20

I have TextBlock that has Inlines dynamicly added to it (basically bunch of Run objects that are either italic or bold).

In my application I have search function.

I want to be able to highlight TextBlock's text that is in being searched for.

By highlighting I mean changing certain parts of TextBlock text's color (keeping in mind that it may highlight several different Run objects at a time).

I have tried this example http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/tamir/archive/2008/05/12/search-and-highlight-any-text-on-wpf-rendered-page.aspx

But it seams very unstable :(

Is there easy way to solve this problem?

12 Answers 12

18

This question is similar to How to display search results in a WPF items control with highlighted query terms

In answer to that question, I came up with an approach that uses an IValueConverter. The converter takes a text snippet, formats it into valid XAML markup, and uses a XamlReader to instantiate the markup into framework objects.

The full explanation is rather long, so I've posted it to my blog: Highlighting Query Terms in a WPF TextBlock

14

I took dthrasers answer and took out the need for an XML parser. He does a great job explaining each of the pieces in his blog, However this didn't require me to add any extra libraries, here's how I did it.

Step one, make a converter class:

class StringToXamlConverter : IValueConverter
{

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        string input = value as string;
        if (input != null)
        {
            var textBlock = new TextBlock();
            textBlock.TextWrapping = TextWrapping.Wrap;
            string escapedXml = SecurityElement.Escape(input);

            while (escapedXml.IndexOf("|~S~|") != -1) {
            //up to |~S~| is normal
            textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run(escapedXml.Substring(0, escapedXml.IndexOf("|~S~|"))));
            //between |~S~| and |~E~| is highlighted
            textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run(escapedXml.Substring(escapedXml.IndexOf("|~S~|") + 5,
                                      escapedXml.IndexOf("|~E~|") - (escapedXml.IndexOf("|~S~|") + 5))) 
                                      { FontWeight = FontWeights.Bold, Background= Brushes.Yellow });
            //the rest of the string (after the |~E~|)
            escapedXml = escapedXml.Substring(escapedXml.IndexOf("|~E~|") + 5);
            }

            if (escapedXml.Length > 0)
            {
                textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run(escapedXml));                      
            }
            return textBlock;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException("This converter cannot be used in two-way binding.");
    }

}

Step two: Instead of a TextBlock use a ContentBlock. Pass in the string (you would of used for your textBlock) to the content block, like so:

<ContentControl Margin="7,0,0,0"
                HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                VerticalAlignment="Center"
                Content="{Binding Description, Converter={StaticResource CONVERTERS_StringToXaml}, Mode=OneTime}">
</ContentControl>

Step three: Make sure the text you pass includes |~S~| before and |~E~| after the text part you want to be highlighted. For example in this string "my text |~S~|is|~E~| good" the is will be highlighted in yellow.

Notes:
You can change the style in the run to determine what and how your text is highlighted
Make sure you add your Converter class to your namespace and resources. This might also require a rebuild to get working.

14

works in .NET Framework 4.7-4.8. May need adjustments to work in newer .NET versions like .NET 6, see comments.

Differences to other solutions

  • easier to reuse -> attached behavior instead of custom control
  • MVVM friendly -> no code behind
  • works BOTH ways! -> Changing the term to be highlighted OR the text, both updates the highlight in the textblock. The other solutions i checked had the problem, that changing the text does not reapply the highlighting. Only changing the highlighted term/search text worked.

How to use

  • IMPORTANT: do NOT use the regular Text="blabla" property of the TextBlock anymore. Instead bind your text to HighlightTermBehavior.Text="blabla".
  • Add the attached properties to your TextBlock like that
<TextBlock local:HighlightTermBehavior.TermToBeHighlighted="{Binding MyTerm}"
           local:HighlightTermBehavior.Text="{Binding MyText}" />

or hardcoded

<TextBlock local:HighlightTermBehavior.TermToBeHighlighted="highlight this"
           local:HighlightTermBehavior.Text="bla highlight this bla" />

