422

I have "Hello World" kept in a String variable named hi.

I need to print it, but reversed.

How can I do this? I understand there is some kind of a function already built-in into Java that does that.

Related: Reverse each individual word of “Hello World” string with Java

  • 5
    @JRL should really be String ih = "dlroW olleH"; System.out.println(ih); – Matthew Farwell Sep 27 '11 at 12:49
  • 3
    I wish I could retract my close vote (as a duplicate). I re-read the other question and realized it's subtly different than this. However, this question is still duplicated many times over across the site. Probably ought to just find a different question to mark this a dupe of. – Rob Hruska Sep 27 '11 at 13:31
  • you can use reverse() function of StringBuilder class, toCharArray() method, swapping characters and many more. refer this resource for more examples, flowerbrackets.com/2-best-ways-to-reverse-a-string-in-java – Shiva Jul 3 '18 at 13:51
  • StringBuilder.reverse() is more readable and elegent solution. – lokesh Aug 17 '18 at 10:29

37 Answers 37

909

You can use this:

new StringBuilder(hi).reverse().toString()

Or, for versions earlier than JDK 1.5, use java.util.StringBuffer instead of StringBuilder — they have the same API. Thanks commentators for pointing out that StringBuilder is preferred nowadays when there is no concurrency concern.

  • 12
    "Thanks commentators for pointing out that StringBuilder is preferred nowadays"? There is a clear statement that StringBuffer if thread-safety is a concern. otherwise, StringBuilder can be used. StringBuilder is not a replacement for StringBuffer. – ha9u63ar Jan 8 '15 at 13:51
  • 12
    @ha9u63ar For this scenario with a local throwaway StringBuilder concurrency is not a concern (and I think that's what he meant). – xehpuk Jan 16 '15 at 1:54
  • 2
    Here's the link to know the exact difference between the two: javatpoint.com/… in short: StringBuilder is more efficient than StringBuffer. It's not thread safe i.e. multiple threads can simultaneously call methods of StringBuilder. – Vishnu Narang Feb 14 '17 at 3:17
  • This won't work for Unicode characters outside of BMP, as long as for combining characters. – nau Aug 17 '18 at 11:36
  • 2
    @Daniel Brockman, Thank you for your nice and concise answer. Here OP said, I have "Hello World" kept in a String variable named hi . That means String hi = "Hello World"; . So I think in your answer there should not be any double quotes around hi. I mean it should be like this new StringBuilder(hi).reverse().toString() – Md. Abu Nafee Ibna Zahid Aug 30 '18 at 12:59
104

For Online Judges problems that does not allow StringBuilder or StringBuffer, you can do it in place using char[] as following:

public static String reverse(String input){
    char[] in = input.toCharArray();
    int begin=0;
    int end=in.length-1;
    char temp;
    while(end>begin){
        temp = in[begin];
        in[begin]=in[end];
        in[end] = temp;
        end--;
        begin++;
    }
    return new String(in);
}
  • Just a note though. This will fail horribly for "characters" that occupy two bytes. – Minas Mina Jul 9 '18 at 6:04
  • Actually, it typically works fine for most characters that occupy 2 bytes. What it actually fails for is Unicode codepoints that occupy 2 x 16 bit codeunits (in UTF-16). – Stephen C Oct 8 '18 at 5:33
  • This is good solution, but can we do for the same if we have 10k characters in string with minimum complexity. – Jatinder Kumar Mar 2 at 10:48
61
public static String reverseIt(String source) {
    int i, len = source.length();
    StringBuilder dest = new StringBuilder(len);

    for (i = (len - 1); i >= 0; i--){
        dest.append(source.charAt(i));
    }

    return dest.toString();
}

http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Language-Basics/ReverseStringTest.htm

