82

I am new to iPhone development and objective C. I have used NSUserDefaults to store some values in my app. But I don't know that if there is any limit for storing values in NSUserDefaults. Can anyone help me to know that.

Thanks in advance.

2
  • NSUserDefaults is intended for relatively small amounts of data, queried very frequently, and modified occasionally. Using it in other ways may be slow or use more memory than solutions more suited to those uses. Currently there is no limit for local user defaults except on tvOS. I found this information by "cmd click" on UserDefaults which takes you to their source file. I read the documentation looking for this information, but couldn't find it there.
    – Bobby
    May 30, 2017 at 12:49
  • 1
    I'm not sure but you can see this link.
    – TheTiger
    Apr 4, 2018 at 13:07

10 Answers 10

60

As long as there's enough space on the iPhone/iPad, you can store NSUserDefault values. All those values is stored into a .plist file, and this file is very small, most of the time under 1 kb (unless you store a lot of data).

2
  • Is there any impact on device performance after add big files/Data ?
    – iDeveloper
    Feb 28, 2018 at 9:27
  • 1
    Might be true but see this link. What is correct?
    – TheTiger
    Apr 4, 2018 at 13:07
50

There are limits on what types you may store: they must all be Property List objects, namely NSString, NSNumber, NSData, NSArray, and NSDictionary. Furthermore, you may only store NSArray and NSDictionary if the values are also property list objects; also, all the keys of the NSDictionary must be strings.

Note that an object like UIColor is not on the above list. So if you want to store a color in the defaults database, you'll need to convert it into a string or data object first, then convert it back when you read the defaults.

As far as size limits, there are none that are documented, but note that all data will be stored as a property list file. The entire file is read in and written out as a whole, so if you use NSUserDefaults to store a large amount of data that only changes in parts, you will be wasting a lot of time doing unnecessary I/O.

1
  • 6
    The point about this being a single file is quite critical. Very good information, thanks.
    – MobileVet
    Dec 2, 2014 at 1:10
16

Everyone has answered the direct question of "is there a limit?" However, I found this thread really looking to understand "how much is too much to store in UserDefaults?"

If you're looking for that answer, here's a useful thread. The responses I found helpful were to go to your project file and look at the plist file size:

5 objects is almost nothing. You'll be fine!


On my machine, I have about 28 megs of data in my user defaults. That's not causing any problems at all.


From general programming experience with arrays I would guess performance starts to rapidly decay when you get into 1000’s, depending on element size. Therefore in a program I wouldn’t have an issue storing a couple of hundred elements. This said I would probably start using a sqlite3 database or coredata, sooner rather than later if I were you.

Important to remember:

The above alleviated my concerns that my growing number of defaults (about 20-25 now) would cause problems. I use CoreData already, so I was considering which to use since my number of allowed user preferences/customizations is growing long. So, I'm going to stay with user defaults.

However, as other answers have pointed out, the file will be read and written as a whole. So reading 20 key/string dictionaries and 5 key/boolean dictionaries just to retrieve one string... not exactly ideal. Nonetheless, if it doesn't hurt performance and it saves you a ton of code, why not?

16

From iOS SDK codes, and related Apple official document..

extension UserDefaults {


    /*!
     NSUserDefaultsSizeLimitExceededNotification is posted on the main queue when more data is stored in user defaults than is allowed. Currently there is no limit for local user defaults except on tvOS, where a warning notification will be posted at 512kB, and the process terminated at 1MB. For ubiquitous defaults, the limit depends on the logged in iCloud user.
     */
    @available(iOS 9.3, *)
    public class let sizeLimitExceededNotification: NSNotification.Name


    // ....
 }   


Summary

  1. Currently there is no limit for local user defaults
  2. On tvOS, where a warning notification will be posted at 512kB, and the process terminated at 1MB.
  3. For ubiquitous defaults, the limit depends on the logged in iCloud user.
7

As of iPadOS 13.1 beta 3, I'm now seeing the following message when trying to store a larger object (an image).

