3
//...
if( strcmp( str, "January" ) == 0 )
    month = 1;
else if( strcmp( str, "February") == 0 )
    month = 2;
//...

Q: Is there any more efficient way of determining that, for instance, "April" is the fourth month of the year? Repeated calls to strcmp() must be terribly inefficient, and if/else ladders tedious to code. Sometimes it's "March" and sometimes it's abbreviated as "MAR"... There must be a better way...

Putting the known strings in a sorted array of structs would allow, at least, binary searching, but still involves a lot of guesswork from the code.

6
  • 2
    Look up gperf to generate a perfect hash of the keys ahead of time.
    – Shawn
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 4:46
  • 1
    It might be worthwhile to construct a trie and use that to do quick lookups: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trie Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 4:49
  • 4
    Sure. You can put the month/numbers in a table in month alpha order and use binary search. But that's just the simplest way. Lookup in a static set has been very well studied. Some fancier options are a perfect hash function (try searching for the Gnu tool gperf), an optimal binary search tree, or a trie. But don't be too quick to optimize. For only 12 elements the difference between the if chain and these "more efficient" ways is unlikely to make a real difference. Simplicity has its own value.
    – Gene
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 4:50
  • 1
    @Shawn Thanks for the pointer. gperf looks interesting, but larger than the quick (and specific) hashing functions discovered and posted in the answer below. Posted this at the suggestion that it might be useful to someone, somewhere, sometime. Cheers!...
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 5:01
  • 1
    A good compromise between efficiency and readability is usually to toss all constant string literals into a sorted table, then binary search through it. In this specific case there's just 12 strings to compare with, so (depending on system) it's quite likely that a brute force for loop calling strcmp is actually the most efficient.
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 7:58

3 Answers 3

7

This is a Can I answer my own question? answer. Other answers are welcomed.


There are several ways of translating an arbitrary string from a finite set of strings ("keywords") to a concise, useable form. Most of these involve an iterative (or a sub-optimal linear, or an expensive branching) search involving repeated comparisons (that may also need to account for case insensitivity.)

The 12 (English) month names form such a set. A quick and small hashing function for translation of month name to month ordinal is presented below.

A response to my response to a recent question suggested "sharing" an (admittedly arcane) hashing function that, with awareness of false positives, returns the month ordinal (1-12) when passed a string containing the name of a month (English) in 7-bit ASCII. The function performs primitive operations on the 2nd & 3rd character and out pops the function's hash value of the string (tuned to be the month's ordinal value.)

  • "January", "jan" and "JAN" all return the value 1.
  • "feb", "FEBRUARY" and "Feb" all return the value 2.
static int monthOrd( char cp[] ) {
    return "DIE@CB@LJF@HAG@K"[ cp[1]/4&7 ^ cp[2]*2 &0xF ] &0xF;
}

The operations of the hashing were uncovered through a brute force permutation of a number of primitive operations seeking a combination that would return 12 different values between 0x0 and 0xF (4 bits). The reader is encouraged to take apart each step of the mangling of the bits of the two ASCII characters. This result was not "invented", but was "discovered".

After the bits of two characters have been mangled, the value is used as an index into a string (aka "a cheap LUT") whose 12 letters A-L are positioned such that "?an" (January) will mangle to an index for the letter 'A'. Masking the low 4 bits of that ASCII character yields the value 1 as the ordinal for the string "JANUARY"... 1 is the return value when the function is passed variations of the string "Jan". Likewise for the other 11 month names.

NB: Using this function allows the caller to check that the string is indeed "JAN", "jan", "January" as suits the application. The caller need not try to match any of the names of the other 11 months. This function WILL return the false positive value 1 for the strings "Random" or "CANCEL", so the caller need only validate against a single month's name (length and case appropriate to the application.)


Day names
Here is an equivalent function that converts "Sun(day)" (case insensitive) to 1, "MON" to 2, "tue" to 3, etc...

static int wkdayOrd( char cp[] ) {
    return "65013427"[*cp/2 + ~cp[1] & 0x7] & 0x7;
}

Again, the caller must confirm the string against only ONE day's name, appropriate to their source data, to avoid "false positives".

Note: only the first two letters are used, so "Su", "Mo", "Tu", ... would be sufficient for this function to process.


