332

I have var ar = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] and want some function getSubarray(array, fromIndex, toIndex), that result of call getSubarray(ar, 1, 3) is new array [2, 3, 4].

1

5 Answers 5

516

Take a look at Array.slice(begin, end)

const ar  = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

// slice from 1..3 - add 1 as the end index is not included

const ar2 = ar.slice(1, 3 + 1);

console.log(ar2);

5
  • 58
    It's probably worth explicitly mentioning here that the original ar is unmodified. console.log(ar); // -> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    – daemone
    Dec 18, 2018 at 18:35
  • Also, don't make the mistake of confusing the slice() method with splice(): splice() changes the original array while slice() doesn't. Nov 7, 2021 at 15:52
  • I'm sorry, but what if I try to slice using parameters, that'd raise some sort of "index out of bounds" error? In the example imagine I'd go with ar.slice(4, 4);? I guess I should try out :x..
    – Igor
    Nov 30, 2021 at 23:03
  • 1
    @Igor No, slice does not raise an exception. If the end is greater than the length of the sequence, slice extracts through to the end of the sequence (arr.length). developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – David Piao
    Dec 14, 2021 at 16:54
  • I want to add another note that slice does not raise exceptions for any type of input (string, undefined, object whatever). If start is out of range (negative or greater than the length), it just returns an empty array.
    – David Piao
    Jul 17 at 15:12
20

For a simple use of slice, use my extension to Array Class:

Array.prototype.subarray = function(start, end) {
    if (!end) { end = -1; } 
    return this.slice(start, this.length + 1 - (end * -1));
};

Then:

var bigArr = ["a", "b", "c", "fd", "ze"];

Test1:

bigArr.subarray(1, -1);

< ["b", "c", "fd", "ze"]

Test2:

bigArr.subarray(2, -2);

< ["c", "fd"]

Test3:

bigArr.subarray(2);

< ["c", "fd","ze"]

Might be easier for developers coming from another language (i.e. Groovy).

3
  • 19
  • What K_7 said; most especially, monkey-patching the Builtins (Object, Array, Promise, etc) is very naughty. See the famous example of MooTools forcing a rename of the proposed native Array.prototype.contains to Array.prototype.includes.
    – daemone
    Jan 8, 2019 at 10:26
  • Not to mention, your subarray method delivers unexpected results. bigArr.slice(1,-1) returns ['b','c','fd'], which you would expect (the -1 knocks one element off the end of the new array). But bigArr.subarray(1,-1) returns the same as bigArr.subarray(1), which is to say everything from position 1 to the end of bigArr. You're also forcing users to always give negative numbers as the end parameter. Any end >= -1 gives the same result as when end === undefined. On the other hand, bigArr.slice(1,3) returns ['b','c'], which again is expected.
    – daemone
    Jan 8, 2019 at 10:38
6

const array_one = [11, 22, 33, 44, 55];
const start = 1;
const end = array_one.length - 1;
const array_2 = array_one.slice(start, end);
console.log(array_2);

1
  • it does not compile here the correction : var array_one = [11, 22, 33, 44,55]; var ar2 = array_one.slice(0, array_one.length-1); console.log(ar2)
    – bormat
    Mar 19, 2018 at 17:33
3

I have var ar = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] and want some function getSubarray(array, fromIndex, toIndex), that result of call getSubarray(ar, 1, 3) is new array [2, 3, 4].

Exact Solution

function getSubarray(array, fromIndex, toIndex) {
    return array.slice(fromIndex, toIndex+1);
}

Let's Test the Solution

let ar = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
getSubarray(ar, 1, 3)

// result: [2,3,4]

Array.prototype.slice()

The slice() method returns a shallow copy of a portion of an array into a new array object selected from start to end (end not included) where start and end represent the index of items in that array. The original array will not be modified.

Basically, slice lets you select a subarray from an array.

For example, let's take this array:

const animals = ['ant', 'bison', 'camel', 'duck', 'elephant'];

Doing this:

console.log(animals.slice(2, 4));

Will give us this output:

// result: ["camel", "duck"]

Syntax:

slice() // creates a shallow copy of the array
slice(start) // shows only starting point and returns all values after start index
slice(start, end) // slices from start index to end index

See shallow copy reference

1

The question is actually asking for a New array, so I believe a better solution would be to combine Abdennour TOUMI's answer with a clone function:

function clone(obj) {
  if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;
  const copy = obj.constructor();
  for (const attr in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = obj[attr];
  }
  return copy;
}

// With the `clone()` function, you can now do the following:

Array.prototype.subarray = function(start, end) {
  if (!end) {
    end = this.length;
  } 
  const newArray = clone(this);
  return newArray.slice(start, end);
};

// Without a copy you will lose your original array.

// **Example:**

const array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
console.log(array.subarray(2)); // print the subarray [3, 4, 5, subarray: function]

console.log(array); // print the original array [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, subarray: function]

[http://stackoverflow.com/questions/728360/most-elegant-way-to-clone-a-javascript-object]

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  • 10
    I dont think that slice will change the original array.
    – Mani
    Sep 21, 2015 at 5:06
  • 10
    Array.prototype.slice returns a copy already. Array.prototype.splice modifies the original array. Feb 7, 2016 at 20:51
  • 2
    The slice() method returns a shallow copy of a portion of an array into a new array object. See Mozilla Developer Network. Downvoted. Mar 3, 2017 at 18:34
  • As others have said, slice already returns a shallow copy, making this subarray implementation unnecessary. But it's also worth mentioning you've monkey-patched a builtin object, which is a big no-no. See the comments on Abdennour TOUMI's answer.
    – daemone
    Jan 8, 2019 at 11:00

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