Add this class

  • To change the kind of highlighting, just change these Methods:
    AddPartToTextBlock() for non highlighted text
    AddHighlightedPartToTextBlock() for the highlighted text.
  • At the moment highlighted is FontWeights.ExtraBold and non highlighted text is FontWeights.Light.
  • probably hard to read without an IDE, sorry.
public static class HighlightTermBehavior
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty TextProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
        "Text",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(HighlightTermBehavior),
        new FrameworkPropertyMetadata("", OnTextChanged));

    public static string GetText(FrameworkElement frameworkElement)               => (string) frameworkElement.GetValue(TextProperty);
    public static void   SetText(FrameworkElement frameworkElement, string value) => frameworkElement.SetValue(TextProperty, value);


    public static readonly DependencyProperty TermToBeHighlightedProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
        "TermToBeHighlighted",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(HighlightTermBehavior),
        new FrameworkPropertyMetadata("", OnTextChanged));

    public static string GetTermToBeHighlighted(FrameworkElement frameworkElement)
    {
        return (string) frameworkElement.GetValue(TermToBeHighlightedProperty);
    }

    public static void SetTermToBeHighlighted(FrameworkElement frameworkElement, string value)
    {
        frameworkElement.SetValue(TermToBeHighlightedProperty, value);
    }


    private static void OnTextChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (d is TextBlock textBlock)
            SetTextBlockTextAndHighlightTerm(textBlock, GetText(textBlock), GetTermToBeHighlighted(textBlock));
    }

    private static void SetTextBlockTextAndHighlightTerm(TextBlock textBlock, string text, string termToBeHighlighted)
    {
        textBlock.Text = string.Empty;

        if (TextIsEmpty(text))
            return;

        if (TextIsNotContainingTermToBeHighlighted(text, termToBeHighlighted))
        {
            AddPartToTextBlock(textBlock, text);
            return;
        }

        var textParts = SplitTextIntoTermAndNotTermParts(text, termToBeHighlighted);

        foreach (var textPart in textParts)
            AddPartToTextBlockAndHighlightIfNecessary(textBlock, termToBeHighlighted, textPart);
    }

    private static bool TextIsEmpty(string text)
    {
        return text.Length == 0;
    }

    private static bool TextIsNotContainingTermToBeHighlighted(string text, string termToBeHighlighted)
    {
        return text.Contains(termToBeHighlighted, StringComparison.Ordinal) == false;
    }

    private static void AddPartToTextBlockAndHighlightIfNecessary(TextBlock textBlock, string termToBeHighlighted, string textPart)
    {
        if (textPart == termToBeHighlighted)
            AddHighlightedPartToTextBlock(textBlock, textPart);
        else
            AddPartToTextBlock(textBlock, textPart);
    }

    private static void AddPartToTextBlock(TextBlock textBlock, string part)
    {
        textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run {Text = part, FontWeight = FontWeights.Light});
    }

    private static void AddHighlightedPartToTextBlock(TextBlock textBlock, string part)
    {
        textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run {Text = part, FontWeight = FontWeights.ExtraBold});
    }


    public static List<string> SplitTextIntoTermAndNotTermParts(string text, string term)
    {
        if (text.IsNullOrEmpty())
            return new List<string>() {string.Empty};

        return Regex.Split(text, $@"({Regex.Escape(term)})")
                    .Where(p => p != string.Empty)
                    .ToList();
    }
}
7
  • 1
    Works grate i just change the Regex.Split to ignore case Regex.Split(text, $@"({Regex.Escape(term)})", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
    – shmoltz
    Commented Jul 9, 2020 at 14:37
  • 2
    @shmoltz To get this case insensitive, you would also need to change TextIsNotContainingTermToBeHighlighted and AddPartToTextBlockAndHighlightIfNecessary to compare case insensitive. Commented Jan 3, 2021 at 14:19
  • To get this to build I had to change: public static class HighlightTermBehavior to: public class HighlightTermBehavior : UIElement
    – Buzz
    Commented Mar 4, 2023 at 1:48
  • @Buzz strange. That code was used in .NET framework 4.7 or 4.8. maybe you use a newer .NET version which requires some modification to that code. do you know what .NET version you are using?
    – Welcor
    Commented Mar 4, 2023 at 14:19
  • 1
    @Welcor, yeah using .NET Core 6.0
    – Buzz
    Commented Mar 5, 2023 at 18:32
7

By strange coincidence, I have recently written an article that solves the very same problem. It is a custom control that has the same properties as a TextBlock (so you can swap is out for a TextBlock wherever you need it), and it has an extra Property that you can bind to called HighLightText, and wherever the value of HighLightText is found in the main Text property (case insensitive), it is highlighted.

