2

I'm doing a project where I manually create sorting algorithms.

After several tests I found out that my heapsort is way quicker than quicksort (I think it should be the other way around), my selection sort is also faster than insertion sort. does anyone know what's the problem here?

I'm testing using integers from -100 to 100, randomly generated, 5000 values in an array (I modified this number several times, still the same problems). My quicksort isn't in-place. I thought that maybe flash's recursive functions are slow? my heapsort uses loops, unlike quicksort. That's just a hypothesis though.

here are my codes, if they help. I start a timer, run the class's exec() function, stop the timer and calculate the elapsed time. Codes come from wikipedia. problem with heapsort vs quicksort:

public class Quick {
public static function exec(seq:Vector.<int>):Vector.<int> {
    if (seq.length<=1) {
        return seq;
    }
    var smallPart:Vector.<int>=new Vector.<int>
    var bigPart:Vector.<int>=new Vector.<int>
    var n:int=seq.length;
    var pivotPosition:int=Math.floor(Math.random()*n);
    var pivot:int=seq.splice(pivotPosition,1)[0];
    for (var i:int=0; i<n-1; i++) {
        if (seq[i]<=pivot) {
            smallPart.push(seq[i]);
        } else {
            bigPart.push(seq[i]);
        }
    }
    seq=exec(smallPart).concat(exec(bigPart),Vector.<int>([pivot]));
    return seq;
}

}

public class Heap{
public static function exec(seq:Vector.<int>) {
    var n:int=seq.length;
    heapify(seq);
    var end:int=n-1;
    while (end > 0) {
        var temp:int=seq[end];
        seq[end]=seq[0];
        seq[0]=temp;
        siftDown(seq, 0, end-1);
        end--;
    }
    return seq
}
public static function heapify(seq:Vector.<int>) {
    var n:int=seq.length
    var start:int=n/2-1
    while (start >= 0) {
        siftDown(seq, start, n-1);
        start--;
    }
}
public static function siftDown(seq:Vector.<int>, start:int, end:int) {
    var root:int=start;
    while (root * 2 + 1 <= end) {
        var child:int=root*2+1;
        var swap:int=root;
        if (seq[swap]<seq[child]) {
            swap=child;
        }
        if (child+1<=end&&seq[swap]<seq[child+1]) {
            swap=child+1;
        }
        if (swap!=root) {
            var temp:int=seq[root];
            seq[root]=seq[swap];
            seq[swap]=temp;
            root=swap;
        } else {
            break;
        }    
    }
}

}

problem with insertion sort vs selection sort:

public class Insertion{
public static function exec(seq:Vector.<int>) {
    var n:int=seq.length;
    for (var i:int=1; i<n; i++) {
        var holder:int=seq[i];
        var j:int=i-1;
        while (seq[j]>holder) {
            seq[j+1]=seq[j];
            j-=1;
            if (j<0) {
                break
            }
        }
        seq[j+1]=holder;
    }
    return seq
}

}

public class Selection{
public static function exec(seq:Vector.<int>):void{
    var currentMinimum:int;
    var n:int=seq.length;
    for (var i:int = 0; i < n-1; i++) {
        currentMinimum=i;
        for (var j:int = i+1; j < n; j++) {
            if (seq[j]<seq[currentMinimum]) {
                currentMinimum=j;
            }
        }
        if (currentMinimum!=i) {
            var temp:int=seq[i];
            seq[i]=seq[currentMinimum];
            seq[currentMinimum]=temp;
        }
    }
}

}

  • 2
    Don't use timer, use Date . I remember hearing somewhere that timer can go off at wrong times. – The_asMan Sep 22 '11 at 18:35
3

Okay, so I don't actually know actionscript but there are many possibilities for this:

Language problems

I don't know how actionscript works but in C++ and potentially other languages, if you pass the vectors by value instead of reference it can significantly slow things down. (Thanks to alxx for clearing that up)

In the quicksort case, you seem to be creating a lot of new vectors. If this operation is slow (I again remind you, I don't know actionscript) it could bias it in favour of heapsort.

As The_asMan said, perhaps your method of timing is not accurate and perhaps you should use a different language feature.

Algorithm problems

You are using 5000 values from [-100, 100]. This means there are going to be a large number of duplicates. One of the main reasons quicksort is fast is that there are a lot of optimizations you can use. A plain (optimizationless) quicksort can be very slow if there are duplicate values.

In addition there are many other optimizations that make quicksort often faster in practice.

Perception problems

Heh. Perception problems. Trololol ;)

Insertion sort isn't necessarily faster than selection sort (I'm not sure where you got the idea from). The main case where insertion sort is very fast is when the list is almost sorted. In this case the insertion of each element only requires a few swaps. But in the general case (random numbers) it hasn't got a significant advantage over selection sort.

Hope this helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Vector is a class, always passed by reference is ActionScript. – alxx Sep 22 '11 at 22:18
0

If you want to compare the speed of those sort algorithms. Then why don't you pre-create a random Vector/Array. Then test it's speed. Like :

var source:Vector = new Vector().<5000, true>;
genRandomNumber(source);

var t:int = getTimer();
quicksort(source ....);
t = getTimer() - t;
trace("quicksort:" + t + "ms");

genRandomNumber(source);
t = getTimer();
heapsort(source ...);
t = getTimer() - t;
trace("heapsort:" + t + "ms");
.
.
.

Here's a quicksort demo by kirupa. I'v tested some sort algorithms before, and quicksort is the fastest.

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0

I think to really answer this question, you need to take a step back and examine your assumptions. When you say something like "heapsort should be faster than quicksort", what makes you say that?

If your reason is "because one has a better big O notation", you need to review what big O really means. big O notation ignores constant factors, and when using small numbers like 5000, constant factors can overwhelm the asymptotic behavior.

If your reason is "because wikipedia says one is usually faster", you need to focus on the "usually". A number of factors can influence which one is faster, like how big your sample size is, whether the numbers are already partially sorted, how many duplicate numbers you have. Other factors include cache behavior - some algorithms involve more localized memory access, and can take advantage of the cache better. On the other hand, an interpreted language may or may not screw up that locality compared to a compiled program, thus further confusing matters.

One thing you should definitely try is running with some different test data - try 10 million items, where the items are numbers from 0 to 4 billion or so. Then try 10 items, varying from 0 to 20. You should not necessarily expect to see the same algorithm "win" for both cases.

The test data you are using now is probably not the best use case for general purpose sorting algorithms. With 5000 numbers chosen out of a potential pool of only 200, you are guaranteed to have large numbers of duplicates. With so many duplicates, a counting sort is almost certainly fastest.

Some other thing to consider - how confident are you in your timing function? Do you know if actionscript is interpreted or compiled? Are you running your tests 100 times or so to amoritize any initialization work that needs to be done?

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