What are the maximum length of a table name and column name in Oracle?

12 Answers 12

up vote 242 down vote accepted

In Oracle 12.2 and above the maximum object name length is 128 bytes.

In Oracle 12.1 and below the maximum object name length is 30 bytes.

  • 22
    Don't just give the fish, give him a rod and reel – Mark Brady Apr 16 '09 at 16:11
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    I would assume he's trying to say "a user can look up the type, varchar2(30) with a describe call, so giving them just the answer is a bad idea" - personally, I like the simple, concise answer myself. I think his answer is more complete, but I think it's hardly worth a downvote! – corsiKa Nov 15 '13 at 23:58
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    I actually needed this answer because I don't work with Oracle -- my bosses wanted our SQL database to be provider agnostic as much as possible. – robertkroll Apr 16 '14 at 16:29
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  • 2
    in 12c, it's 128 – botkop May 18 '17 at 4:11

Teach a man to fish

Notice the data-type and size

>describe all_tab_columns

VIEW all_tab_columns

Name                                      Null?    Type                        
 ----------------------------------------- -------- ----------------------------
 OWNER                                     NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)                
 TABLE_NAME                                NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)                
 COLUMN_NAME                               NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)                
 DATA_TYPE                                          VARCHAR2(106)               
 DATA_TYPE_MOD                                      VARCHAR2(3)                 
 DATA_TYPE_OWNER                                    VARCHAR2(30)                
 DATA_LENGTH                               NOT NULL NUMBER                      
 DATA_PRECISION                                     NUMBER                      
 DATA_SCALE                                         NUMBER                      
 NULLABLE                                           VARCHAR2(1)                 
 COLUMN_ID                                          NUMBER                      
 DEFAULT_LENGTH                                     NUMBER                      
 DATA_DEFAULT                                       LONG                        
 NUM_DISTINCT                                       NUMBER                      
 LOW_VALUE                                          RAW(32)                     
 HIGH_VALUE                                         RAW(32)                     
 DENSITY                                            NUMBER                      
 NUM_NULLS                                          NUMBER                      
 NUM_BUCKETS                                        NUMBER                      
 LAST_ANALYZED                                      DATE                        
 SAMPLE_SIZE                                        NUMBER                      
 CHARACTER_SET_NAME                                 VARCHAR2(44)                
 CHAR_COL_DECL_LENGTH                               NUMBER                      
 GLOBAL_STATS                                       VARCHAR2(3)                 
 USER_STATS                                         VARCHAR2(3)                 
 AVG_COL_LEN                                        NUMBER                      
 CHAR_LENGTH                                        NUMBER                      
 CHAR_USED                                          VARCHAR2(1)                 
 V80_FMT_IMAGE                                      VARCHAR2(3)                 
 DATA_UPGRADED                                      VARCHAR2(3)                 
 HISTOGRAM                                          VARCHAR2(15)                
  • 3
    With standard SQL you can also determine the lengths by querying the table: select * from all_tab_columns where table_name = 'ALL_TAB_COLUMNS'; – JustinKSU Mar 11 '16 at 23:18
  • It may be better to describe the base table all_objects, since that shows the name limitation applies to pretty much everything which has an all_* view based off of it. – mormegil May 22 '17 at 1:53
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    Take this answer with a grain of salt. On version 12.1.0.2.0 describe user_mview_logs returns LOG_TABLE VARCHAR2(128) but if you try anything approaching 30 characters or more for a materialized view log name, you'll get some quite puzzling results. – Saul Sep 21 '17 at 16:29

DESCRIBE all_tab_columns

will show a TABLE_NAME VARCHAR2(30)

Note VARCHAR2(30) means a 30 byte limitation, not a 30 character limitation, and therefore may be different if your database is configured/setup to use a multibyte character set.

Mike

  • Can this table be modified(expanded)? – Leon Jun 14 at 3:31

Right, but as long as you use ASCII characters even a multibyte character set would still give a limitation of exactly 30 characters... so unless you want to put hearts and smiling cats in you're DB names your fine...

  • 6
    I can DO that? Cool! shoots self – Ed Daniel Oct 23 '10 at 10:46
  • Just to make that clear: there are multi-byte character sets which DO require more than one byte per ASCII character, but they cannot be used as database character set as there is a strict "ASCII superset" requirement for them. (actually its ASCII or EBCDIC depending on the platform). – eckes Aug 3 '15 at 17:07

30 char (bytes, really, as has been stated).

But do not trust me; try this for yourself:

SQL> create table a23456789012345678901234567890 (my_id number);

Table created.



SQL> create table a234567890123456789012345678901(my_id number);


ERROR at line 1:

ORA-00972: identifier is too long

Updated: as stated above, in Oracle 12.2 and later, the maximum object name length is now 128 bytes.

  • 1
    Would you please remove the extra/out-of-order "5" after "a23", and before "4567..." (and add a "0" to the end of the first one, and "1" to the end of the second) in your table names? With the table names as they are, by just looking at the end, it looks as if the limit is 29 characters, and Oracle errors out for 30 characters (which would be rather misleading)!? Or at least that's what it looked like to me... Since my edit to that effect was rejected, let me see if I can convince the author!? :) – OzgurH Oct 12 at 13:48
  • Nice catch! Done, thank you. – Wild Pottok Oct 14 at 19:24

The schema object naming rules may also be of some use:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/sql_elements008.htm#sthref723

On Oracle 12.2, you can use built-in constant, ORA_MAX_NAME_LEN, set to 128 bytes (as per 12.2) Prior to Oracle 12.1 max size was 30 bytes.

In the 10g database I'm dealing with, I know table names are maxed at 30 characters. Couldn't tell you what the column name length is (but I know it's > 30).

  • 1
    Column names are limited to 30 characters as well, not > 30 – Justin Cave Apr 16 '09 at 15:32
  • Ah, I see that (in Mark Brady's answer). I could've sworn I saw one longer, but obviously I was wrong. – Harper Shelby Apr 16 '09 at 18:06

Oracle database object names maximum length is 30 bytes.

Object Name Rules: http://docs.oracle.com/database/121/SQLRF/sql_elements008.htm

The maximum name size is 30 characters because of the data dictionary which allows the storage only for 30 bytes

I'm working on Oracle 12c 12.1. However, doesn't seem like it allows more than 30 characters for column/table names.

Read through an oracle page which mentions 30 bytes. https://docs.oracle.com/database/121/SQLRF/sql_elements008.htm#SQLRF00223

In 12c although the all_tab_columns do say VARCHAR2(128) for Table_Name, it does not allow more than 30 bytes name.

Found another article about 12c R2, which seems to be allowing this up to 128 characters. https://community.oracle.com/ideas/3338

The maximum length of the table and column name is 128 bytes or 128 characters. This limit is for using sybase database users. I verified this answer thoroughly, so that I have posted this answer confidently.

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