It was a fairly straight-forward control to create, and you can find the full code as a solution here:

SearchMatchTextblock(GitHub)

4
  • 2
    The links you provided are dead.
    – Lion King
    Commented Oct 10, 2018 at 7:15
  • 1
    They are still dead. Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 19:04
  • The article isnt around anymore, but the source code is - the github link above works fine
    – Dean Chalk
    Commented May 2, 2020 at 10:06
  • Nice work! Handy control with great performance. Commented Feb 8, 2021 at 8:29
4

Here is what I came up with by building off of the exisiting TextBlock and adding a new dependency property named SearchText:

public class SearchHightlightTextBlock : TextBlock
{
    public SearchHightlightTextBlock() : base() { }

    public String SearchText { get { return (String)GetValue(SearchTextProperty); }
                               set { SetValue(SearchTextProperty, value); } }      

    private static void OnDataChanged(DependencyObject source,
                                      DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        TextBlock tb = (TextBlock)source;

        if (tb.Text.Length == 0)
            return;

        string textUpper = tb.Text.ToUpper();
        String toFind = ((String) e.NewValue).ToUpper();
        int firstIndex = textUpper.IndexOf(toFind);
        String firstStr = tb.Text.Substring(0, firstIndex);
        String foundStr = tb.Text.Substring(firstIndex, toFind.Length);
        String endStr = tb.Text.Substring(firstIndex + toFind.Length, 
                                         tb.Text.Length - (firstIndex + toFind.Length));

        tb.Inlines.Clear();
        var run = new Run();
        run.Text = firstStr;
        tb.Inlines.Add(run);
        run = new Run();
        run.Background = Brushes.Yellow;
        run.Text = foundStr;
        tb.Inlines.Add(run);
        run = new Run();
        run.Text = endStr;

        tb.Inlines.Add(run);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty SearchTextProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("SearchText", 
                                    typeof(String), 
                                    typeof(SearchHightlightTextBlock), 
                                    new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null, OnDataChanged));
}

And in your view, this:

<view:SearchHightlightTextBlock SearchText="{Binding TextPropertyContainingTextToSearch}" 
                                Text="{Binding YourTextProperty}"/>
0
2

Here I present another Approach for highlighting text. I had a use case where I needed to decorate a bunch of C# Code in WPF, however I did not want to use textBlock.Inlines.Add type of syntax, instead I wanted to generate the highlighting XAML on the fly and then dynamically add it to a Canvas or some other container in WPF.

So suppose you want to colorize the following piece of code and also highlight a part of it:

public static void TestLoop(int count)
{ 
   for(int i=0;i<count;i++)
     Console.WriteLine(i);
}

Suppose the above code is found in a file called Test.txt . Suppose you want to colorize all the C# keywords (public, static, void etc..) and simple types(int, string) in Blue, and Console.WriteLine highlight in yellow.

Step 0. Create a new WPF Application and include some sample code similar to above in a file called Test.txt

Step 1. Create a Code Highlighter class:

using System.IO;
using System.Text;

public enum HighLightType
{
    Type = 0,
    Keyword = 1,
    CustomTerm = 2
}

public class CodeHighlighter
{
    public static string[] KeyWords = { "public", "static", "void", "return", "while", "for", "if" };
    public static string[] Types = { "string", "int", "double", "long" };

    private string FormatCodeInXaml(string code, bool withLineBreak)
    {
        string[] mapAr = { "<","&lt;" , //Replace less than sign
                            ">","&gt;" }; //Replace greater than sign
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(code))))
        {
            while (!sr.EndOfStream)
            {
                string line = sr.ReadLine();

                line = line.Replace("\t", "&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;"); //Replace tabs
                line = line.Replace(" ", "&#160;"); //Replace spaces

                for (int i = 0; i < mapAr.Length; i += 2)
                    line = line.Replace(mapAr[i], mapAr[i + 1]);

                if (withLineBreak)
                    sb.AppendLine(line + "<LineBreak/>"); //Replace line breaks
                else
                    sb.AppendLine(line);
            }

