61

I'm using a ResultSet in Java, and am not sure how to properly close it. I'm considering using the ResultSet to construct a HashMap and then closing the ResultSet after that. Is this HashMap technique efficient, or are there more efficient ways of handling this situation? I need both keys and values, so using a HashMap seemed like a logical choice.

If using a HashMap is the most efficient method, how do I construct and use the HashMap in my code?

Here's what I've tried:

public HashMap resultSetToHashMap(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {

  ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
  int columns = md.getColumnCount();
  HashMap row = new HashMap();
  while (rs.next()) {
     for (int i = 1; i <= columns; i++) {
       row.put(md.getColumnName(i), rs.getObject(i));
     }
  }
  return row;
}
6
  • Post portion of your code where you are creating hashmap and populating with resultset. Sep 21, 2011 at 21:52
  • 2
    Misleading method name...I see no ArrayList.
    – Zaki
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:08
  • @Deepak: What you do is generally OK, but you need to rs.close() before you return. Copying the data from result set to HashMap is correct way provided that you need to access the whole data set.
    – dma_k
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:09
  • @Zaki: Sorry for that :P
    – Deepak
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:10
  • 4
    Don't close the ResultSet in this method. The ResultSet is passed as a parameter, so it's the caller responsibility to close it. And the close should be done in a 'finally' block so it gets done even if an Exception is thrown. Sep 21, 2011 at 22:20

8 Answers 8

95
  1. Iterate over the ResultSet
  2. Create a new Object for each row, to store the fields you need
  3. Add this new object to ArrayList or Hashmap or whatever you fancy
  4. Close the ResultSet, Statement and the DB connection

Done

EDIT: now that you have posted code, I have made a few changes to it.

public List resultSetToArrayList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException{
  ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
  int columns = md.getColumnCount();
  ArrayList list = new ArrayList(50);
  while (rs.next()){
     HashMap row = new HashMap(columns);
     for(int i=1; i<=columns; ++i){           
      row.put(md.getColumnName(i),rs.getObject(i));
     }
      list.add(row);
  }

 return list;
}
9
  • and why list ?? why cant we use hashmap as it is ?
    – Deepak
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:14
  • 1
    @Deepak, becasue a List is a collection of records from the database, where each record (row) is represented as a HashMap, where each hashmap is a mapping from column name and the record data.
    – Zaki
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:15
  • Okay i got it!! If i just use HashMap i will get only one row all the time is it ??
    – Deepak
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:17
  • 1
    I was posting my answer while you guys were hashing this out (no pun intended). In any recent Java compiler, you will get warnings for not using type safe collections. Also, the 'list' and 'row' variables should be declared using the type safe versions of List and Map, not ArrayList and HashMap. You then assign new ArrayList and HashMap instances to those variables. Sep 21, 2011 at 22:27
  • 3
    Returning a List<Map<String, Object>> is a row-centric way of viewing things. If you want a column-centric view, return a Map<String, List<Object>> where the key is the column name. Sometimes it might be more useful to you.
    – duffymo
    Sep 21, 2011 at 22:34
36

I just cleaned up RHT's answer to eliminate some warnings and thought I would share. Eclipse did most of the work:

public List<HashMap<String,Object>> convertResultSetToList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
    int columns = md.getColumnCount();
    List<HashMap<String,Object>> list = new ArrayList<HashMap<String,Object>>();

    while (rs.next()) {
        HashMap<String,Object> row = new HashMap<String, Object>(columns);
        for(int i=1; i<=columns; ++i) {
            row.put(md.getColumnName(i),rs.getObject(i));
        }
        list.add(row);
    }

    return list;
}
4
  • use while(rs.hasNext()) instead of .next()? Feb 13, 2019 at 4:23
  • Thank you for cleaning it up, this works fine!
    – manudicri
    Apr 29, 2021 at 11:15
  • @AlexanderMills if you use rs.hasNext() then you will have to add rs.next() inside the loop again anyway. This way its 2 birds 1 stone. Aug 6, 2021 at 14:31
  • Many thanks @Brad M ! It can even be slightly more simplified by omitting the types for the constructors of ArrayList and HashMap in the corresponding lines: List<HashMap<String,Object>> list = new ArrayList<>(); and HashMap<String,Object> row = new HashMap<>(columns);
    – Alan Z.
    Feb 3 at 12:37
17

RHT pretty much has it. Or you could use a RowSetDynaClass and let someone else do all the work :)

0
6

this is my alternative solution, instead of a List of Map, i'm using a Map of List. Tested on tables of 5000 elements, on a remote db, times are around 350ms for eiter method.

