554

I wanted to clarify if I understand this correctly:

  • == -> is a reference comparison, i.e. both objects point to the same memory location
  • .equals() -> evaluates to the comparison of values in the objects

Am I correct in my understanding ?

  • 33
    yeah, pretty much – John Kane Sep 22 '11 at 19:40
  • 8
    Yes, spot on. You can think of .equals() as meaningfully equivalent – vikingsteve Jul 8 '13 at 13:30
  • Possible duplicate of How do I compare strings in Java? – TylerH Jun 22 '16 at 20:46
  • 13
    A sentence like "both objects point to the same memory location" is sloppy language, which can make understanding more difficult. You mean: "both variables refer to the same object". Note that a variable is not an object; a variable is a reference to an object. Objects don't "point to" anything. – Jesper Feb 8 '17 at 9:47

22 Answers 22

563

In general, the answer to your question is "yes", but...

  • .equals(...) will only compare what it is written to compare, no more, no less.
  • If a class does not override the equals method, then it defaults to the equals(Object o) method of the closest parent class that has overridden this method.
  • If no parent classes have provided an override, then it defaults to the method from the ultimate parent class, Object, and so you're left with the Object#equals(Object o) method. Per the Object API this is the same as ==; that is, it returns true if and only if both variables refer to the same object, if their references are one and the same. Thus you will be testing for object equality and not functional equality.
  • Always remember to override hashCode if you override equals so as not to "break the contract". As per the API, the result returned from the hashCode() method for two objects must be the same if their equals methods show that they are equivalent. The converse is not necessarily true.
  • if == checks for memory reference then why am I getting this strange behavior in [this][1][1]: docs.google.com/document/d/… I expected output to be true. can clear my confusions – JPG Jun 14 '15 at 8:19
  • 4
    @JSK print the values of d1 and d2 and I think you'll see why you're returning false. – BoDidely Jul 29 '15 at 20:01
  • 2
    @BoDidely I figured it out. It was because all the wrapper classes are immutable. – JPG Jul 31 '15 at 20:41
  • The equals method for class Object implements the most discriminating possible equivalence relation on objects; that is, for any non-null reference values x and y, this method returns true if and only if x and y refer to the same object (x == y has the value true). <br/> Note that it is generally necessary to override the hashCode method whenever this method is overridden, so as to maintain the general contract for the hashCode method, which states that equal objects must have equal hash codes. (docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/…) – Abhijeet Jul 6 '16 at 13:20
  • How to get memory reference of a String variable? – MAX Feb 26 '17 at 9:02
98

With respect to the String class:

The equals() method compares the "value" inside String instances (on the heap) irrespective if the two object references refer to the same String instance or not. If any two object references of type String refer to the same String instance then great! If the two object references refer to two different String instances .. it doesn't make a difference. Its the "value" (that is: the contents of the character array) inside each String instance that is being compared.

On the other hand, the "==" operator compares the value of two object references to see whether they refer to the same String instance. If the value of both object references "refer to" the same String instance then the result of the boolean expression would be "true"..duh. If, on the other hand, the value of both object references "refer to" different String instances (even though both String instances have identical "values", that is, the contents of the character arrays of each String instance are the same) the result of the boolean expression would be "false".

As with any explanation, let it sink in.

I hope this clears things up a bit.

  • so for strings == is reference equals aswell? ie works the same as for other objects? – JonnyRaa Feb 20 '14 at 14:12
  • 2
    (Thread necromancy, I know...) For Strings, == is reference equals as well, yes, but it usually works (as in two Strings with the same content will usually be == to each other), because of how Java handles Strings. It won't always, and it's certainly bad practice, but it's a common mistake, particularly from people coming from other languages. – Tonio Oct 3 '14 at 22:33
  • 4
    To add on to Tonio's comment. String build from string literal will be added to something called the String constant pool, e.g. String s1 = "someString"; String s2 = "someString;" both s1 & s2 will share the same reference. s1 == s2 will return true. But if they were constructed via the String constructor, e.g. String s1 = new String("someString"); String s2 = new String("someString"); then they will not share the same reference. s1 == s2 will return false. – Gavin Nov 15 '17 at 14:25
54

There are some small differences depending whether you are talking about "primitives" or "Object Types"; the same can be said if you are talking about "static" or "non-static" members; you can also mix all the above...