        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }


    private string BuildForegroundTag(string highlightText, string color)
    {
        return "<Span Foreground=\"" + color + "\">" + highlightText + "</Span>";
    }

    private string BuildBackgroundTag(string highlightText, string color)
    {
        return "<Span Background=\"" + color + "\">" + highlightText + "</Span>";
    }

    private string HighlightTerm(HighLightType type, string term, string line)
    {
        if (term == string.Empty)
            return line;

        string keywordColor = "Blue";
        string typeColor = "Blue";
        string statementColor = "Yellow";

        if (type == HighLightType.Type)
            return line.Replace(term, BuildForegroundTag(term, typeColor));
        if (type == HighLightType.Keyword)
            return line.Replace(term, BuildForegroundTag(term, keywordColor));
        if (type == HighLightType.CustomTerm)
            return line.Replace(term, BuildBackgroundTag(term, statementColor));

        return line;
    }

    public string ApplyHighlights(string code, string customTerm)
    {
        code = FormatCodeInXaml(code, true);
        customTerm = FormatCodeInXaml(customTerm, false).Trim();

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(code))))
        {
            while (!sr.EndOfStream)
            {
                string line = sr.ReadLine();

                line = HighlightTerm(HighLightType.CustomTerm, customTerm, line);

                foreach (string keyWord in KeyWords)
                    line = HighlightTerm(HighLightType.Keyword, keyWord, line);

                foreach (string type in Types)
                    line = HighlightTerm(HighLightType.Type, type, line);

                sb.AppendLine(line);
            }
        }

        return sb.ToString();

    }
}

Step 2. Add a Canvas XAML tag to your MainWindow.xaml

<Window x:Class="TestCodeVisualizer.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
        xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:TestCodeVisualizer"
        mc:Ignorable="d"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">

    <Canvas Name="canvas" />
</Window>

Step 3. In Your WPF Application add the following code: (make sure that test.txt is in the correct location) :

using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Markup;

namespace TestCodeVisualizer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            string testText = File.ReadAllText("Test.txt");
            FrameworkElement fe = GenerateHighlightedTextBlock(testText, "Console.WriteLine");
            this.canvas.Children.Add(fe);
        }


        private FrameworkElement GenerateHighlightedTextBlock(string code, string term)
        {
            CodeHighlighter ch = new CodeHighlighter();
            string uc = "<UserControl xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation' xmlns:x='http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml'>[CONTENT]</UserControl>";

            string content = "<TextBlock>" + ch.ApplyHighlights(code, term) + "</TextBlock>";
            uc = uc.Replace("[CONTENT]", content);

            FrameworkElement fe = XamlReader.Load(new System.IO.MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(uc))) as FrameworkElement;
            return fe;
        }

    }
}
2

I had a similar problem - trying to implement a text search over a load of presenters that basically represent a report. The report was originally written into a string and we were leveraging FlowDocumentViewer's built in ctrl-F - it's not very good and has some wierd options but was sufficient.

If you just want something like that you can do the following:

        <FlowDocumentScrollViewer>
            <FlowDocument>
                <Paragraph FontFamily="Lucida Console" FontSize="12">
                    <Run Text="{Binding Content, Mode=OneWay}"/>
                </Paragraph>
            </FlowDocument>
        </FlowDocumentScrollViewer>

We decided to go for a rewrite as the report is kept in sync with the rest of the program and basically every edit changes it, having to recreate the entire report everytime means that this is quite slow. We wanted to improve this by moving to a update-the-bits-you-need-to model but needed to have view model (rather than just a string) to be able to do that in a sane way! We wanted to preserve the searching functionality before swapping out the report however and go one better and have highlighting of the 'current' search position in one colour and other search hits in another.

Here's a simplified version of my solution; a class that derives from TextBlock that adds a dependency property of Type HighlightingInformation. I've not included the namespace and usings as they are sensitive.

public class HighlightingTextBlock : TextBlock
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty HighlightingProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Highlighting", typeof (HighlightingInformation), typeof (HighlightingTextBlock));

    public HighlightingInformation Highlighting
    {
        get { return (HighlightingInformation)GetValue(HighlightingProperty); }
        set { SetValue(HighlightingProperty, value); }
    }

    public HighlightingTextBlock()
    {
        AddValueChangedCallBackTo(HighlightingProperty, UpdateText);
    }

    private void AddValueChangedCallBackTo(DependencyProperty property, Action updateAction)
    {
        var descriptor = DescriptorFor(property);
        descriptor.AddValueChanged(this, (src, args) => updateAction());
    }

    private DependencyPropertyDescriptor DescriptorFor(DependencyProperty property)
    {
        return DependencyPropertyDescriptor.FromProperty(property, GetType());
    }

    private void UpdateText()
    {
        var highlighting = Highlighting;
        if (highlighting == null)
            return;
        highlighting.SetUpdateMethod(UpdateText);

        var runs = highlighting.Runs;
        Inlines.Clear();
        Inlines.AddRange(runs);
    }
}