Number names
Here is an equivalent function for "zero" to "ten", again case insensitive. (Number names are not abbreviated like month names or day names.)

static int numberOrd( char cp[] ) {
    return "@~IBAH~FCGE~~DJ~"[ ( cp[0] ^ cp[1]/2 + cp[2]*4 ) & 0xF ] & 0xF;
}

Zodiac names

static int ZodiacOrd( char cp[] ) {
    return "BJGA@@HIECK@@DLF"[(cp[0]/2 ^ (cp[1]/2&1) + cp[2]*2) & 0xF] & 0xF;
}

Passed the name (case ambivalent) of one of the twelve Zodiac signs, this returns the ordinal of that star sign ("Aries" = 1, ...) Again, like any hashing function, there will be collisions with other strings. The caller need only subsequently check against a single known string; not twelve.


Alternative (64 bit) version with exposition
An improvement to monthOrd() has revealed itself. The code above uses (16+1) bytes for its string LUT; the code below uses half of that. For posterity, the scheme is explained, with examples provided.

NB: monthOrd() (above) returns 1-12 for a valid month name (or false positive) and 0 for other hash values in the range 0-15. Below returns 0-11 for valid month names (conforming to struct tm convention) and 12 for each of the four other hashes in the range 0-15. False positives don't magically go away.

/*
'#' denotes hashing the ASCII values of 2nd & 3rd letters

Apr: (p#r) =>  0   /want    3 = 0011 -> 0x3
Sep: (e#p) =>  1   /want    8 = 1000 -> 0x8
May: (a#y) =>  2   /want    4 = 0100 -> 0x4
---: (-#-) =>  3   /dont care = 1100 -> 0xc // 12 out of range
Mar: (a#r) =>  4   /want    2 = 0010 -> 0x2
Feb: (e#b) =>  5   /want    1 = 0001 -> 0x1
---: (-#-) =>  6   /dont care = 1100 -> 0xc // 12 out of range
Dec: (e#c) =>  7   /want   11 = 1011 -> 0xB
Oct: (c#t) =>  8   /want    9 = 1001 -> 0x9
Jun: (u#n) =>  9   /want    5 = 0101 -> 0x5
---: (-#-) => 10   /dont care = 1100 -> 0xc // 12 out of range
Aug: (u#g) => 11   /want    7 = 0111 -> 0x7
Jan: (a#n) => 12   /want    0 = 0000 -> 0x0
Jul: (u#l) => 13   /want    6 = 0110 -> 0x6
---: (-#-) => 14   /dont care = 1100 -> 0xc // 12 out of range
Nov: (o#v) => 15   /want   10 = 1010 -> 0xA

==>> uint64_t LUT = 0xAc607c59Bc12c483;
*/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main( void ) {
    const uint64_t LUT = 0xAc607c59Bc12c483;

    char *mon[] = {
        "jan", "feb", "mar", "apr", "may", "jun",
        "JUL", "AUG", "SEP", "OCT", "NOV", "DEC",
        NULL
    };

    for( char **pm = mon; *pm; pm++ ) {
    //  char a = pm[0][0]; // irrelevant
        char b = pm[0][1];
        char c = pm[0][2];

        int bmngl  = b >> 2 & 0x7; // mangle the bits of 2nd character
        int cmngl  = c << 1;       // mangle the bits of 3rd character
        int LUTidx = bmngl ^ cmngl & 0xF; // combine and mask

        int rShift = 4 * LUTidx; // will right shift LUT 4*n bits

        int monOrd = (int)( LUT >> rShift ) & 0xF; // shift and mask

        printf("%s: hash = %2d ==> LU1 = %2d, LU2 = %2d, LU3 = %2d\n",
            pm[0],
            LUTidx,
            monOrd,
            // casting to int simulates return: int monthOrd( char *name );
            (int)( LUT >> 4 * ( ( b / 4 & 7 ) ^ ( c * 2 ) & 15 ) & 15 ),
            (int)( LUT>>4*(b/4&7^c*2&15)&15 ) // confident of precedence
        );
    }

    puts( "\nFalse positives:" );
    char *junk[] = { "COVID-19", "junk", "technical", "fopbar", NULL };

    /*
     * The hash function appears below as the 3rd parameter of printf()
     */

    for( char **pj = junk; *pj; pj++ ) {
        char b = pj[0][1];
        char c = pj[0][2];
        printf("%10s: LU = %2d\n", pj[0], (int)( LUT>>4*(b/4&7^c*2&15)&15 ) );
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

jan: hash = 12 ==> LU1 =  0, LU2 =  0, LU3 =  0
feb: hash =  5 ==> LU1 =  1, LU2 =  1, LU3 =  1
mar: hash =  4 ==> LU1 =  2, LU2 =  2, LU3 =  2
apr: hash =  0 ==> LU1 =  3, LU2 =  3, LU3 =  3
may: hash =  2 ==> LU1 =  4, LU2 =  4, LU3 =  4
jun: hash =  9 ==> LU1 =  5, LU2 =  5, LU3 =  5
JUL: hash = 13 ==> LU1 =  6, LU2 =  6, LU3 =  6
AUG: hash = 11 ==> LU1 =  7, LU2 =  7, LU3 =  7
SEP: hash =  1 ==> LU1 =  8, LU2 =  8, LU3 =  8
OCT: hash =  8 ==> LU1 =  9, LU2 =  9, LU3 =  9
NOV: hash = 15 ==> LU1 = 10, LU2 = 10, LU3 = 10
DEC: hash =  7 ==> LU1 = 11, LU2 = 11, LU3 = 11

