Consider this code

 function demo() {
     foo(); // this will give error because it is variable hoisting
     bar(); // "this will run!" as it is function hoisting
     var foo = function () {
         alert("this would not run!!");
     }
     function bar() { 
         alert("this will run!!");
     }
 }
 demo();

Now as we understood both variable and function hoisting, let's understand this code now.

var a = 1;
function b() {
  a = 10;
  return;
   function a() {}
}
b();
alert(a);

This code will turn out to be like this.

var a = 1;                 //defines "a" in global scope
 function b() {  
   var a = function () {}; //defines "a" in local scope 
    a = 10;                 //overwrites local variable "a"
    return;      
 }       
 b();       
 alert(a); 

The function a() will have local scope inside b(). a() will be moved to top while interpreting the code with its definition (only in case of function hoisting) so a now will have local scope and therefore will not affect the global scope of a while having its own scope inside function b().

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