  • 4
    Good solution (1+). One enhancement - StringBuilder (since java5) will be faster than StringBuffer. Regards. – Michał Šrajer Sep 27 '11 at 12:49
  • 28
    This won't work in the general case as it doesn't take into account that some "characters" in unicode are represented by a surrogate pair i.e. two Java chars, and this solution results in the pair being in the wrong order. The reverse method of StringBuilder should be fine according to the JavaDoc: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… – Ian Fairman Sep 16 '14 at 14:26
58
String string="whatever";
String reverse = new StringBuffer(string).reverse().toString();
System.out.println(reverse);
  • 7
    What is the complexity of it? O(N) or more ? N is equal to length of the string. – Mukit09 Feb 16 '15 at 4:58
  • O(n) since it has to iterate through the chars of the string at least once. – Anna Vopureta Apr 29 '17 at 9:39
26

I am doing this by using the following two ways:

Reverse string by CHARACTERS:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Using traditional approach
    String result="";
    for(int i=string.length()-1; i>=0; i--) {
        result = result + string.charAt(i);
    }
    System.out.println(result);

    // Using StringBuffer class
    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer(string);
    System.out.println(buffer.reverse());    
}

Reverse string by WORDS:

public static void reverseStringByWords(String string) {
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    String[] words = string.split(" ");

    for (int j = words.length-1; j >= 0; j--) {
        stringBuilder.append(words[j]).append(' ');
    }
    System.out.println("Reverse words: " + stringBuilder);
}
19

Take a look at the Java 6 API under StringBuffer

String s = "sample";
String result = new StringBuffer(s).reverse().toString();
  • is this better than StringBuilder? – CamHart Apr 11 '17 at 1:01
  • @CamHart No, it's slower, but probably only a tiny little bit. – jcsahnwaldt Feb 8 '18 at 18:01
  • A little benchmark with almost 100 million method calls showed a significant difference between StringBuffer and StringBuilder: stackoverflow.com/questions/355089/… But in this case, there are only two calls (reverse() and toString()), so the difference probably won't even be measurable. – jcsahnwaldt Feb 8 '18 at 23:53
17

Here is an example using recursion:

public void reverseString() {
    String alphabet = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    String reverseAlphabet = reverse(alphabet, alphabet.length()-1);
}

String reverse(String stringToReverse, int index){
    if(index == 0){
        return stringToReverse.charAt(0) + "";
    }

    char letter = stringToReverse.charAt(index);
    return letter + reverse(stringToReverse, index-1);
}
  • 2
    There are already far better answers, especially @DanielBrockman's. If an algorithm already exists in a standard library, there is no need to handcraft it and reinvent the wheel. – Willi Mentzel Nov 3 '14 at 15:44
  • 14
    A "far better answer" concept is subjective. This may be exactly what someone is looking for. – C0D3LIC1OU5 Nov 3 '14 at 20:09
  • 2
    The OP already stated that "there is some kind of a function already built-in into Java that does that" so his goal was to know exactly which "function" this is. Just posting an answer that has little to do with the actual question asked is non-sense. If someone was to ask for a custom implementation your answer would be justified, in this case it is not. – Willi Mentzel Nov 12 '14 at 11:52
  • Downvote. Most other solutions are O(n) and can handle strings of pretty much any length, this one is O(n^2) and tends to crash with a StackOverflowError for strings longer than about 5000 chars (on JDK 8 VM, default config). – jcsahnwaldt Feb 8 '18 at 2:35
  • 1. The other solutions don't use recursion and can handle long strings just fine. Why would you use recursion instead of iteration for a task like this? It makes no sense. (Unless you're coming from a functional programming background, which often leads to problems when you're writing code in a imperative/OO language.) 2. String concatenation (that innocent little '+') is O(n). You must be new to Java, otherwise you would know that. – jcsahnwaldt Feb 8 '18 at 17:51
12

Here is a low level solution:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class class1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        String inpStr = in.nextLine();
        System.out.println("Original String :" + inpStr);
        char temp;
        char[] arr = inpStr.toCharArray();
        int len = arr.length;
        for(int i=0; i<(inpStr.length())/2; i++,len--){
            temp = arr[i];
            arr[i] = arr[len-1];
            arr[len-1] = temp;
        }

        System.out.println("Reverse String :" + String.valueOf(arr));
    }
}
11

Since the below method (using XOR) to reverse a string is not listed, I am attaching this method to reverse a string.

