229

How could I convert from float to string or string to float?

In my case I need to make the assertion between 2 values string (value that I have got from table) and float value that I have calculated.

String valueFromTable = "25";
Float valueCalculated =25.0;

I tried from float to string:

String sSelectivityRate = String.valueOf(valueCalculated);

but the assertion fails

4
  • 11
    you are aware that float values are never precise?
    – xtofl
    Sep 26, 2011 at 8:46
  • 1
    Do you want to compare them as String or as float values? This is not the same thing. float is less precise than double and either can have rounding errors from calculated values. Sep 26, 2011 at 8:47
  • 3
    google not to be confused with googol. ;) Sep 26, 2011 at 8:50
  • I tried you solution and also from goggle but when I make the assertion I got :java.lang.AssertionError: expected:<25> but was:<25.0>
    – lola
    Sep 26, 2011 at 8:51

10 Answers 10

397

Using Java’s Float class.

float f = Float.parseFloat("25");
String s = Float.toString(25.0f);

To compare it's always better to convert the string to float and compare as two floats. This is because for one float number there are multiple string representations, which are different when compared as strings (e.g. "25" != "25.0" != "25.00" etc.)

1
  • Do i need to import something for this to work? I get undefied type 'Float' (I'm in a weird java environment though, openhab scripts)
    – Jonathan
    Feb 5, 2015 at 13:25
37

Float to string - String.valueOf()

float amount=100.00f;
String strAmount=String.valueOf(amount);
// or  Float.toString(float)

String to Float - Float.parseFloat()

String strAmount="100.20";
float amount=Float.parseFloat(strAmount)
// or  Float.valueOf(string)
5

You can try this sample of code:

public class StringToFloat
{

  public static void main (String[] args)
  {

    // String s = "fred";    // do this if you want an exception

    String s = "100.00";

    try
    {
      float f = Float.valueOf(s.trim()).floatValue();
      System.out.println("float f = " + f);
    }
    catch (NumberFormatException nfe)
    {
      System.out.println("NumberFormatException: " + nfe.getMessage());
    }
  }
}

found here

1
  • Thanks - helped me, needed the catch bit ;) Aug 16, 2012 at 6:18
3

I believe the following code will help:

float f1 = 1.23f;
String f1Str = Float.toString(f1);      
float f2 = Float.parseFloat(f1Str);
2

This is a possible answer, this will also give the precise data, just need to change the decimal point in the required form.

public class TestStandAlone {

    /**
     * 

This method is to main

* @param args void */ public static void main(String[] args) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub try { Float f1=152.32f; BigDecimal roundfinalPrice = new BigDecimal(f1.floatValue()).setScale(2,BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP); System.out.println("f1 --> "+f1); String s1=roundfinalPrice.toPlainString(); System.out.println("s1 "+s1); } catch (Exception e) { // TODO Auto-generated catch block e.printStackTrace(); } } }

Output will be

f1 --> 152.32
s1 152.32
2

If you're looking for, say two decimal places.. Float f = (float)12.34; String s = new DecimalFormat ("#.00").format (f);

1

well this method is not a good one, but easy and not suggested. Maybe i should say this is the least effective method and the worse coding practice but, fun to use,

float val=10.0;
String str=val+"";

the empty quotes, add a null string to the variable str, upcasting 'val' to the string type.

0
String str = "1234.56";
float num = 0.0f;

int digits = str.length()- str.indexOf('.') - 1;

float factor = 1f;

for(int i=0;i<digits;i++) factor /= 10;

for(int i=str.length()-1;i>=0;i--){

    if(str.charAt(i) == '.'){
        factor = 1;
        System.out.println("Reset, value="+num);
        continue;
    }

    num += (str.charAt(i) - '0') * factor;
    factor *= 10;
}

System.out.println(num);
0

There are three ways to convert float to String.

  1. "" + f
  2. Float.toString(f)
  3. String.valueOf(f)

There are two ways Convert String to float

  1. Float.valueOf(str)
  2. Float.parseFloat(str);

Example:-

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("convert FloatToString " + convertFloatToString(34.0f));

        System.out.println("convert FloatToStr Using Float Method " + convertFloatToStrUsingFloatMethod(23.0f));

        System.out.println("convert FloatToStr Using String Method " + convertFloatToStrUsingFloatMethod(233.0f));

        float f = Float.valueOf("23.00");
    }

    public static String convertFloatToString(float f) {
        return "" + f;
    }

    public static String convertFloatToStrUsingFloatMethod(float f) {
        return Float.toString(f);
    }

    public static String convertFloatToStrUsingStringMethod(float f) {
        return String.valueOf(f);
    }

}
0

To go the full manual route: This method converts doubles to strings by shifting the number's decimal point around and using floor (to long) and modulus to extract the digits. Also, it uses counting by base division to figure out the place where the decimal point belongs. It can also "delete" higher parts of the number once it reaches the places after the decimal point, to avoid losing precision with ultra-large doubles. See commented code at the end. In my testing, it is never less precise than the Java float representations themselves, when they actually show these imprecise lower decimal places.

/**
 * Convert the given double to a full string representation, i.e. no scientific notation
 * and always twelve digits after the decimal point.
 * @param d The double to be converted
 * @return A full string representation
 */
public static String fullDoubleToString(final double d) {
    // treat 0 separately, it will cause problems on the below algorithm
    if (d == 0) {
        return "0.000000000000";
    }
    // find the number of digits above the decimal point
    double testD = Math.abs(d);
    int digitsBeforePoint = 0;
    while (testD >= 1) {
        // doesn't matter that this loses precision on the lower end
        testD /= 10d;
        ++digitsBeforePoint;
    }

    // create the decimal digits
    StringBuilder repr = new StringBuilder();
    // 10^ exponent to determine divisor and current decimal place
    int digitIndex = digitsBeforePoint;
    double dabs = Math.abs(d);
    while (digitIndex > 0) {
        // Recieves digit at current power of ten (= place in decimal number)
        long digit = (long)Math.floor(dabs / Math.pow(10, digitIndex-1)) % 10;
        repr.append(digit);
        --digitIndex;
    }

    // insert decimal point
    if (digitIndex == 0) {
        repr.append(".");
    }

    // remove any parts above the decimal point, they create accuracy problems
    long digit = 0;
    dabs -= (long)Math.floor(dabs);
    // Because of inaccuracy, move to entirely new system of computing digits after decimal place.
    while (digitIndex > -12) {
        // Shift decimal point one step to the right
        dabs *= 10d;
        final var oldDigit = digit;
        digit = (long)Math.floor(dabs) % 10;
        repr.append(digit);

        // This may avoid float inaccuracy at the very last decimal places.
        // However, in practice, inaccuracy is still as high as even Java itself reports.
        // dabs -= oldDigit * 10l;
        --digitIndex;
    }

    return repr.insert(0, d < 0 ? "-" : "").toString(); 
}

Note that while StringBuilder is used for speed, this method can easily be rewritten to use arrays and therefore also work in other languages.

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