289

I know if I have a data frame with more than 1 column, I can use

colnames(x) <- c("col1","col2")

to rename the columns. How do I do this if it's just one column? Meaning a vector or data frame with only one column in it.

Example:

trSamp <- data.frame(sample(trainer$index, 10000))
head(trSamp )
#   sample.trainer.index..10000.
# 1                      5907862
# 2                      2181266
# 3                      7368504
# 4                      1949790
# 5                      3475174
# 6                      6062879

ncol(trSamp)
# [1] 1
class(trSamp)
# [1] "data.frame"
class(trSamp[1])
# [1] "data.frame"
class(trSamp[,1])
# [1] "numeric"
colnames(trSamp)[2] <- "newname2"
# Error in names(x) <- value : 
#   'names' attribute [2] must be the same length as the vector [1]
  • 4
    @aix's solution will work for a 1-column data.frame. You're probably being confused by the drop=TRUE default argument to [, which causes a "1-column" object to be converted to a vector... and vectors don't have colnames. An example of what you tried would be very helpful. – Joshua Ulrich Sep 23 '11 at 16:31
  • 2
    it works if you use "colnames(x)[1] <- 'newname2'" – screechOwl Sep 23 '11 at 16:44

17 Answers 17

293
colnames(trSamp)[2] <- "newname2"

attempts to set the second column's name. Your object only has one column, so the command throws an error. This should be sufficient:

colnames(trSamp) <- "newname2"
  • 1
    .@JoshuaUlrich - This doesn't seem to work if the column name is something like "A,B,C,X,Y,Z" where I want to rename it to Y using testData[379] <- "Y". – Chetan Arvind Patil Jan 17 at 16:10
501

This is a generalized way in which you do not have to remember the exact location of the variable:

# df = dataframe
# old.var.name = The name you don't like anymore
# new.var.name = The name you want to get

names(df)[names(df) == 'old.var.name'] <- 'new.var.name'

This code pretty much does the following:

  1. names(df) looks into all the names in the df
  2. [names(df) == old.var.name] extracts the variable name you want to check
  3. <- 'new.var.name' assigns the new variable name.
  • 4
    I'm also quite new with R, loved this solution! I've actually checked what it does, and I think it's worth specify that [names(df) == old.var.name] actually returns a vector with true/false values. So it has the potential to change multiple column names if, for example, regular expressions are used. – mikyatope Dec 11 '13 at 16:21
  • 3
    For regular expression results, use something like names(df) = sub('pattern', 'replacement', names(df)). Otherwise you'd be trying to set multiple columns to the same name. – jnylen Sep 27 '14 at 20:09
  • 33
    Mixed feelings...in a perfect world, where perfect programming languages abound, would it really require this many keystrokes to change the name of a single column? I love R but sometimes I want to strangle it for these types of reasons. – Matt O'Brien Aug 15 '15 at 1:19
  • 2
    Its madness how I keep trying names(df[names(df) == "mpg"]) and keep coming back to this answer for the correct syntax names(df)[names(df) == "mpg"] – PatrickT Oct 2 '17 at 18:59
  • 2
    How there not a wrapper function for this in base? – ifly6 Sep 6 '18 at 17:03
78
colnames(df)[colnames(df) == 'oldName'] <- 'newName'
  • 1
    I like this solution as you can reference the column name by name, as opposed to requiring to know which number column it is. Better for larger number features. – Cybernetic Aug 22 '14 at 17:18
  • 1
    I've got a small extension to the question and this answer. I have a dataframe with a column which has the letters 'snp' in it. I want to rename it to 'Marker'. But I want to use a regular expression to do so. Apparently the code I have is flawed: colnames(GWASDATA_RAWSELECTION)[colnames(GWASDATA_RAWSELECTION)=="^snp$"] <- "Marker", because the column is not renamed. If I do names(GWASDATA_RAWSELECTION)[names(GWASDATA_RAWSELECTION)=="snp"] <- "Marker" it is renamed. What am I missing? – Sander W. van der Laan Nov 29 '16 at 22:13
68

This is an old question, but it is worth noting that you can now use setnames from the data.table package.

library(data.table)

setnames(DF, "oldName", "newName")

# or since the data.frame in question is just one column: 
setnames(DF, "newName")

# And for reference's sake, in general (more than once column)
nms <- c("col1.name", "col2.name", etc...)
setnames(DF, nms)
  • 4
    or setNames from base R. – PatrickT Mar 4 at 11:08
49

This can also be done using Hadley's plyr package, and the rename function.

library(plyr) 
df <- data.frame(foo=rnorm(1000)) 
df <- rename(df,c('foo'='samples'))

You can rename by the name (without knowing the position) and perform multiple renames at once. After doing a merge, for example, you might end up with:

  letterid id.x id.y
1       70    2    1
2      116    6    5
3      116    6    4
4      116    6    3
5      766   14    9
6      766   14   13

Which you can then rename in one step using:

letters <- rename(letters,c("id.x" = "source", "id.y" = "target"))

  letterid source target
1       70      2      1
2      116      6      5
3      116      6      4
4      116      6      3
5      766     14      9
6      766     14     13
  • 6
    rename is now a function in the dplyr package as well. – Sam Firke Apr 29 '15 at 17:42
  • 2
    dplyr (v0.4.3) formats rename differently.... df <- rename(df, samples = foo) – Agriculturist May 20 '16 at 19:19
30

I think the best way of renaming columns is by using the dplyr package like this:

require(dplyr)
df = rename(df, new_col01 = old_col01, new_col02 = old_col02, ...)