False positives:
  COVID-19: LU = 10 // not "November" or any other month name
      junk: LU =  5 // not "June" or any other month name
 technical: LU = 11 // not "December" or any other month name
    fopbar: LU = 12 // outside of range 0-11. definitely not a month name!

Update:
Inspired by the clarity of code in the recent answer by @chrqlie, there's this... It compiles to the same amount of assembler, but doesn't have the baggage of additional data. (Requiring a 64bit machine, it's probably not suitable for MCUs.) Again, the size of the LUT is only 8 bytes...

static int monthOrd( char *mn ) {
/*
 * Branchless hashing function
 */
#define HASH(a,b,c) ((((b + b + c)&15) - ((b & 3) == 3))*4)

    /*
     * compile-time initialisation of one uint64_t
     */
    static const uint64_t LUT
        = (uint64_t) 1 << HASH('j','a','n')
        | (uint64_t) 2 << HASH('f','e','b')
        | (uint64_t) 3 << HASH('m','a','r')
        | (uint64_t) 4 << HASH('a','p','r')
        | (uint64_t) 5 << HASH('m','a','y')
        | (uint64_t) 6 << HASH('j','u','n')
        | (uint64_t) 7 << HASH('j','u','l')
        | (uint64_t) 8 << HASH('a','u','g')
        | (uint64_t) 9 << HASH('s','e','p')
        | (uint64_t)10 << HASH('o','c','t')
        | (uint64_t)11 << HASH('n','o','v')
        | (uint64_t)12 << HASH('d','e','c')
        ;

    /*
     * Branchless run-time hashing of passed string
     */
    return -1 + (0xF & (int)(LUT >> HASH('x', mn[1], mn[2])));
#undef HASH
}

The first version of monthOrd() calculated a 4 bit hash and returned 0 for 4/16 cases where the passed string bore no resemblance to the name of a month (a true negative). It returned 1-12 for 12/16 true positive and false positive cases. This was 'improved' in a later version, returning 0-11 to follow the convention of struct tm. Unfortunately, this meant the caller would have to use strcmp() to discern "Jan(uary)" (0) from the 4 true negative return values (also 0.) Not good!

The most recent version still returns the desired 0-11 for the 12 hashed month names (including false positives). This version now returns -1 for the 4/16 true negative cases. The caller need not invoke strcmp() when monthOrd( str ) returns -1.

11
  • 1
    return "DIE@CB@LJF@HAG@K"[ cp[1]/4&7 ^ cp[2]*2 &0xF ] &0xF; did you try to pass peers review? What did they say? Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 10:43
  • 1
    @CostantinoGrana Thank you for the UV... There will have to be at least one "verification" that the unknown string matches a known string. Loops & branching aren't cheap. This "branchless" determination of the only potential match to verify the unknown shaves cycles. I first wrote something like this (simpler with a larger LUT) 40 years ago for a PDP11/34. It meant the job was completed and purged involving less wasteful swapping on that 1/2Mb of core system.
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 10:48
  • 1
    @JimMischel This might be more useful than it might seem at a glance. Standard C does for example offer you the possibility to get a compile-time time stamp of when your code was compiled, through the __DATE__ constant. Which would be very useful on many occasions, if it wasn't using such a brain-damaged format: "Jan 27 2023" as a string literal. In several projects I've needed to place a time stamp into resource-constrained firmware, but the string literal was simply not helpful since it can't get used in calculations. So off I go to macro hell, to come back with some abomination... ->
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 27, 2023 at 7:31
  • 1
    In these situations a quick look-up in run-time wouldn't be a problem, since you are about to do some calculation based on the date anyway.
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 27, 2023 at 7:31
  • 1
    @ilkkachu I "invented" monthOrd() to solve a real problem when core memory was really cores measured in Kb and cycle times measured in 10's of uS... It served a real purpose.. The others are recent play to pass some time.
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Sep 26, 2023 at 20:19
5

I've checked what happens with gperf passing it all months as "January", "Jan", "JANUARY", "JAN", "january", "jan", and so on.

