102

I have a dataset with 11 columns with over a 1000 rows each. The columns were labeled V1, V2, V11, etc.. I replaced the names with something more useful to me using the "c" command. I didn't realize that row 1 also contained labels for each column and my actual data starts on row 2.

Is there a way to delete row 1 and decrement?

6 Answers 6

152

Keep the labels from your original file like this:

df = read.table('data.txt', header = T)

If you have columns named x and y, you can address them like this:

df$x
df$y

If you'd like to actually delete the first row from a data.frame, you can use negative indices like this:

df = df[-1,]

If you'd like to delete a column from a data.frame, you can assign NULL to it:

df$x = NULL

Here are some simple examples of how to create and manipulate a data.frame in R:

# create a data.frame with 10 rows
> x = rnorm(10)
> y = runif(10)
> df = data.frame( x, y )

# write it to a file
> write.table( df, 'test.txt', row.names = F, quote = F )

# read a data.frame from a file: 
> read.table( df, 'test.txt', header = T )

> df$x
 [1] -0.95343778 -0.63098637 -1.30646529  1.38906143  0.51703237 -0.02246754
 [7]  0.20583548  0.21530721  0.69087460  2.30610998
> df$y
 [1] 0.66658148 0.15355851 0.60098886 0.14284576 0.20408723 0.58271061
 [7] 0.05170994 0.83627336 0.76713317 0.95052671

> df$x = x
> df
            y           x
1  0.66658148 -0.95343778
2  0.15355851 -0.63098637
3  0.60098886 -1.30646529
4  0.14284576  1.38906143
5  0.20408723  0.51703237
6  0.58271061 -0.02246754
7  0.05170994  0.20583548
8  0.83627336  0.21530721
9  0.76713317  0.69087460
10 0.95052671  2.30610998

> df[-1,]
            y           x
2  0.15355851 -0.63098637
3  0.60098886 -1.30646529
4  0.14284576  1.38906143
5  0.20408723  0.51703237
6  0.58271061 -0.02246754
7  0.05170994  0.20583548
8  0.83627336  0.21530721
9  0.76713317  0.69087460
10 0.95052671  2.30610998

> df$x = NULL
> df 
            y
1  0.66658148
2  0.15355851
3  0.60098886
4  0.14284576
5  0.20408723
6  0.58271061
7  0.05170994
8  0.83627336
9  0.76713317
10 0.95052671
2
  • 3
    I am not sure if it's clear to @akz: in header=T the T stands for TRUE, so this parameter tells R to load header. See ?read.table for details.
    – daroczig
    Commented Sep 25, 2011 at 20:38
  • Note that if you have a single column data frame then please look at this answer - stackoverflow.com/a/3232770/4606130 where you will need a drop = FALSE as well when negative indexing
    – micstr
    Commented Jul 13, 2017 at 12:13
31

You can use negative indexing to remove rows, e.g.:

dat <- dat[-1, ]

Here is an example:

> dat <- data.frame(A = 1:3, B = 1:3)
> dat[-1, ]
  A B
2 2 2
3 3 3
> dat2 <- dat[-1, ]
> dat2
  A B
2 2 2
3 3 3

That said, you may have more problems than just removing the labels that ended up on row 1. It is more then likely that R has interpreted the data as text and thence converted to factors. Check what str(foo), where foo is your data object, says about the data types.

It sounds like you just need header = TRUE in your call to read in the data (assuming you read it in via read.table() or one of it's wrappers.)

0
27

While I agree with the most voted answer, here is another way to keep all rows except the first:

dat <- tail(dat, -1)

This can also be accomplished using Hadley Wickham's dplyr package.

dat <- dat %>% slice(-1)
12

No one probably really wants to remove row one. So if you are looking for something meaningful, that is conditional selection

#remove rows that have long length and "0" value for vector E

>> setNew<-set[!(set$length=="long" & set$E==0),]
1
  • This is an answer for a question that was not asked. I think it's more confusing than helping.
    – U. Windl
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 11:41
9

I am not expert, but this may work as well,

dat <- dat[2:nrow(dat), ]
1
  • Actually this does not work when nrow(dat) == 1: Then the original dat is preserved.
    – U. Windl
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 11:46
6

dat <- dat[-1, ] worked but it killed my dataframe, changing it into another type. Had to instead use dat <- data.frame(dat[-1, ]) but this is possibly a special case as this dataframe initially had only one column.

1
  • This is a comment, not an answer! Despite of that I could not reproduce.
    – U. Windl
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 11:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.