153

The information I need is in a meta tag. How can I access the "content" data of the meta tag when property="video"?

HTML:

<meta property="video" content="http://video.com/video33353.mp4" />
  • 3
    Note that <meta> is supposed to have a name attribute, not property. Developers using the standard attribute will need to adapt the code given by most answers. – Jens Bannmann Jun 6 '17 at 11:53

18 Answers 18

134

You can use this:

function getMeta(metaName) {
  const metas = document.getElementsByTagName('meta');

  for (let i = 0; i < metas.length; i++) {
    if (metas[i].getAttribute('name') === metaName) {
      return metas[i].getAttribute('content');
    }
  }

  return '';
}

console.log(getMeta('video'));
  • 6
    What you really want is 'let' to keep them locally defined ;) – tommed Mar 23 '15 at 21:54
  • 31
    If you can use querySelector, you can do something like this: document.querySelector("meta[property='og:url']").getAttribute('content') – Nishchal Gautam Jun 17 '16 at 1:04
  • 3
    I think this answer is not more relevant and you should really use stackoverflow.com/questions/7524585/… – Sergei Basharov Jan 21 '17 at 17:10
  • Skip this answer. It doesn't work in the OP's [admittedly odd] case since it looks at the "name" rather than "property" attribute. And in its current state it's overly complex but without any backwards compatibility advantage — any browsers that support const/let should support .querySelector! – natevw Feb 28 '20 at 20:57
  • for just one meta attribute, why to loop over multiple times ? it may have hundreds of meta tags or it may need to get the meta value multiple times. – S K R May 11 '20 at 15:21
244

The other answers should probably do the trick, but this one is simpler and does not require jQuery:

document.head.querySelector("[property~=video][content]").content;

The original question used an RDFa tag with a property="" attribute. For the normal HTML <meta name="" …> tags you could use something like:

document.querySelector('meta[name="description"]').content
  • 19
    Simple, elegant and has no dependencies. Better than the accepted answer imo – Raniz Nov 3 '16 at 10:38
  • 6
    Even though my meta is in the <head> tag, document.head.querySelector gave me null but document.querySelector worked perfectly – Robin van Baalen Apr 15 '17 at 15:42
  • 10
    To get it working with OG tags add quotes to it like this_: var title = document.head.querySelector('[property="og:title"]'); – arpo May 8 '17 at 8:21
  • 1
    NIce. Which purpose does the part "[content]" serve? Without it, I also get the meta element. – citykid Apr 30 '19 at 9:28
  • 1
    @citykid It does seem somewhat superfluous. The snippet will always throw a TypeError if the tag is not found by its "property". Including [content] in the selector extends that exception to the case where any matching tag lacks a content attribute. IMO it makes more sense in that case to get a null result but it's up to the implementer's preference I guess. – natevw Feb 28 '20 at 20:49
102

One liner here

document.querySelector("meta[property='og:image']").getAttribute("content");
23

There is an easier way:

document.getElementsByName('name of metatag')[0].getAttribute('content')
  • This works back to at least IE11, which makes it more useful. – rprez Feb 26 '19 at 0:23
  • 1
    The document.querySelector version works all the way to IE8, so it's plenty – fregante Apr 19 '19 at 4:17
  • This is a pretty good way normally, but note that the OP is using the RDFa "property" attribute instead of the more basic "name" attribute (stackoverflow.com/questions/22350105/…) – natevw Feb 28 '20 at 20:35
17
function getMetaContentByName(name,content){
   var content = (content==null)?'content':content;
   return document.querySelector("meta[name='"+name+"']").getAttribute(content);
}

Used in this way:

getMetaContentByName("video");

The example on this page:

getMetaContentByName("twitter:domain");
  • I used this tidbit, but on a certain page was getting a type error as undefined because the meta tag itself was missing. I resolved that by assigning a variable and wrapping the document.queryselector in a try statement so I could get "" by default in case of error. – bgmCoder Jan 14 '16 at 22:32
  • function getMetaContentByName(name,content){ var content = (content==null)?'content':content; try{ return document.querySelector("meta[name='"+name+"']").getAttribute(content); }catch{ return null; } } – devMariusz Nov 27 '19 at 14:16
15

If you use JQuery, you can use:

$("meta[property='video']").attr('content');
  • 9
    Assuming jquery, or some library; not javascript – ILMostro_7 Dec 23 '15 at 22:34
13

In Jquery you can achieve this with:

$("meta[property='video']");

In JavaScript you can achieve this with:

document.getElementsByTagName('meta').item(property='video');
  • 10
    This seems to work (atleast in chrome) : document.getElementsByTagName('meta')['video'].getAttribute('content'); if the markup is as below: <meta name="video" content="http://video.com/video33353.mp4" /> – samdeV Aug 8 '14 at 21:51
  • 1
    @samdeV, this is the cleanest of all the solutions here. Submit it as your own answer. :) – frandroid Nov 5 '15 at 22:22
  • 1
    @samdeV, also you don't need to .getAttribute('content'), you can just .content: document.getElementsByTagName('meta')['video'].content. I just tested, this works fine in Firefox as well. – frandroid Nov 5 '15 at 22:39
  • I am now informed that it doesn't work in Safari. Damnit. – frandroid Nov 9 '15 at 16:18
4

Way - [ 1 ]

function getMetaContent(property, name){
    return document.head.querySelector("["+property+"="+name+"]").content;
}
console.log(getMetaContent('name', 'csrf-token'));

You may get error: Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'getAttribute' of null


Way - [ 2 ]

function getMetaContent(name){
    return document.getElementsByTagName('meta')[name].getAttribute("content");
}
console.log(getMetaContent('csrf-token'));

You may get error: Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'getAttribute' of null


Way - [ 3 ]

function getMetaContent(name){
    name = document.getElementsByTagName('meta')[name];
    if(name != undefined){
        name = name.getAttribute("content");
        if(name != undefined){
            return name;
        }
    }
    return null;
}
console.log(getMetaContent('csrf-token'));

Instead getting error, you get null, that is good.