The type this class can be bound to uses the update method when it's text and list of highlights are changed to update the list of Runs. The highlights themselves look something like this:

public class Highlight
{
    private readonly int _length;
    private readonly Brush _colour;

    public int Start { get; private set; }

    public Highlight(int start, int length,Brush colour)
    {
        Start = start;
        _length = length;
        _colour = colour;
    }

    private string TextFrom(string currentText)
    {
        return currentText.Substring(Start, _length);
    }

    public Run RunFrom(string currentText)
    {
        return new Run(TextFrom(currentText)){Background = _colour};
    }
}

To produce the correct collection of highlights is a seperate problem, which I basically solved by treating the collection of presenters as a Tree that you recursively search for content - leaf nodes are those that have content and other nodes just have children. If you search depth-first you get the order you'd expect. You can then basically write a wrapper around the list of results to keep track of the position. Im not going to post all the code for this - my response here it is to document how you can make wpf do multi-coloured highlighting in MVP style.

I haven't used INotifyPropertyChanged or CollectionChanged here as we didn't need the changes to be multi-cast (eg one presenter has multiple views). Initially I tried to do that by adding an event changed notification for Text and one for a list (which you also have to manually subscribe to the INotifyCollectionChanged event on). I had concerns about memory leaks from the event subcriptions however and the fact that the updates for the text and the highlights didn't come at the same time made it problematic.

The one drawback of this approach is that people shouldn't bind to the Text property of this control. In the real version I have added some checking + exception throwing to stop people from doing this but ommitted it from the example for clarity's sake!

0

Ended up writing following code

At moment has few bugs, but solves the problem

if (Main.IsFullTextSearch)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < runs.Count; i++)
    {
        if (runs[i] is Run)
        {
            Run originalRun = (Run)runs[i];

            if (Main.SearchCondition != null && originalRun.Text.ToLower()
                .Contains(Main.SearchCondition.ToLower()))
            {
                int pos = originalRun.Text.ToLower()
                          .IndexOf(Main.SearchCondition.ToLower());

                if (pos > 0)
                {
                    Run preRun = CloneRun(originalRun);
                    Run postRun = CloneRun(originalRun);

                    preRun.Text = originalRun.Text.Substring(0, pos);
                    postRun.Text = originalRun.Text
                        .Substring(pos + Main.SearchCondition.Length);

                    runs.Insert(i - 1 < 0 ? 0 : i - 1, preRun);
                    runs.Insert(i + 1, new Run(" "));
                    runs.Insert(i + 2, postRun);

                    originalRun.Text = originalRun.Text
                        .Substring(pos, Main.SearchCondition.Length);

                    SolidColorBrush brush = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Yellow);
                    originalRun.Background = brush;

                    i += 3;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
0
0

If you are handling ContainerContentChanging for your ListViewBase, you can take the following approach: TextBlock highlighting for WinRT/ContainerContentChanging

Please note that this code is for Windows RT. The WPF syntax will be slightly different. Also note that if you are using binding to populate the TextBlock.Text property, the text generated by my approach will be overwritten. I use ContainerContentChanging to populate target fields because of radically-increased performance and improvements in memory usage, vs. normal binding. I use binding only to manage the source data, not the data view.

0

The following highlight search method takes your TextBlock and search term then returns your block with this term or words which contain this term highlighted purple.

    private TextBlock HighlightSearch(TextBlock textBlock, string searchTerm)
    {
        string[] words = textBlock.Text.Split(' ');

        textBlock.Text = string.Empty; 
        
        foreach (string word in words)
        {
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchTerm) &&
                word.IndexOf(searchTerm, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0)
            {
                textBlock.Inlines.Add(new Run($"{word} ") { Foreground = Brushes.Purple, FontWeight = FontWeights.DemiBold });
            }
            else
            {
                textBlock.Inlines.Add($"{word} ");
            }
        }

        return textBlock; 
    }

`

0

The requirement I had was highlighting must be fully style-able beyond just a few pre-defined options:

public partial class HighlightTextBlock : UserControl
{
    public HighlightTextBlock()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty TextBlockStyleProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        nameof(TextBlockStyle), typeof(Style), typeof(HighlightTextBlock), new PropertyMetadata(default(Style)));
    public Style TextBlockStyle
    {
        get { return (Style)GetValue(TextBlockStyleProperty); }
        set { SetValue(TextBlockStyleProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty HighlightTextElementStyleProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        nameof(HighlightTextElementStyle), typeof(Style), typeof(HighlightTextBlock), new PropertyMetadata(default(Style)));
    public Style HighlightTextElementStyle
    {
        get { return (Style)GetValue(HighlightTextElementStyleProperty); }
        set { SetValue(HighlightTextElementStyleProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty NormalTextElementStyleProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        nameof(NormalTextElementStyle), typeof(Style), typeof(HighlightTextBlock), new PropertyMetadata(default(Style)));
    public Style NormalTextElementStyle
    {
        get { return (Style)GetValue(NormalTextElementStyleProperty); }
        set { SetValue(NormalTextElementStyleProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty TextProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        nameof(Text), typeof(string), typeof(HighlightTextBlock), new PropertyMetadata(default(string), PropertyChangedCallback));
    public string Text
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(TextProperty); }
        set { SetValue(TextProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty HighlightProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        nameof(Highlight), typeof(string), typeof(HighlightTextBlock), new PropertyMetadata(default(string), PropertyChangedCallback));
    public string Highlight
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(HighlightProperty); }
        set { SetValue(HighlightProperty, value); }
    }
    
    private static void PropertyChangedCallback(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        d.EnsureType<HighlightTextBlock>().update();
    }
    
    private void update()
    {
        var highlightLength = this.Highlight?.Length ?? 0;

        if (highlightLength > 0)
        {
            var highlightOffset = this.Text?.IndexOf(this.Highlight, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) ?? -1;

            if (highlightOffset > -1)
            {
                PrefixRun.Text = this.Text.Substring(0, highlightOffset);
                HighlightRun.Text = this.Text.Substring(highlightOffset, highlightLength);
                SuffixRun.Text = this.Text.Substring(highlightOffset + highlightLength);
                return;
            }
        }

        PrefixRun.Text = this.Text;
        HighlightRun.Text = null;
        SuffixRun.Text = null;
    }
}

Mind PropertyChangedCallback used by HighlightProperty and TextProperty.

XAML:

<UserControl x:Class="Example.HighlightTextBlock"
             x:Name="self"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008">
    <Grid>
        <TextBlock DataContext="{Binding ElementName=self}" Style="{Binding TextBlockStyle}">
            <!-- NOTE: TO avoid whitespaces when rendering Inlines, avoid them in markup (e.g. between Run tags)-->
            <TextBlock.Inlines><Run 
                                    x:Name="PrefixRun"     x:FieldModifier="private" Style="{Binding NormalTextElementStyle}"/><Run 
                                    x:Name="HighlightRun"  x:FieldModifier="private" Style="{Binding HighlightTextElementStyle}"/><Run 
                                    x:Name="SuffixRun"     x:FieldModifier="private" Style="{Binding NormalTextElementStyle}"/></TextBlock.Inlines>
        </TextBlock>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

DataTemplate:

<DataTemplate x:Key="ExampleDataTemplate">
    <DataTemplate.Resources>
        <Style x:Key="HighlightTextElementStyle" TargetType="{x:Type Inline}">
            <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="DarkGray"/>
            <Setter Property="FontWeight" Value="Bold"/>
            <Setter Property="TextDecorations" Value="Underline"/>
        </Style>
        
        <Style x:Key="TextBlockStyle" TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type TextBlock}}">
            <Setter Property="Foreground" Value="White"/>
            <Setter Property="HorizontalAlignment" Value="Stretch"/>
            <Setter Property="TextAlignment" Value="Left"/>
        </Style>
    </DataTemplate.Resources>

    <controls1:HighlightTextBlock Text="{Binding ExampleText}"
                                  Highlight="{Binding ExampleHighlight}"
                                  TextBlockStyle="{StaticResource TextBlockStyle}"
                                  HighlightTextElementStyle="{StaticResource HighlightTextElementStyle}"/>
</DataTemplate>
-1

There is a component EasyHighlightTextBlock that I found may be quite good to solve your problem. It uses the <tags></tags> to highlight the text. Like this: check here to see

I hope it can be helpful for you.

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