42

I'm trying not to use the ',' char as a thousand separator when displaying a string, but to use a space instead. I guess I need to define a custom culture, but I don't seem to get it right. Any pointers?

eg: display 1000000 as 1 000 000 instead of 1,000,000

(no, String.Replace() is not the solution I'd like to use :P)

5
  • What's wrong with using String.Replace()?
    – Jon B
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 15:12
  • 1
    @Jon B - because Replace wouldn't be culture independent. What if your running on a computer where the thousand sep is . ? Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 15:17
  • and since I'm already formatting the number, it'd be cluttering the code
    – Luk
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 15:21
  • @Peter - I belive you could use InvariantCulture and then do String.Replace(). I'm not arguing this as a good solution, I was just curious why the OP was opposed to it.
    – Jon B
    Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 15:22
  • Because it is a hack? Commented Mar 13, 2015 at 9:40

5 Answers 5

79

I suggest you find a NumberFormatInfo which most closely matches what you want (i.e. it's right apart from the thousands separator), call Clone() on it and then set the NumberGroupSeparator property. (If you're going to format the numbers using currency formats, you need to change CurrencyGroupSeparator instead/as well.) Use that as the format info for your calls to string.Format etc, and you should be fine. For example:

using System;
using System.Globalization;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        NumberFormatInfo nfi = (NumberFormatInfo)
            CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.NumberFormat.Clone();
        nfi.NumberGroupSeparator = " ";

        Console.WriteLine(12345.ToString("n", nfi)); // 12 345.00
    }
}
2
  • That Skeet brand LoadBalancer has routing issues? Commented Apr 15, 2009 at 15:15
  • This helps me out massively. Superb!
    – Oppdal
    Commented Nov 24, 2011 at 16:15
9

Create your own NumberFormatInfo (derivative) with a different thousand separator.

7

There's a slightly simpler version of Jon Skeet one :

using System;
using System.Globalization;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        NumberFormatInfo nfi = new NumberFormatInfo {NumberGroupSeparator = " ", NumberDecimalDigits = 0};

        Console.WriteLine(12345678.ToString("n", nfi)); // 12 345 678
    }
}

And the 'nfi' initialization could be skipped and put directly as parameter into the ToString() method.

1
  • That's basically John Skeet's answer rewritten. Not exactly creative or shorter! Commented Jul 7, 2016 at 12:53
3

Easiest way...

num.ToString("### ### ### ### ##0.00")
1
  • 6
    Although this works it will actually produce spaces in front of the number. For example the number 1 would have 4 spaces in front of it. So at least you will have to trim it. I think the best solution is to adjust the NumberFormatInfo if you want to override the Culture default format.
    – Johncl
    Commented Oct 4, 2011 at 7:20
0

I wanted to

  • have space as a thousand separator,
  • have up to two decimals and
  • optionally be negative.

This code solves it:

var regex = new Regex(@"(^|(?<=-))\s*");
var format = "### ### ### ### ##0.##";
decimal number = 123456789.54m;
var str = regex.Replace(number.ToString(format), ""); // str = "123 456 789.54"

Here are examples of how this behaves for various numbers:

regex.Replace(0m.ToString(format), "")
"0"
regex.Replace(123m.ToString(format), "")
"123"
regex.Replace(123456789m.ToString(format), "")
"123 456 789"
regex.Replace(123456789.1m.ToString(format), "")
"123 456 789.1"
regex.Replace(123456789.12m.ToString(format), "")
"123 456 789.12"
regex.Replace(123456789.1234m.ToString(format), "")
"123 456 789.12"
regex.Replace((-123456789.1234m).ToString(format), "")
"-123 456 789.12"
regex.Replace((-1234m).ToString(format), "")
"-1 234"
regex.Replace((-1m).ToString(format), "")
"-1"

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