131

I can do a delete, insert and update in my program and I try to do an insert by call a created stored procedure from my database.

This a button insert I make work well.

private void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);

        da.InsertCommand = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO tblContacts VALUES (@FirstName, @LastName)", con);
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

        con.Open();
        da.InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();

        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    } 

This is the start of the button to call the procedure named sp_Add_contact to add a contact. The two parameters for sp_Add_contact(@FirstName,@LastName). I searched on google for some good example but I found nothing interesting.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

        ???

        con.Open();
        da. ???.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();

        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    }
  • 7
    Just an extra bit of info - you should not name your application stored procedures with an sp_ prefix, like above with sp_Add_contact. the sp_ prefix is a system stored proc naming convention, that, when SQL sees it, will search through all system stored procedures first before any application or user space stored procs. As a matter of performance, if you care about that in your application, the sp_ prefix will degrade your response times. – Robert Achmann Nov 25 '14 at 16:43
248

It's pretty much the same as running a query. In your original code you are creating a command object, putting it in the cmd variable, and never use it. Here, however, you will use that instead of da.InsertCommand.

Also, use a using for all disposable objects, so that you are sure that they are disposed properly:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

      cmd.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
      cmd.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

      con.Open();
      cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
  }
}
  • 6
    but if this procedure returns data, how can I catch it in C#? – M009 Apr 16 '13 at 15:16
  • 8
    @M009: Then you use ExecuteReader or ExecuteScalar to call it. – Guffa Apr 16 '13 at 18:36
  • 2
    @M009: Yes, that is another way to do the same thing. The data adapter uses ExecuteReader. – Guffa Apr 17 '13 at 21:35
  • 1
    @DylanChen: That depends on the database settings. The default setting is that identifiers are not case sensetive. – Guffa May 10 '16 at 8:37
  • 1
    @DylanChen: It's the collation setting of the database that determines whether identifiers are case sensetive. – Guffa May 12 '16 at 14:22
33

You have to add parameters since it is needed for the SP to execute

using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con))
{
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SP_ADD", con))
    {
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", txtfirstname.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", txtlastname.Text);
        con.Open();
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }            
}
  • 6
    AddWithValue is a bad idea; SQL Server doesn't always use the correct length for nvarchar or varchar, causing an implicit conversion to occur. It's better to specify the parameter's length explicitly, and then add the value separately using parameter.Value = txtfirstname. – George Stocker Nov 18 '14 at 13:31
13

cmd.Parameters.Add(String parameterName, Object value) is deprecated now. Instead use cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value)

Add(String parameterName, Object value) has been deprecated. Use AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value)

There is no difference in terms of functionality. The reason they deprecated the cmd.Parameters.Add(String parameterName, Object value) in favor of AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value) is to give more clarity. Here is the MSDN reference for the same

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

      cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
      cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

      con.Open();
      cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
  }
}
  • 2
    Do you have a link or source to the claim that cmd.Parameters.Add is deprecated? – David May 12 '15 at 6:32
  • 6
    @TonyG: that's not true, the accepted answer uses the preferred overload of Add which is also not deprecated. AddWithValue is also not the best way since it infers the type of the parameter from the paramater value. This often leads to bad execution plans or incorrect conversions. It also doesn't validate the parameter in the first place(f.e. type if Datetime but you pass a String). You can see here that only Add which takes an Object as second argument is deprecated. – Tim Schmelter May 21 '15 at 7:27
  • 2
    AddWithValue has just the same functionality than Add with Object, but it's not the preferred way. Both need to infer the type. – Tim Schmelter May 21 '15 at 7:31
  • 2
    You're absolutely right, @TimSchmelter. My reading of the text was flawed. Thanks for the correction. I'm writing some new code where I'll be using Add(). And I'll change my upvote on this Answer to a downvote, as Rahul Nikate was as mistaken as I was. – TonyG May 21 '15 at 15:09
  • 2
    @TimSchmelter Thank you for your advise. I've edited my answer. – Rahul Nikate May 21 '15 at 15:24
3

As an alternative, I have a library that makes it easy to work with procs: https://www.nuget.org/packages/SprocMapper/

SqlServerAccess sqlAccess = new SqlServerAccess("your connection string");
    sqlAccess.Procedure()
         .AddSqlParameter("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar, txtFirstName.Text)
         .AddSqlParameter("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar, txtLastName.Text)
         .ExecuteNonQuery("StoreProcedureName");
-1
public void myfunction(){
        try
        {
            sqlcon.Open();
            SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_laba", sqlcon);
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            sqlcon.Close();
        }
}
-1

The .NET Data Providers consist of a number of classes used to connect to a data source, execute commands, and return recordsets. The Command Object in ADO.NET provides a number of Execute methods that can be used to perform the SQL queries in a variety of fashions.

A stored procedure is a pre-compiled executable object that contains one or more SQL statements. In many cases stored procedures accept input parameters and return multiple values . Parameter values can be supplied if a stored procedure is written to accept them. A sample stored procedure with accepting input parameter is given below :

  CREATE PROCEDURE SPCOUNTRY
  @COUNTRY VARCHAR(20)
  AS
  SELECT PUB_NAME FROM publishers WHERE COUNTRY = @COUNTRY
  GO

The above stored procedure is accepting a country name (@COUNTRY VARCHAR(20)) as parameter and return all the publishers from the input country. Once the CommandType is set to StoredProcedure, you can use the Parameters collection to define parameters.

  command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
  param = new SqlParameter("@COUNTRY", "Germany");
  param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
  param.DbType = DbType.String;
  command.Parameters.Add(param);

The above code passing country parameter to the stored procedure from C# application.

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string connetionString = null;
            SqlConnection connection ;
            SqlDataAdapter adapter ;
            SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand();
            SqlParameter param ;
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();

            int i = 0;

            connetionString = "Data Source=servername;Initial Catalog=PUBS;User ID=sa;Password=yourpassword";
            connection = new SqlConnection(connetionString);

            connection.Open();
            command.Connection = connection;
            command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            command.CommandText = "SPCOUNTRY";

            param = new SqlParameter("@COUNTRY", "Germany");
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            param.DbType = DbType.String;
            command.Parameters.Add(param);

            adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(command);
            adapter.Fill(ds);

            for (i = 0; i <= ds.Tables[0].Rows.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                MessageBox.Show (ds.Tables[0].Rows[i][0].ToString ());
            }

            connection.Close();
        }
    }
}
  • Your answer does not use using blocks which is a best practice. Also, there should be a try catch block to deal with any exceptions. – Trisped Aug 16 '18 at 17:42
-2

Adding the parameters separately gave me issues, so I did this and it worked great:

 string SqlQ = string.Format("exec sp_Add_contact '{0}', '{1}'", txtFirstName.Text, txtLastName.Text);
 using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
   using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {


    con.Open();
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
 }
}
  • 5
    Enjoy worse performnace and potential SQL injection issues – Benjamin Gruenbaum Nov 14 '15 at 21:26

protected by Jim Fasarakis Hilliard Oct 12 '16 at 22:42

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