2

What is the best way (pattern) around return method1() || method2() not invoking method2() if method1() returns true?

Example

I'm using this class to bound a table:

class Bounds {
    // return true iff bounds changed
    boolean set(int start, int end);
}

and I want this function to resize both the rows and columns and return true iff either was modified:

public boolean resizeToFirstCell(Bounds rows, Bounds columns) {
   return rows.set(0, 1) || columns.set(0, 1);
}
  • 1
    Using local variables to store each result should work. – Vaughn Cato Sep 25 '11 at 15:03
  • @delnan I am aware, but what pattern/rewrite would you suggest for clarity while keeping brevity in mind? – Garrett Hall Sep 25 '11 at 15:04
  • @Vaugn gave you a pattern. With half a dozen programming languages listed you should be lucky to get something that always works, and is clear. – Henk Holterman Sep 25 '11 at 15:39
7

Use a non-short circuiting (sometimes called "Eager") operator, |.

public boolean resizeToFirstCell(Bounds rows, Bounds columns) {
    return rows.set(0, 1) | columns.set(0, 1);
}

You can read more about that in the operator documentation for || (C# specific link, but still holds true for Java and C++).

  • I cannot believe I didnt know this! I am no expert or anything but it seems so basic.. just goes to show its still worth checking out the documentation for things like this! – user359135 Sep 25 '11 at 15:16
  • 1
    +1 for brevity and teaching me something new! – Garrett Hall Sep 25 '11 at 15:20
  • 2
    @gordatron: You are correct, they are for bitwise ops. I believe in C++ this would work by first promoting the bools to ints (false=0, true=1) then doing the bitwise OR on those ints. I presume its the same in C# and Java. It's kind of hacky, but it works, and is used a lot in performance sensitive code where branches due to && and || are expensive. – Peter Alexander Sep 25 '11 at 15:26
  • 2
    Note that this is not exactly the same thing... It assumes that set returns a bool (or 0/1). @Scott Urban's solution is a more reliable pattern in general, plus it is easier to read. (If you insist on this shortcut formulation, !!rows.set() | !!columns.set() is a reliable pattern.) – Nemo Sep 25 '11 at 15:27
  • 2
    @gordatron: Yes, !! is "not not". It will map zero to zero and non-zero to one, which is what you need to use logical | in general. (So it is more than a hint... x || y and x | y compute different things in general. !!x | !!y computes the same thing as x || y but without short-circuiting.) But again, @Scott Urban's answer is just as correct, just as fast, and easier to read. It is really a much better answer in every way. (Note also that this answer does not necessarily preserve evaluation order, either.) – Nemo Sep 25 '11 at 16:26
7
public boolean resizeToFirstCell(Bounds rows, Bounds columns) {
    // Intermediate values are used to explicitly avoid short-circuiting.
    bool rowSet = rows.set(0, 1);
    bool columnSet = columns.set(0, 1);
    return rowSet || columnSet;
}
  • 1
    I would also comment this so no one maintains it into the || version as it could seem more readable – Mark Sep 25 '11 at 15:04
  • @Mark: Good point, I'll add that. – Peter Alexander Sep 25 '11 at 15:05
  • 1
    @zvrba: What about the people that don't understand the programming language :-) They do exist! – Peter Alexander Sep 25 '11 at 15:15
  • 3
    It's less about understanding the programming language and more about not realizing columns.set(0, 1) must execute ;) – user395760 Sep 25 '11 at 15:17
  • 1
    "What about the people that don't understand the programming language" - they don't get commit rights, so they can do what they like :-) – Steve Jessop Sep 25 '11 at 16:00
2

Here's a "pattern" that scales well for more statements:

bool fun() {
    bool changed = false;
    changed |= rows.set(0, 1);
    chnaged |= columns.set(0, 1);
    return changed;
}
  • +1 I like this for the scaling, although my problem primarily is function scaling (many resize functions). If you have an answer for that as well that would be great. – Garrett Hall Sep 25 '11 at 15:34
1

Please use the | eager evaluation instead of shortcircuit operator http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation

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