private Map<String, List<Object>> resultSetToArrayList(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    ResultSetMetaData md = rs.getMetaData();
    int columns = md.getColumnCount();
    Map<String, List<Object>> map = new HashMap<>(columns);
    for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i) {
        map.put(md.getColumnName(i), new ArrayList<>());
    }
    while (rs.next()) {
        for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i) {
            map.get(md.getColumnName(i)).add(rs.getObject(i));
        }
    }

    return map;
}
1
  • I really like this solution. I tried using ResultSet.getArray(int columnIndex) to get whole columns at once, but at least for com.mysql.cj.jdbc.Driver, that resulted in a SQLFeatureNotSupportedException
    – William
    Jan 9, 2018 at 21:21
4

A couple of things to enhance the other answers. First, you should never return a HashMap, which is a specific implementation. Return instead a plain old java.util.Map. But that's actually not right for this example, anyway. Your code only returns the last row of the ResultSet as a (Hash)Map. You instead want to return a List<Map<String,Object>>. Think about how you should modify your code to do that. (Or you could take Dave Newton's suggestion).

0
1

i improved the solutions of RHTs/Brad Ms and of Lestos answer.

i extended both solutions in leaving the state there, where it was found. So i save the current ResultSet position and restore it after i created the maps.

The rs is the ResultSet, its a field variable and so in my solutions-snippets not visible.

I replaced the specific Map in Brad Ms solution to the gerneric Map.

    public List<Map<String, Object>> resultAsListMap() throws SQLException
    {
        var md = rs.getMetaData();
        var columns = md.getColumnCount();
        var list = new ArrayList<Map<String, Object>>();

        var currRowIndex = rs.getRow();
        rs.beforeFirst();

        while (rs.next())
        {
            HashMap<String, Object> row = new HashMap<String, Object>(columns);
            for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i)
            {
                row.put(md.getColumnName(i), rs.getObject(i));
            }

            list.add(row);
        }

        rs.absolute(currRowIndex);

        return list;
    }

In Lestos solution, i optimized the code. In his code he have to lookup the Maps each iteration of that for-loop. I reduced that to only one array-acces each for-loop iteration. So the program must not seach each iteration step for that string-key.

    public Map<String, List<Object>> resultAsMapList() throws SQLException
    {
        var md = rs.getMetaData();
        var columns = md.getColumnCount();
        var tmp = new ArrayList[columns];
        var map = new HashMap<String, List<Object>>(columns);

        var currRowIndex = rs.getRow();
        rs.beforeFirst();

        for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i)
        {
            tmp[i - 1] = new ArrayList<>();
            map.put(md.getColumnName(i), tmp[i - 1]);
        }

        while (rs.next())
        {
            for (int i = 1; i <= columns; ++i)
            {
                tmp[i - 1].add(rs.getObject(i));
            }
        }

        rs.absolute(currRowIndex);

        return map;
    }
0

Here is the code little modified that i got it from google -

 List data_table = new ArrayList<>();
    Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
            con = DriverManager.getConnection(conn_url, user_id, password);
            Statement stmt = con.createStatement();
            System.out.println("query_string: "+query_string);
            ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(query_string);
            ResultSetMetaData rsmd = rs.getMetaData();


            int row_count = 0;
            while (rs.next()) {
                HashMap<String, String> data_map = new HashMap<>();
                if (row_count == 240001) {
                    break;
                }
                for (int i = 1; i <= rsmd.getColumnCount(); i++) {
                    data_map.put(rsmd.getColumnName(i), rs.getString(i));
                }
                data_table.add(data_map);
                row_count = row_count + 1;
            }
            rs.close();
            stmt.close();
            con.close();
2
  • it returns the query output in the for of ArrayList<HashMap<String,String>>
    – masvel
    Nov 4, 2019 at 20:08
  • Hi, please be more descriptive in your answers. Nov 4, 2019 at 20:20
0
public static List<HashMap<Object, Object>> GetListOfDataFromResultSet(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
        ResultSetMetaData metaData = rs.getMetaData();
        int count = metaData.getColumnCount();
        String[] columnName = new String[count];
        List<HashMap<Object,Object>> lst=new ArrayList<>();
        while(rs.next()) {
            HashMap<Object,Object> map=new HashMap<>();
            for (int i = 1; i <= count; i++){
                   columnName[i-1] = metaData.getColumnLabel(i);
                   map.put(columnName[i-1], rs.getObject(i));
            }
            lst.add(map);

        }
        return lst;
    }

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