2019-09-14 11:01:29.634368+0100 MyApp[1686:147223] [User Defaults] CFPrefsPlistSource<0x283c7d980> (Domain: com.example.MyApp, User: kCFPreferencesCurrentUser, ByHost: No, Container: (null), Contents Need Refresh: No): Attempting to store >= 4194304 bytes of data in CFPreferences/NSUserDefaults on this platform is invalid. This is a bug in MyApp or a library it uses

However retrieving the key appears to still work.

6
  • I am having this issue too! Have you found the cause/solution?
    – SAHM
    Nov 22, 2019 at 21:57
  • @SAHM Not sure re the cause. As I was simply saving a single image as a user preference, I ended up writing the data to the documents folder instead of using user defaults.
    – Doug
    Nov 23, 2019 at 22:16
  • Out of curiosity, @Doug, were you using "synchronize" after saving?
    – SAHM
    Nov 25, 2019 at 18:58
  • I have some thoughts about this if you want to chat.
    – SAHM
    Nov 25, 2019 at 19:16
  • @SAHM Nope I wasn’t calling synchronize. As stated in the docs, “this method is unnecessary and shouldn't be used.”
    – Doug
    Nov 27, 2019 at 9:11
7

As many already mentioned: I'm not aware of any SIZE limitation (except physical memory) to store data in a .plist (e.g. UserDefaults). So it's not a question of HOW MUCH.

The real question should be HOW OFTEN you write new / changed values... And this is related to the battery drain this writes will cause.

IOS has no chance to avoid a physical write to "disk" if a single value changed, just to keep data integrity. Regarding UserDefaults this cause the whole file rewritten to disk.

This powers up the "disk" and keep it powered up for a longer time and prevent IOS to go to low power state.

From "Energy Efficiency Guide for iOS Apps":

Minimize data writes. Write to files only when their content has changed, and aggregate changes into a single write whenever possible. Avoid writing out an entire file if only a few bytes have changed. If you frequently change small portions of large files, consider using a database to store the data instead.

READS are no problem, as all values are cached in memory.

EDIT: (July 2019): I just found this very good blog post by Jeffry Fulton.

https://jeffreyfulton.ca/blog/2018/02/userdefaults-limitations-and-alternatives

He describes in detail the different aspects of the user defaults and also writes about some performance tests.

Happy Coding!!!

5

There is No Limit for storing values in NSUserDefaults..

1
  • I'm getting this error: Attempting to store >= 4194304 bytes of data in CFPreferences/NSUserDefaults on this platform is invalid. This is a bug in App or a library it uses
    – Arjun
    Feb 11 at 8:57
5

The only Storage Limitation in NSUserDefaults is the Device Storage Capacity.

As much as there are available Storage Space in an iOS Device, you can practically store data in NSUserDefaults. The key-value pair is stored on a xml structured file (.plist) which is stored in an App Bundle.

The user defaults system and key-value store are both designed for storing simple data types—strings, numbers, dates, Boolean values, URLs, data objects, and so forth—in a property list. The use of a property list also means you can organize your preference data using array and dictionary types. It is also possible to store other objects in a property list by encoding them into an NSData object first.

2

As far as my knowledge there is no limit for storing in NSUserdefaults.

1
  • I'm getting this error: Attempting to store >= 4194304 bytes of data in CFPreferences/NSUserDefaults on this platform is invalid. This is a bug in MyApp or a library it uses
    – Arjun
    Feb 11 at 8:58
0

It whatever the maximum allowed file size is on the drive. You can use this piece of code to check it out!

NSUserDefaults *defaults = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults];
NSString *myKey = @"key";
int sizeOfFile = 1024; // Fill in proper file size here
NSData myObject;
NSString *someFilePath = @"PathToYourFileHere";

for(int i = 1; i < 9999999999999999; i++)
{
  myObject = [NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:someFilePath];
  [defaults setObject:myObject forKey:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%i", myKey, i]];
  NSLog(@"Iteration: %i, TotalWritten: %i", i, i * sizeOfFile);
}
1
  • 6
    FYI int values don't go that high, so you'll end up with an overflow (assuming you make it past ~2.15B iterations) in your loop. Before that though, you'll end up overflowing sizeOfFile.
    – Stonz2
    Feb 17, 2016 at 15:01

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