struct months {
char *name;
int number;
};

#define TOTAL_KEYWORDS 69
#define MIN_WORD_LENGTH 3
#define MAX_WORD_LENGTH 9
#define MIN_HASH_VALUE 3
#define MAX_HASH_VALUE 218
/* maximum key range = 216, duplicates = 0 */

#ifdef __GNUC__
__inline
#else
#ifdef __cplusplus
inline
#endif
#endif
static unsigned int
hash (register const char *str, register size_t len)
{
  static unsigned char asso_values[] =
    {
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219,  10,  80,  75,  95,   5,
      125,  95, 219, 219,   5, 219,  95,  55,  45,  60,
       60, 219,  85,  95,  50,  90,  25, 219, 219,  12,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,   0,  40,  35,
       35,  35,  40,  25, 219, 219,   0, 219,  10,  50,
        0,  25,  15, 219,  15,  35,  30,  10,  25, 219,
      219,  25, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219,
      219, 219, 219, 219, 219, 219
    };
  return len + asso_values[(unsigned char)str[2]] + asso_values[(unsigned char)str[1]] + asso_values[(unsigned char)str[0]];
}

struct months *
in_word_set (register const char *str, register size_t len)
{
  static struct months wordlist[] =
    {
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"jan",1},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"january",1},
      {"Jan",1},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"January",1},
      {"jun",6},
      {"june",6},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"Jun",6},
      {"June",6},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"jul",7},
      {"july",7},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"Jul",7},
      {"July",7},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"apr",4},
      {""},
      {"april",4},
      {""}, {""},
      {"aug",8},
      {""}, {""},
      {"august",8},
      {""},
      {"Apr",4},
      {""},
      {"April",4},
      {""}, {""},
      {"Aug",8},
      {""}, {""},
      {"August",8},
      {""},
      {"nov",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"november",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"JAN",1},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"JANUARY",1},
      {"mar",3},
      {""},
      {"march",3},
      {""}, {""},
      {"Mar",3},
      {""},
      {"March",3},
      {""}, {""},
      {"may",5},
      {""},
      {"MAY",5},
      {""}, {""},
      {"May",5},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"sep",9},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"oct",10},
      {"september",9},
      {""}, {""},
      {"october",10},
      {"Nov",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"November",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"dec",12},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"december",12},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"feb",2},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"february",2},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"Oct",10},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"October",10},
      {"NOV",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"NOVEMBER",11},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"JUN",6},
      {"JUNE",6},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"Sep",9},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"MAR",3},
      {"September",9},
      {"MARCH",3},
      {""}, {""},
      {"APR",4},
      {""},
      {"APRIL",4},
      {""}, {""},
      {"SEP",9},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"Dec",12},
      {"SEPTEMBER",9},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"December",12},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"DEC",12},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"DECEMBER",12},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"OCT",10},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"OCTOBER",10},
      {"JUL",7},
      {"JULY",7},
      {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"AUG",8},
      {""}, {""},
      {"AUGUST",8},
      {""},
      {"Feb",2},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"February",2},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"FEB",2},
      {""}, {""}, {""}, {""},
      {"FEBRUARY",2}
    };

  if (len <= MAX_WORD_LENGTH && len >= MIN_WORD_LENGTH)
    {
      register unsigned int key = hash (str, len);

      if (key <= MAX_HASH_VALUE)
        {
          register const char *s = wordlist[key].name;

          if (*str == *s && !strcmp (str + 1, s + 1))
            return &wordlist[key];
        }
    }
  return 0;
}

I guess this is pretty fast and requires only one strcmp per string. This is exactly what is used in GCC for keyword checking.

A very nice introduction to gperf is available here.

0
2

Here is a simple solution that should be more efficient and will check for proper spelling:

#include <string.h>

int get_month_number(const char *s) {
    if (s && s[0] && s[1]) {
        switch (s[2]) {
          case 'n': return !strcmp(s, "Jan") || !strcmp(s, "January")   ? 1 :
                           !strcmp(s, "Jun") || !strcmp(s, "June")      ? 6 : 0;
          case 'b': return !strcmp(s, "Feb") || !strcmp(s, "February")  ? 2 : 0;
          case 'r': return !strcmp(s, "Mar") || !strcmp(s, "March")     ? 3 :
                           !strcmp(s, "Apr") || !strcmp(s, "April")     ? 4 : 0;
          case 'y': return !strcmp(s, "May")                            ? 5 : 0;
          case 'l': return !strcmp(s, "Jul") || !strcmp(s, "July")      ? 7 : 0;
          case 'g': return !strcmp(s, "Aug") || !strcmp(s, "August")    ? 8 : 0;
          case 'p': return !strcmp(s, "Sep") || !strcmp(s, "September") ? 9 : 0;
          case 't': return !strcmp(s, "Oct") || !strcmp(s, "October")   ? 10 : 0;
          case 'v': return !strcmp(s, "Nov") || !strcmp(s, "November")  ? 11 : 0;
          case 'c': return !strcmp(s, "Dec") || !strcmp(s, "December")  ? 12 : 0;