It works the same for renaming one or many columns in any dataset.

10

I like the next style for rename dataframe column names one by one.

colnames(df)[which(colnames(df) == 'old_colname')] <- 'new_colname'

where

which(colnames(df) == 'old_colname')

returns by the index of the specific column.

  • 1
    +1 for giving the user a chance to use the actual old name :) – user1685185 Jan 27 '14 at 15:13
  • 1
    What is here the difference compared to @zongshiwujie 's solution? – buhtz Aug 24 '16 at 6:48
  • which() is not necessary. – sindri_baldur Aug 10 '18 at 11:16
9

I find that the most convenient way to rename a single column is using dplyr::rename_at :

library(dplyr)
cars %>% rename_at("speed",~"new") %>% head     
cars %>% rename_at(vars(speed),~"new") %>% head
cars %>% rename_at(1,~"new") %>% head

#   new dist
# 1   4    2
# 2   4   10
# 3   7    4
# 4   7   22
# 5   8   16
# 6   9   10
  • works well in pipe chaines
  • convenient when names are stored in variables
  • works with a name or an column index
  • clear and compact
5

You can use the rename.vars in the gdata package.

library(gdata)
df <- rename.vars(df, from = "oldname", to = "newname")

This is particularly useful where you have more than one variable name to change or you want to append or pre-pend some text to the variable names, then you can do something like:

df <- rename.vars(df, from = c("old1", "old2", "old3", 
         to = c("new1", "new2", "new3"))

For an example of appending text to a subset of variables names see: https://stackoverflow.com/a/28870000/180892

  • This is the easiest, thanks. Had issues with the dplyr package. – DannyB Oct 2 '17 at 20:18
4

Try:

colnames(x)[2] <- 'newname2'
  • 8
    This is what threw the error that OP asked about (in his edit). It won't work, as the dataframe only has one column. – user399470 Sep 23 '11 at 22:05
  • .@NPE - This doesn't seem to work if the column name is something like "A,B,C,X,Y,Z" where I want to rename it to Y using testData[379] <- "Y". – Chetan Arvind Patil Jan 17 at 16:10
4

This is likely already out there, but I was playing with renaming fields while searching out a solution and tried this on a whim. Worked for my purposes.

Table1$FieldNewName <- Table1$FieldOldName
Table1$FieldOldName <- NULL

Edit begins here....

This works as well.

df <- rename(df, c("oldColName" = "newColName"))
  • To whoever marked me down, that is fine, but since I am obviously new to doing this, perhaps you could enlighten as to what was wrong with the answer. – Scottieie Feb 2 '17 at 2:56
  • There's nothing wrong with your answer, besides it not being a oneliner.. that was just a hostile SO user not having the courage to justify his tantrum. – count0 Mar 10 '17 at 19:12
  • Thanks @count0. It actually is meaningful to have some mana points or whatever to comment on a question, something I have been yet to be able to do. Follow up questions in some cases would be nice as I learn a new skillset. Again. TY. – Scottieie Mar 11 '17 at 21:12
  • 1
    we need to give all columns name to use this. – Arpit Sisodia Apr 2 '17 at 8:47
3

You could also try 'upData' from 'Hmisc' package.

library(Hmisc)

trSamp = upData(trSamp, rename=c(sample.trainer.index..10000. = 'newname2'))

  • Very nice! It's is also possible to rename more columns at once: trSamp = upData(trSamp, rename=c(sample.trainer.index..10000. = 'newname2, AnotherColumnName = 'RenameThisColumn')) – FraNut Jul 7 '16 at 13:11
2

If you know that your dataframe has only one column, you can use: names(trSamp) <- "newname2"

-1

I would simply add a new column to the data frame with the name I want and get the data for it from the existing column. like this:

dataf$value=dataf$Article1Order

then I remove the old column! like this:

dataf$Article1Order<-NULL

This code might seem silly! But it works perfectly...

-1

The OP's question has been well and truly answered. However, here's a trick that may be useful in some situations: partial matching of the column name, irrespective of its position in a dataframe:

Partial matching on the name:

d <- data.frame(name1 = NA, Reported.Cases..WHO..2011. = NA, name3 = NA)
##   name1 Reported.Cases..WHO..2011. name3
## 1    NA                         NA    NA
names(d)[grepl("Reported", names(d))] <- "name2"
##   name1 name2 name3
## 1    NA    NA    NA

Another example: partial matching on the presence of "punctuation":

d <- data.frame(name1 = NA, Reported.Cases..WHO..2011. = NA, name3 = NA)
##   name1 Reported.Cases..WHO..2011. name3
## 1    NA                         NA    NA
names(d)[grepl("[[:punct:]]", names(d))] <- "name2"
##   name1 name2 name3
## 1    NA    NA    NA

These were examples I had to deal with today, I thought might be worth sharing.

-1

I would simply change a column name to the dataset with the new name I want with the following code: names(dataset)[index_value] <- "new_col_name"

-1
library(dplyr)
rename(data, de=de.y)
  • Care to add a bit of why this helps OP's problem? – Guillaume Racicot Jul 24 at 13:30

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