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Section 9.6.4.1 of the Java Language Specification version 19 lists all declaration contexts in the Java language. One of those declaration contexts is "Type parameter declarations of generic classes, interfaces, methods, and constructors".

The Java Language Specification version 19 says "If an annotation of type java.lang.annotation.Target is not present on the declaration of an annotation interface A, then A is applicable in all declaration contexts and in no type contexts"

The javadocs for @Target in Java 19 say that if I have an annotation class not annotated with @Target, my annotation may be used "as a modifier for any declaration" (full stop).

In the Java Language Specification version 13, but not in 14 and later, the text reads, instead: "If an annotation of type java.lang.annotation.Target is not present on the declaration of an annotation type T, then T is applicable in all declaration contexts except type parameter declarations, and in no type contexts".

The javadocs for @Target in Java 13 (but not in 14 and later) read (similarly): "If an annotation of type java.lang.annotation.Target is not present on the declaration of an annotation type T, then T is applicable in all declaration contexts except type parameter declarations, and in no type contexts".

The javadocs for @Target in Java 17 finally change (belatedly?) to match the specification (as changed in 14), reading (as they do today in Java 19): "If an [sic] @Target meta-annotation is not present on an annotation interface T, then an annotation of type T may be written as a modifier for any declaration".

So given this in Java 19:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
public @interface A {}

public class B<@A C> {}

…I would think it would be legal:

But javac says that @A is not applicable in this type context.

Is this a bug? Or have I misread the Java Language Specification, version 19?

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    Wait, you're attaching an annotation to a generic type? Why would one want to do that, let alone if it's legal??
    – Makoto
    Commented Mar 7, 2023 at 22:56
  • I am a curious fellow. Commented Mar 7, 2023 at 23:02
  • I think you should be asking on the relevant OpenJDK mailing list.
    – Stephen C
    Commented Mar 7, 2023 at 23:42
  • Sure. I like to do my homework first. Anyway see mail.openjdk.org/pipermail/compiler-dev/2023-March/022408.html and following. Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 0:10
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    @Makoto You can get the type variables at run-time (e.g., from a class). And TypeVariable is an AnnotatedType. So, one might want to define behavior at run-time based on an annotation on the type parameter. Not sure if they're directly processed (via an annotation processor) at compile-time though.
    – Slaw
    Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 0:39

1 Answer 1

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The change to make @Target-less annotations "applicable in all declaration contexts" happened in JDK-8261610.

I agree with your reading of JLS 19 §9.6.4.1, which says that the 'declaration contexts' include "type parameter declarations of generic classes, interfaces, methods, and constructors", and that

If an annotation of type java.lang.annotation.Target is not present on the declaration of an annotation interface A, then A is applicable in all declaration contexts and in no type contexts.

I think this is a bug: https://bugs.openjdk.org/browse/JDK-8303784

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  • Perfect; +1 for the JDK bug references. Commented Mar 7, 2023 at 23:54
  • @LairdNelson - Note who created the bug and when it was created :-)
    – Stephen C
    Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 0:06
  • Ha; sure; I meant in particular JDK-8261610 Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 0:09
  • Thanks for the PR, too: github.com/openjdk/jdk/pull/12914 Commented Mar 8, 2023 at 0:16

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