        }
    }
    return 0;
}

If you can assume that s points to a string of at least 3 characters that represents an English month name in ASCII, abbreviated or not, using any case combination, you can simplify the above code while keeping it readable:

// return the month number 0..11 assuming argument is correct.
int get_month_number(const char *s) {
#define HASH(a,b,c)  ((((b) | 0x20) == 'a') + ((c) & 0x1f))
    switch (HASH(s[0],s[1],s[2])) {
      default:
      case HASH('J','a','n'): return 0;
      case HASH('F','e','b'): return 1;
      case HASH('M','a','r'): return 2;
      case HASH('A','p','r'): return 3;
      case HASH('M','a','y'): return 4;
      case HASH('J','u','n'): return 5;
      case HASH('J','u','l'): return 6;
      case HASH('A','u','g'): return 7;
      case HASH('S','e','p'): return 8;
      case HASH('O','c','t'): return 9;
      case HASH('N','o','v'): return 10;
      case HASH('D','e','c'): return 11;
    }
#undef HASH
}

And here is an alternative with a look up table instead of a switch statement:

// return the month number 0..11 assuming argument is correct.
int get_month_number(const char *s) {
#define HASH(a,b,c)  ((((b) | 0x20) == 'a') + ((c) & 0x1f))
    static const unsigned char month_num[33] = {
        [ HASH('J','a','n') ] = 0,
        [ HASH('F','e','b') ] = 1,
        [ HASH('M','a','r') ] = 2,
        [ HASH('A','p','r') ] = 3,
        [ HASH('M','a','y') ] = 4,
        [ HASH('J','u','n') ] = 5,
        [ HASH('J','u','l') ] = 6,
        [ HASH('A','u','g') ] = 7,
        [ HASH('S','e','p') ] = 8,
        [ HASH('O','c','t') ] = 9,
        [ HASH('N','o','v') ] = 10,
        [ HASH('D','e','c') ] = 11,
    };
    return month_num[HASH(s[0],s[1],s[2])];
#undef HASH
}

As can be seen on Godbolt's Compiler Explorer, both functions generate branchless code with gcc and clang. The switch statement also detects hash collisions for free. Both could use your hash function:

#define HASH(a,b,c)  ((b)/4&7 ^ (c)*2&0xF)
5
  • Requires caller to isolate candidate as as a null terminated string. One, possibly two, and as many as three calls to strcmp() to determine "June". Wanted to eliminate or reduce calls to strcmp()! Does this continue work when the source changes from mixed case to all uppercase? eg "JAN"? And, stricmp() will be more expensive than strcmp()... (Note: my updated answer changes from 1-12 and 0 to struct tm convention of 0-11 using 12 for NAM (ie: definitely not the name of a month! not even close!).)
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Oct 31, 2023 at 22:08
  • My answer leaves determination of "proper spelling" to the caller. If the source of the candidate string is reliable (like the 3 letter month name within __DATE__ in a C program), there's no need to check spelling. Just want the month region of 25 DEC 2023 to be converted to 11 (where Jan == 0)...
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Oct 31, 2023 at 22:21
  • Memory is cheap and abundant (except on embedded systems where it's a significant consideration.) That's why the gperf idea isn't a good general solution. With its 23 string literals, this solution might tax the intended platform's limited resources.
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Oct 31, 2023 at 22:28
  • 1
    @Fe2O3: Your solutions are compact, but impossible to validate without exhaustive analysis. Transposing your approach to other languages is even harder. I amended my answer with alternative versions that combine compactness of code and data with a method that is both readable and easy to validate. I too remember those days where I would spent hours seeking ways to shave off some CPU cycles and a few memory bytes... Thanks for reviving such good memories :)
    – chqrlie
    Commented Oct 31, 2023 at 23:39
  • 1
    It is fun, isn't it? :-)... Both your added solutions are FAR more obvious (than mine) to the reader and more maintainable! Good job! The long-ago version I wrote also used a sparse array like yours, but I hadn't seen the clearer/clever hashing function you've used here. Nice!
    – Fe2O3
    Commented Nov 1, 2023 at 0:43

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