4

Simple one, right?

document.head.querySelector("meta[property=video]").content
2

This code works for me

<meta name="text" property="text" content="This is text" />
<meta name="video" property="text" content="http://video.com/video33353.mp4" />

JS

var x = document.getElementsByTagName("META");
    var txt = "";
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
        if (x[i].name=="video")
        {
             alert(x[i].content);
         }

    }    

Example fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/muthupandiant/ogfLwdwt/

2
function getDescription() {
    var info = document.getElementsByTagName('meta');
    return [].filter.call(info, function (val) {
        if(val.name === 'description') return val;
    })[0].content;
}

update version:

function getDesc() {
    var desc = document.head.querySelector('meta[name=description]');
    return desc ? desc.content : undefined;
}
2

My variant of the function:

const getMetaValue = (name) => {
  const element = document.querySelector(`meta[name="${name}"]`)
  return element?.getAttribute('content')
}
1

Here's a function that will return the content of any meta tag and will memoize the result, avoiding unnecessary querying of the DOM.

var getMetaContent = (function(){
        var metas = {};
        var metaGetter = function(metaName){
            var theMetaContent, wasDOMQueried = true;;
            if (metas[metaName]) {
                theMetaContent = metas[metaName];
                wasDOMQueried = false;
            }
            else {
                 Array.prototype.forEach.call(document.getElementsByTagName("meta"), function(el) {
                    if (el.name === metaName) theMetaContent = el.content;
                    metas[metaName] = theMetaContent;
                });
            }
            console.log("Q:wasDOMQueried? A:" + wasDOMQueried);
            return theMetaContent;
        }
        return metaGetter;
    })();

getMetaContent("description"); /* getMetaContent console.logs the content of the description metatag. If invoked a second time it confirms that the DOM  was only queried once */

And here's an extended version that also queries for open graph tags, and uses Array#some:

var getMetaContent = (function(){
        var metas = {};
        var metaGetter = function(metaName){
            wasDOMQueried = true;
            if (metas[metaName]) {
                wasDOMQueried = false;
            }
            else {
                 Array.prototype.some.call(document.getElementsByTagName("meta"), function(el) {
                        if(el.name === metaName){
                           metas[metaName] = el.content;
                           return true;
                        }
                        if(el.getAttribute("property") === metaName){
                           metas[metaName] = el.content;
                           return true;
                        }
                        else{
                          metas[metaName] = "meta tag not found";
                        }  
                    });
            }
            console.info("Q:wasDOMQueried? A:" + wasDOMQueried);
            console.info(metas);
            return metas[metaName];
        }
        return metaGetter;
    })();

getMetaContent("video"); // "http://video.com/video33353.mp4"
0

I personally prefer to just get them in one object hash, then I can access them anywhere. This could easily be set to an injectable variable and then everything could have it and it only grabbed once.

By wrapping the function this can also be done as a one liner.

var meta = (function () {
    var m = document.querySelectorAll("meta"), r = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < m.length; i += 1) {
        r[m[i].getAttribute("name")] = m[i].getAttribute("content")
    }
    return r;
})();
0

FYI according to https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/meta global attributes are valid which means the id attribute can be used with getElementById.

0
<html>
<head>
<meta property="video" content="http://video.com/video33353.mp4" />
<meta name="video" content="http://video.com/video33353.mp4" />
</head>
<body>

<script>
var meta = document.getElementsByTagName("meta");
    size = meta.length;

for(var i=0; i<size; i++) {
    if (meta[i].getAttribute("property") === "video") {
        alert(meta[i].getAttribute("content"));
    }
}
meta = document.getElementsByTagName("meta")["video"].getAttribute("content");
alert(meta);
</script>
</body>
</html>

Demo

0

If you are interessted in a more far-reaching solution to get all meta tags you could use this piece of code

function getAllMetas() {
    var metas = document.getElementsByTagName('meta');
    var summary = [];
    Array.from(metas)
        .forEach((meta) => {
            var tempsum = {};
            var attributes = meta.getAttributeNames();
            attributes.forEach(function(attribute) {
                tempsum[attribute] = meta.getAttribute(attribute);
            });
            summary.push(tempsum);
        });
    return summary;
}

// usage
console.log(getAllMetas());
-3

if the meta tag is:

<meta name="url" content="www.google.com" />

JQuery will be:

const url = $('meta[name="url"]').attr('content'); // url = 'www.google.com'

JavaScript will be: (It will return whole HTML)

const metaHtml = document.getElementsByTagName('meta').url // metaHtml = '<meta name="url" content="www.google.com" />'

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