24

Context

So, I'm trying to create a new Python package following this tutorial: https://packaging.python.org/en/latest/tutorials/packaging-projects/

As the tutorial says, in my pyproject.toml I should have this structure:

[project]
name = "example_package_YOUR_USERNAME_HERE"
version = "0.0.1"
authors = [
  { name="Example Author", email="[email protected]" },
]
description = "A small example package"

but when I created this file with poetry init, it created this structure:

[tool.poetry]
name = "example_package_YOUR_USERNAME_HERE"
version = "0.0.1"
authors = [
  { name="Example Author", email="[email protected]" },
]
description = "A small example package"

The main difference between these two is the [project] instead of [tool.poetry] section header. I also see, that poetry can't do anything with the project, when there is no [tool.poetry] section in pyproject.toml


So my questions are:

  1. What are the differences between these two?

  2. Should I have only one or both at the same time in my pyproject.toml? And in case I should keep both, what should it contain?

  3. In case there should be only [tool.poetry], do I need to follow the same rules for the content and sub-sections as for [project]? So for example [project.urls] would be renamed to [tool.poetry.urls]?

  4. What is the best future-proof choice for publishing on PyPI? Or are there no difference?

  5. Is changing the [build-system] from poetry-core to setuptools a good idea? Or I should keep poetry-core?

1
  • Which version of poetry are you using to have arrived at the formatting of the [tool.poetry] section you shared here using poetry init? Based on what I've seen poetry do and what's an ongoing discussion on GitHub regarding not standard-compliant behaviour, the naming of the section would be the least of your problems; both name and authors should look different from what's shown here.
    – Kay
    Nov 9, 2023 at 20:13

2 Answers 2

33

1. What are the differences between these two?

The [project] section is standardized (also known as PEP-621). But Poetry is older than the creation of this standard, so it started by using its own section [tool.poetry]. Poetry is planning to add support for the standardized [project] (see python-poetry/poetry/issues/3332 and python-poetry/roadmap/issues/3), but it takes time.

The differences between the two are quite small, they are basically different notations for the same package metadata. The most notable difference (the one you should keep an eye on) is regarding the notation for declaring the dependencies. This is where the divergence is the most critical.

2. Should I have only one or both at the same time in my pyproject.toml? And in case I should keep both, what should it contain?

You should have only one. You have to choose a build back-end. If your build back-end is poetry-core then you need the [tool.poetry] section. If you choose a build back-end that requires [project] (which is the case of setuptools), then that is what you should have.

3. In case there should be only [tool.poetry], do I need to follow the same rules for the content and sub-sections as for [project]? So for example [project.urls] would be renamed to [tool.poetry.urls]?

This is not exactly one-to-one equivalent, there are some differences. Follow Poetry's documentation if you use Poetry. Or the [project] specification if you use something else (setuptools, etc.).

4. What is the best future-proof choice for publishing on PyPI? Or are there no difference?

This is for you (and your team) to decide. One could argue that choosing a build back-end that follows the [project] standard is more future-proof, but it is only one criteria amongst many. The following tables compare some features one could take into account when making such a choice:

5. Is changing the [build-system] from poetry-core to setuptools a good idea? Or I should keep poetry-core?

Poetry the "development workflow tool" does not allow using any other build back-end than poetry-core. So if you want to keep using Poetry for your project, you have no choice but to keep using poetry-core as build back-end.

2
  • Thank you for your well-written description. This is very helpful! Especially about poetry developer's plans about adding support of [project]. And for tool comparisons too Feb 10, 2023 at 12:42
  • Thanks, this is incredibly helpful. Adding [project.urls] and some links on its own broke my docker build where my Dockerfile did a poetry install because for some reason on my Jupyter Stacks docker image alone it failed to parse. Anyway, [tool.poetry.urls] works for me! :)
    – rjurney
    Oct 6, 2023 at 1:26
1

The [project] section is mandatory in pyproject.toml. If the entry is missing, the build tool (defined in [build-system] section) have to add it dynamically. I guess that's exactly what poetry does.

From the documentation:

The keys defined in this specification MUST be in a table named [project] in pyproject.toml. No tools may add keys to this table which are not defined by this specification. For tools wishing to store their own settings in pyproject.toml, they may use the [tool] table as defined in the build dependency declaration specification. The lack of a [project] table implicitly means the build back-end will dynamically provide all keys.

So you don't need the [project] while you are using poetry. If you change the build system, you must convert your pyproject.toml to be PEP 621 compliant.

4
  • So, if I switch [build-system] to setuptools - I need to use [project], but if I switch to poetry-core - I need to use [tool.poetry]? So how can I use poetry as venv handler, but use setuptools as build backend? Feb 10, 2023 at 9:11
  • Why do you want to have 2 tools? poetry can do the job.
    – Corralien
    Feb 10, 2023 at 9:14
  • Just curious about changing backend, ofc I can leave as poetry-core. I'm just trying to understand all aspects of poetry capabilities. Knowledge is power, as someone said :) Feb 10, 2023 at 9:18
  • 2
    It's a bad idea to mix package managers. Just one tool to handle [build-system] section. Setuptools is also able to use dynamic directives under the section [tool.setuptools.dynamic] like version.
    – Corralien
    Feb 10, 2023 at 9:36

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