26

I was recently updating a CMS site and a tab-navigation plugin had inserted the following markup:

<li id="News_tab">...

I've always written my CSS selectors in lowercase so when I tried to style this with #news_tab, it wouldn't apply, but #News_tab worked.

After all these years I'm surprised that I haven't run into this before, so I've always been under the impression that CSS was case-insensitive. Has CSS always been case-sensitive and I just haven't noticed thanks to my consistent code style?

  • don't use caps to start out class or id attributes. personally, i don't use them at all, except for camel casing JS classes. – albert Sep 26 '11 at 18:19
  • @albert Yes, I wouldn't use caps either... it was generated by a plugin, not my style. – Andrew Vit Sep 26 '11 at 18:29
  • Make sure you use a DOCTYPE or you could get weird behavior!!! – David Winiecki Mar 12 '15 at 22:55
29

CSS itself is case insensitive, but selectors from HTML (class and id) are case sensitive:

CSS recommendation on case sensitivity

HTML recommendation, id attribute (note the [CS])

8

CSS4 (CSS Selector Level 4) adds support for case-insensitive match (ASCII only).

input[value='search' i]

It's the "i" at the end which would do the trick...

Check my other answer for details which browser supports this.

6

Class and ID attributes are case sensitive.

  • 3
    I like this line: The simplest way to mitigate any potential issues surrounding case sensitivity is to always use lowercase for everything in your markup and CSS. – animuson Sep 26 '11 at 18:16
  • 1
    The link probably no longer goes to the intended destination... – Gert van den Berg Aug 28 '17 at 7:04
2

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/syndata.html

All CSS syntax is case-insensitive within the ASCII range (i.e., [a-z] and [A-Z] are equivalent), except for parts that are not under the control of CSS

From the docs website.


Follow-up for selectors:

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html

The case-sensitivity of document language element names in selectors depends on the document language. For example, in HTML, element names are case-insensitive, but in XML they are case-sensitive.

  • As was mentioned, CSS isn't case sensitive but HTML does impose restrictions. – Brad Christie Sep 26 '11 at 18:06

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