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I have a class (SomeClass) which contains a property Name of string type. And I need to store an array of that class and find its items by their names. For this purpose there are two types of collections: KeyedCollection and Dictionary. My question is: What difference between them and in such case It is better to use KeyedCollection and Dictionary? Thanks for any help in explanation.

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    One (somewhat obscure?) advantage of KeyedCollection, at least if you have control of the serialization process, is that you only have to serialize the List<> part and send it "on the wire". It's not necessary to serialize or send the Dictionary<> part because that can be rebuilt at the receiving end as part of the deserializing of the List<> part. – RenniePet May 12 '15 at 13:37
  • You could subclass dictionary to add a method like KeyedCollection's GetKeyForItem, and a second method that performs Add via your added GetKeyForItem. This would turn dictionary into a "SelfKeyedDictionary" that doesn't need the extra storage used by KeyedCollection (to maintain collection order). If you don't need to maintain order, the result would sometimes be superior performance (e.g. of "Remove") and definitely less memory usage. – ToolmakerSteve Nov 23 '18 at 12:33
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None of the previous comments address the most important difference between the two: KeyedCollection keeps your items in the order in which they are added (the first item added is at index 0 and the last added is at the last index). Dictionary does not (or at least it is never guaranteed to do so).

This extra benefit of KeyedCollection does have a small performance cost. Under the covers, you pay the cost of maintaining both a Dictionary and a List.

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    In particular it looks like the Remove() method is rather inefficient - it searches the List sequentially to find the entry to be removed and then shifts the remaining entries one position to the left. (That's in addition to removing the entry from the Dictionary.) – RenniePet May 12 '15 at 20:19
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    "KeyedCollection does have a small performance cost", but presumably this depends on how you use it. It might also perform slightly better than a dictionary for example when used excessively with foreach loops right? – Ben Sep 21 '15 at 13:04
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    @Ben, agreed. That would be a case where KeyedCollection would perform faster. – Neil Sep 23 '15 at 21:20
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Here is good explanation about differences between Dictionary and KeyedCollection: http://geekswithblogs.net/NewThingsILearned/archive/2010/01/07/using-keyedcollectionlttkey-titemgt.aspx

Main points are:

  • KeyedCollection is abstract, so you can't use it directly.
  • KeyedCollection is useful for cases, when key is in entity itself, then you can encapsulate key retrieval within collection implementation.
  • There are generic implementations for KeyedCollection (not in the framework though), which allow you to paste key retrieval delegate in collection constructor, so you don't have to repeat it each time you add item.
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  • The link you provided is indeed a very nice article and a good implementation of a non-abstract KeyedCollection that is also observable. However, XML serialization becomes problematic: the implementation of the ObservableKeyedCollection stores the selection mechanism internally. In order to provide for proper deserialization, this internal storage must become a property. Now a bad-meaning individual could use this to inject code into your application that’d be executed at deserialization time. – Informagic Mar 14 '19 at 7:50
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A KeyedCollection allows mutable keys and ways to manage change in key. Dictionary does not allow changes to key. Secondly, if you have a collection which needs lookup, the logic to extract key from entity remains in one place - whereas maintaining dictionary will need to put key extraction logic at each place where items are added/removed from dictionary.

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    Re "the logic to extract key from entity remains in one place - whereas maintaining dictionary ...". You could subclass dictionary to add a method like KeyedCollection's GetKeyForItem, and a second method that performs Add via your added GetKeyForItem. This would turn dictionary into a "SelfKeyedDictionary" that doesn't need the extra storage used by KeyedCollection (to maintain collection order). If you don't need to maintain order, the result would be superior performance (e.g. of "Remove") and memory. – ToolmakerSteve Nov 23 '18 at 12:31
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By default a KeyedCollection creates a Dictionary under the covers.
If the Key also has meaning as part of the Value and also defines uniqueness then that is the purpose of a KeyedCollection.

If you want to modify the dictionary backing then use this ctor:

protected KeyedCollection(
IEqualityComparer<TKey> comparer,
int dictionaryCreationThreshold)
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A KeyedCollection should be used when the key is on the item itself.

By default, KeyedCollection is a Collection<TItem> wrapper around a dictionary. When you use small collections and/or you prefer retrieving items directly, the KeyedCollection provides a constructor that takes a dictionaryCreationThreshold parameter, that indicates at what collection count to switch to Dictionary.
Another aspect in KeyedCollection is that you can choose to switch the key property (as long as their types match). This can be good for double keyed items etc. Performancewise, I don't think wrapping a dictionary has much overhead except if you generate a bunch of KeyedCollection instances, or if you use really large collections (there are some internal null checks to determine if there is a dictionary).
One thing I'd hope to see in KeyedCollection is unabstracting it, but you can make a generic concrete type just as easy.

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  • Re "One thing I'd hope to see in KeyedCollection is unabstracting it" - how would that work? What would you do instead of overriding GetKeyForItem to specify where the key is in the item? Hmm. Maybe a technique where ctor takes an additional argument, an Expression to use for GetKeyForItem? – ToolmakerSteve Nov 23 '18 at 12:24
  • Yes, that's exactly what I had in mind. They probably created KeyedCollection before lambdas were brought to C#. – Shimmy Weitzhandler Nov 24 '18 at 1:01
  • The problem I see with “unabstracting” is when this is combined with XML serialization: in essence, it’d mean that the lambda expression (that’d be stored as property of the “unabstracted” collection) would be serialized, too. This could be used by an intruder to inject code into your application that’d be executed at deserialization time. – Informagic Mar 14 '19 at 7:47
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You can't use KeyedCollection because it's abstract: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132438.aspx. This means you can't create an object of it.

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    It was designed specifically for inheritance, so the comparison the OP is asking about is between using a dictionary and something you inherit from KeyedCollection. – mattmc3 Mar 22 '12 at 21:10

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