Here is an example (you can run it):

public final class MyEqualityTest
{
    public static void main( String args[] )
    {
        String s1 = new String( "Test" );
        String s2 = new String( "Test" );

        System.out.println( "\n1 - PRIMITIVES ");
        System.out.println( s1 == s2 ); // false
        System.out.println( s1.equals( s2 )); // true

        A a1 = new A();
        A a2 = new A();

        System.out.println( "\n2 - OBJECT TYPES / STATIC VARIABLE" );
        System.out.println( a1 == a2 ); // false
        System.out.println( a1.s == a2.s ); // true
        System.out.println( a1.s.equals( a2.s ) ); // true

        B b1 = new B();
        B b2 = new B();

        System.out.println( "\n3 - OBJECT TYPES / NON-STATIC VARIABLE" );
        System.out.println( b1 == b2 ); // false
        System.out.println( b1.getS() == b2.getS() ); // false
        System.out.println( b1.getS().equals( b2.getS() ) ); // true
    }
}

final class A
{
    // static
    public static String s;
    A()
    {
        this.s = new String( "aTest" );
    }
}

final class B
{
    private String s;
    B()
    {
        this.s = new String( "aTest" );
    }

    public String getS()
    {
        return s;
    }

}

You can compare the explanations for "==" (Equality Operator) and ".equals(...)" (method in the java.lang.Object class) through these links:

  • 2
    Interesting example. Different perspective from the above answers. Thanks! – Andrew Mar 11 '15 at 15:30
  • Best answer in my opinion, as it's clearer than the other full-text answers without losing the explanation (if you undertand class and static concepts, of course) – Carrm Aug 30 '17 at 9:31
41

The difference between == and equals confused me for sometime until I decided to have a closer look at it. Many of them say that for comparing string you should use equals and not ==. Hope in this answer I will be able to say the difference.

The best way to answer this question will be by asking a few questions to yourself. so let's start:

What is the output for the below program:

String mango = "mango";
String mango2 = "mango";
System.out.println(mango != mango2);
System.out.println(mango == mango2);

if you say,

false
true

I will say you are right but why did you say that? and If you say the output is,

true
false

I will say you are wrong but I will still ask you, why you think that is right?

Ok, Let's try to answer this one:

What is the output for the below program:

String mango = "mango";
String mango3 = new String("mango");
System.out.println(mango != mango3);
System.out.println(mango == mango3);

Now If you say,

false
true

I will say you are wrong but why is it wrong now? the correct output for this program is

true
false

Please compare the above program and try to think about it.

Ok. Now this might help (please read this : print the address of object - not possible but still we can use it.)

String mango = "mango";
String mango2 = "mango";
String mango3 = new String("mango");
System.out.println(mango != mango2);
System.out.println(mango == mango2);
System.out.println(mango3 != mango2);
System.out.println(mango3 == mango2);
// mango2 = "mang";
System.out.println(mango+" "+ mango2);
System.out.println(mango != mango2);
System.out.println(mango == mango2);

System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(mango));
System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(mango2));
System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(mango3));

can you just try to think about the output of the last three lines in the code above: for me ideone printed this out (you can check the code here):

false
true
true
false
mango mango
false
true
17225372
17225372
5433634

Oh! Now you see the identityHashCode(mango) is equal to identityHashCode(mango2) But it is not equal to identityHashCode(mango3)

Even though all the string variables - mango, mango2 and mango3 - have the same value, which is "mango", identityHashCode() is still not the same for all.

