11

Is there a Powershell command to list all SQL instances on my system? (MS SQL 2008)

  • Ohh my god! So many good answers! Thank you a lot! But now I´m a little bit confused. Which is the best answer? :-) – LaPhi Sep 23 '11 at 13:57
23
0

Just another way of doing it...can be a little quicker than SQLPS to get a quick answer.


(get-itemproperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server').InstalledInstances
| improve this answer | |
6
0

Import powershell sql server extensions:

 Import-Module SqlServer 

Then do these commands

Set-Location SQLSERVER:\SQL\localhost
Get-ChildItem
| improve this answer | |
  • On my computer get-childitem from SQLSERVER:\SQL\localhost is really slow. I can't test in other computer now. Is a normal behavior? thanks – CB. Sep 23 '11 at 7:41
  • Better ways is: get-childitem | select instancename – CB. Sep 23 '11 at 8:24
  • Great! This also worked on remote systems: Set-Location SQLSERVER:\SQL\remoteserver; Get-ChildItem. – simlev Jan 23 '19 at 16:16
5
0

I found that (for me at least) none of the above returned my SQL Express instance. I have 5 named instances, 4 full-fat SQL Server, 1 SQL Express. The 4 full-fat are included in the answers above, the SQL Express isn't. SO, I did a little digging around the internet and came across this article by James Kehr, which lists information about all SQL Server instances on a machine. I used this code as a basis for writing the function below.

# get all sql instances, defaults to local machine, '.'
Function Get-SqlInstances {
  Param($ServerName = '.')

  $localInstances = @()
  [array]$captions = gwmi win32_service -computerName $ServerName | ?{$_.Name -match "mssql*" -and $_.PathName -match "sqlservr.exe"} | %{$_.Caption}
  foreach ($caption in $captions) {
    if ($caption -eq "MSSQLSERVER") {
      $localInstances += "MSSQLSERVER"
    } else {
      $temp = $caption | %{$_.split(" ")[-1]} | %{$_.trimStart("(")} | %{$_.trimEnd(")")}
      $localInstances += "$ServerName\$temp"
    }
  }
  $localInstances
}
| improve this answer | |
4
0
[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlWmiManagement") | out-null
$mach = '.'
$m = New-Object ('Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Wmi.ManagedComputer') $mach
$m.ServerInstances
| improve this answer | |
  • Can also use $m = (Get-Item SQLServer:\SQL\$mach).ManagedComputer – David Gardiner Apr 8 '14 at 1:50
2
0
$a = "MyComputerName"

 [System.Data.Sql.SqlDataSourceEnumerator]::Instance.GetDataSources() | ? { $_.servername -eq $a}

Aaron method return a more sure response. Read Here about Instance.GetDataSources()

| improve this answer | |
2
0

The System.Data.Sql namespace contains classes that support SQL Server-specific functionality.

By using the System.Data.Sql namespace you can get all MSSQL instances on a machine using this command in windows power shell: [System.Data.Sql.SqlDataSourceEnumerator]::Instance.GetDataSources()

| improve this answer | |
0
0

This function it gonna return all the installed instances with the version details in a object list:

function ListSQLInstances {
$listinstances = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList
$installedInstances = (get-itemproperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server').InstalledInstances
foreach ($i in $installedInstances) {
    $instancefullname = (Get-ItemProperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\Instance Names\SQL').$i
    $productversion = (Get-ItemProperty "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\$instancefullname\Setup").Version
    $majorversion = switch -Regex ($productversion) {
        '8' { 'SQL2000' }
        '9' { 'SQL2005' }
        '10.0' { 'SQL2008' }
        '10.5' { 'SQL2008 R2' }
        '11' { 'SQL2012' }
        '12' { 'SQL2014' }
        '13' { 'SQL2016' }    
        '14' { 'SQL2017' } 
        '15' { 'SQL2019' } 
        default { "Unknown" }
    }
    $instance = [PSCustomObject]@{
        Instance             = $i
        InstanceNameFullName = $instancefullname;
        Edition              = (Get-ItemProperty "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\$instancefullname\Setup").Edition;
        ProductVersion       = $productversion;
        MajorVersion         = $majorversion;
    }
    $listinstances.Add($instance)
}

Return $listinstances
}

$instances = ListSQLInstances
foreach ($instance in $instances) {
    Write-Host $instance.Instance
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.