Now try to uncomment this line // mango2 = "mang"; and run it again this time you will see all three identityHashCode() are different. Hmm that is a helpful hint

we know that if hashcode(x)=N and hashcode(y)=N => x is equal to y

I am not sure how java works internally but I assume this is what happened when I said:

mango = "mango";

java created a string "mango" which was pointed(referenced) by the variable mango something like this

mango ----> "mango"

Now in the next line when I said:

mango2 = "mango";

It actually reused the same string "mango" which looks something like this

mango ----> "mango" <---- mango2

Both mango and mango2 pointing to the same reference Now when I said

mango3 = new String("mango")

It actually created a completely new reference(string) for "mango". which looks something like this,

mango -----> "mango" <------ mango2

mango3 ------> "mango"

and that's why when I put out the values for mango == mango2, it put out true. and when I put out the value for mango3 == mango2, it put out false (even when the values were the same).

and when you uncommented the line // mango2 = "mang"; It actually created a string "mang" which turned our graph like this:

mango ---->"mango"
mango2 ----> "mang"
mango3 -----> "mango"

This is why the identityHashCode is not the same for all.

Hope this helps you guys. Actually, I wanted to generate a test case where == fails and equals() pass. Please feel free to comment and let me know If I am wrong.

  • Does the mango == mango2 happen because you didn't create mango2 as a new String object, and instead just directly referenced "mango"? – brt Jul 23 '17 at 16:49
  • wrong example to use String to clear doubts on == and equals, String when not used with new are put into String Pool and whenever same string is assigned to new reference it points to same string in pool. So probably use some custom object example for == and .equals() comparison. – om252345 Jun 15 '18 at 1:35
29

The == operator tests whether two variables have the same references (aka pointer to a memory address).

String foo = new String("abc");
String bar = new String("abc");

if(foo==bar)
// False (The objects are not the same)

bar = foo;

if(foo==bar)
// True (Now the objects are the same)

Whereas the equals() method tests whether two variables refer to objects that have the same state (values).

String foo = new String("abc");
String bar = new String("abc");

if(foo.equals(bar))
// True (The objects are identical but not same)

Cheers :-)

  • 1
    Wrong. if(foo==bar) this should be true not false. It will reused the same string "adc". Test it in a sandbox, it will return true for both. – Johnathan Logan Apr 12 '17 at 4:39
  • 2
    @JohnathanLogan I guess its due to string interning. Now I have changed to "new String("abc")". Hope now there won't be any issues. Thanks for informing. – dheeran Apr 13 '17 at 18:28
12

You will have to override the equals function (along with others) to use this with custom classes.

The equals method compares the objects.

The == binary operator compares memory addresses.

7

Both == and .equals() refers to the same object if you don't override .equals().

Its your wish what you want to do once you override .equals(). You can compare the invoking object's state with the passed in object's state or you can just call super.equals()

5

Just remember that .equals(...) has to be implemented by the class you are trying to compare. Otherwise, there isn't much of a point; the version of the method for the Object class does the same thing as the comparison operation: Object#equals.

The only time you really want to use the comparison operator for objects is wen you are comparing Enums. This is because there is only one instance of an Enum value at a time. For instance, given the enum

enum FooEnum {A, B, C}

You will never have more than one instance of A at a time, and the same for B and C. This means that you can actually write a method like so:

public boolean compareFoos(FooEnum x, FooEnum y)
{
    return (x == y);
}

And you will have no problems whatsoever.

5
 String w1 ="Sarat";
 String w2 ="Sarat";
 String w3 = new String("Sarat");

 System.out.println(w1.hashCode());   //3254818
 System.out.println(w2.hashCode());   //3254818
 System.out.println(w3.hashCode());   //3254818

 System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(w1)); //prints 705927765
 System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(w2)); //prints 705927765
 System.out.println(System.identityHashCode(w3)); //prints 366712642


 if(w1==w2)   //  (705927765==705927765)
 {
   System.out.println("true");
 }
 else
 {
   System.out.println("false");
 }
 //prints true

 if(w2==w3)   //  (705927765==366712642)
 {
   System.out.println("true");
 }
 else
 {
   System.out.println("false");
 }
 //prints false


 if(w2.equals(w3))   //  (Content of 705927765== Content of 366712642)
 {
   System.out.println("true");
 }
 else
 {
   System.out.println("false");
 }
 //prints true
5

== is an operator and equals() is a method.

Operators are generally used for primitive type comparisons and thus == is used for memory address comparison and equals() method is used for comparing objects.

5

The == operator:

The == is a relational operator in Java that is used to compare two operands. It is used to determine whether the two operands are equal or not. Using the == operator, you can compare any primitive type such as int, char, float and Booleans. After comparison, the == operator returns a boolean value. If the two operands are equal, the == operator returns a true value. However, if the two operands are not equal, it returns a false value. When used with objects, the == operator compares the two object references and determines whether they refer to the same instance.

The .equals() Method

equals() is a method available in the String class that is used to compare two strings and determine whether they are equal. This method returns a boolean value as a result of the comparison. If the two strings contain the same characters in the same order, the equals() method returns true. Otherwise, it returns a false value.

3

Also note that .equals() normally contains == for testing as this is the first thing you would wish to test for if you wanted to test if two objects are equal.

And == actually does look at values for primitive types, for objects it checks the reference.

3

When you evaluate the code, it is very clear that (==) compares according to memory address, while equals(Object o) compares hashCode() of the instances. That's why it is said do not break the contract between equals() and hashCode() if you do not face surprises later.

    String s1 = new String("Ali");
    String s2 = new String("Veli");
    String s3 = new String("Ali");

    System.out.println(s1.hashCode());
    System.out.println(s2.hashCode());
    System.out.println(s3.hashCode());


    System.out.println("(s1==s2):" + (s1 == s2));
    System.out.println("(s1==s3):" + (s1 == s3));


    System.out.println("s1.equals(s2):" + (s1.equals(s2)));
    System.out.println("s1.equal(s3):" + (s1.equals(s3)));


    /*Output 
    96670     
    3615852
    96670
    (s1==s2):false
    (s1==s3):false
    s1.equals(s2):false
    s1.equal(s3):true
    */
3

The major difference between == and equals() is

1) == is used to compare primitives.

For example :

        String string1 = "Ravi";
        String string2 = "Ravi";
        String string3 = new String("Ravi");
        String string4 = new String("Prakash");

        System.out.println(string1 == string2); // true because same reference in string pool
        System.out.println(string1 == string3); // false

2) equals() is used to compare objects. For example :

        System.out.println(string1.equals(string2)); // true equals() comparison of values in the objects
        System.out.println(string1.equals(string3)); // true
        System.out.println(string1.equals(string4)); // false
2

== can be used in many object types but you can use Object.equals for any type , especially Strings and Google Map Markers.

2

== operator always reference is compared. But in case of

equals() method

it's depends's on implementation if we are overridden equals method than it compares object on basic of implementation given in overridden method.

 class A
 {
   int id;
   String str;

     public A(int id,String str)
     {
       this.id=id;
       this.str=str;
     }

    public static void main(String arg[])
    {
      A obj=new A(101,"sam");
      A obj1=new A(101,"sam");

      obj.equals(obj1)//fasle
      obj==obj1 // fasle
    }
 }

in above code both obj and obj1 object contains same data but reference is not same so equals return false and == also. but if we overridden equals method than

 class A
 {
   int id;
   String str;

     public A(int id,String str)
     {
       this.id=id;
       this.str=str;
     }
    public boolean equals(Object obj)
    {
       A a1=(A)obj;
      return this.id==a1.id;
    }

    public static void main(String arg[])
    {
      A obj=new A(101,"sam");
      A obj1=new A(101,"sam");

      obj.equals(obj1)//true
      obj==obj1 // fasle
    }
 }

know check out it will return true and false for same case only we overridden

equals method .

it compare object on basic of content(id) of object

but ==

still compare references of object.

2
public class StringPool {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String s1 = "Cat";// will create reference in string pool of heap memory
    String s2 = "Cat";
    String s3 = new String("Cat");//will create a object in heap memory

    // Using == will give us true because same reference in string pool

    if (s1 == s2) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }

    // Using == with reference and Object will give us False

    if (s1 == s3) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("false");
    }

    // Using .equals method which refers to value

    if (s1.equals(s3)) {
        System.out.println("true");
    } else {
        System.out.println("False");
    }

    }
  }

----Output----- true false true

2

It may be worth adding that for wrapper objects for primitive types - i.e. Int, Long, Double - == will return true if the two values are equal.

Long a = 10L;
Long b = 10L;

if (a == b) {
    System.out.println("Wrapped primitives behave like values");
}

To contrast, putting the above two Longs into two separate ArrayLists, equals sees them as the same, but == doesn't.

ArrayList<Long> c = new ArrayList<>();
ArrayList<Long> d = new ArrayList<>();

c.add(a);
d.add(b);
if (c == d) System.out.println("No way!");
if (c.equals(d)) System.out.println("Yes, this is true.");
  • Wrapper objects for primitive types - i.e. Integer, Long, Double == may not return true even if the two values are equal. It purely depends on Wrapper's cache. Below code will print false because default cache is limited to -128 to 127. Long a = 128l; Long b = 128l; System.out.println(a == b); – Neetesh Bhardwaj May 6 at 8:39
0

The String pool (aka interning) and Integer pool blur the difference further, and may allow you to use == for objects in some cases instead of .equals

This can give you greater performance (?), at the cost of greater complexity.

E.g.:

assert "ab" == "a" + "b";

Integer i = 1;
Integer j = i;
assert i == j;

Complexity tradeoff: the following may surprise you:

assert new String("a") != new String("a");

Integer i = 128;
Integer j = 128;
assert i != j;

I advise you to stay away from such micro-optimization, and always use .equals for objects, and == for primitives:

assert (new String("a")).equals(new String("a"));

Integer i = 128;
Integer j = 128;
assert i.equals(j);
0

Basically, == compares if two objects have the same reference on the heap, so unless two references are linked to the same object, this comparison will be false.

equals() is a method inherited from Object class. This method by default compares if two objects have the same referece. It means:

object1.equals(object2) <=> object1 == object2

However, if you want to establish equality between two objects of the same class you should override this method. It is also very important to override the method hashCode() if you have overriden equals().

Implement hashCode() when establishing equality is part of the Java Object Contract. If you are working with collections, and you haven't implemented hashCode(), Strange Bad Things could happen:

HashMap<Cat, String> cats = new HashMap<>();
Cat cat = new Cat("molly");
cats.put(cat, "This is a cool cat");
System.out.println(cats.get(new Cat("molly"));

null will be printed after executing the previous code if you haven't implemented hashCode().

0

Since Java doesn’t support operator overloading, == behaves identical for every object but equals() is method, which can be overridden in Java and logic to compare objects can be changed based upon business rules.

Main difference between == and equals in Java is that "==" is used to compare primitives while equals() method is recommended to check equality of objects.

String comparison is a common scenario of using both == and equals method. Since java.lang.String class override equals method, It return true if two String object contains same content but == will only return true if two references are pointing to same object.

Here is an example of comparing two Strings in Java for equality using == and equals() method which will clear some doubts:

public class TEstT{

    public static void main(String[] args) {

String text1 = new String("apple");
String text2 = new String("apple");

//since two strings are different object result should be false
boolean result = text1 == text2;
System.out.println("Comparing two strings with == operator: " + result);

//since strings contains same content , equals() should return true
result = text1.equals(text2);
System.out.println("Comparing two Strings with same content using equals method: " + result);

text2 = text1;
//since both text2 and text1d reference variable are pointing to same object
//"==" should return true
result = (text1 == text2);
System.out.println("Comparing two reference pointing to same String with == operator: " + result);

}
}
0

In short, the answer is "Yes".

In Java, the == operator compares the two objects to see if they point to the same memory location; while the .equals() method actually compares the two objects to see if they have the same object value.

protected by Brad Larson Mar 24 '15 at 13:54

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