The Algorithm is based on :

1.(A XOR B) XOR B = A

2.(A XOR B) XOR A = B

Code snippet:

public class ReverseUsingXOR {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str = "prateek";
        reverseUsingXOR(str.toCharArray());
    }   

    /*Example:
     * str= prateek;
     * str[low]=p;
     * str[high]=k;
     * str[low]=p^k;
     * str[high]=(p^k)^k =p;
     * str[low]=(p^k)^p=k;
     * 
     * */
    public static void reverseUsingXOR(char[] str) {
        int low = 0;
        int high = str.length - 1;

        while (low < high) {
            str[low] = (char) (str[low] ^ str[high]);
            str[high] = (char) (str[low] ^ str[high]);   
            str[low] = (char) (str[low] ^ str[high]);
            low++;
            high--;
        }

        //display reversed string
        for (int i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
            System.out.print(str[i]);
        }
    }

}

Output:

keetarp

10

I tried, just for fun, by using a Stack. Here my code:

public String reverseString(String s) {
    Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        stack.push(s.charAt(i));
    }
    while (!stack.empty()) {
        sb.append(stack.pop());
    }
    return sb.toString();

}
7

As others have pointed out the preferred way is to use:

new StringBuilder(hi).reverse().toString()

but if you want to implement this by youself, i'am afraid that the rest of responses have flaws.

The reason is that String represent a list of Unicode points, encoded in a char[] array according to the variable-length encoding: UTF-16.

This means some code points use a single element of the array (one code unit) but others use two of them, so there might be pairs of characters that must be treated as a single unit (consecutive "high" and "low" surrogates)

public static String reverseString(String s) {
    char[] chars = new char[s.length()];
    boolean twoCharCodepoint = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        chars[s.length() - 1 - i] = s.charAt(i);
        if (twoCharCodepoint) {
            swap(chars, s.length() - 1 - i, s.length() - i);
        }
        twoCharCodepoint = !Character.isBmpCodePoint(s.codePointAt(i));
    }
    return new String(chars);
}

private static void swap(char[] array, int i, int j) {
    char temp = array[i];
    array[i] = array[j];
    array[j] = temp;
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("C:/temp/reverse-string.txt");
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("Linear B Syllable B008 A: ");
    sb.appendCodePoint(65536); //http://unicode-table.com/es/#10000
    sb.append(".");
    fos.write(sb.toString().getBytes("UTF-16"));
    fos.write("\n".getBytes("UTF-16"));
    fos.write(reverseString(sb.toString()).getBytes("UTF-16"));
}
  • Good solution, only part missing is now handling of combining diacritics :-D – René Feb 27 '18 at 13:24
4

It is very simple in minimum code of lines

public class ReverseString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String s1 = "neelendra";
        for(int i=s1.length()-1;i>=0;i--)
            {
                System.out.print(s1.charAt(i));
            }
    }
}
3
System.out.print("Please enter your name: ");
String name = keyboard.nextLine();

String reverse = new StringBuffer(name).reverse().toString();
String rev = reverse.toLowerCase();
System.out.println(rev);

I used this method to turn names backwards and into lower case.

3

This did the trick for me

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String text = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    for (int i = (text.length() - 1); i >= 0; i--) {
        System.out.print(text.charAt(i));
    }
}
3

1. Using Character Array:

public String reverseString(String inputString) {
    char[] inputStringArray = inputString.toCharArray();
    String reverseString = "";
    for (int i = inputStringArray.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        reverseString += inputStringArray[i];
    }
    return reverseString;
}

2. Using StringBuilder:

public String reverseString(String inputString) {
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder(inputString);
    stringBuilder = stringBuilder.reverse();
    return stringBuilder.toString();
}

OR

return new StringBuilder(inputString).reverse().toString();
2
    public String reverse(String s) {

        String reversedString = "";
        for(int i=s.length(); i>0; i--) {
            reversedString += s.charAt(i-1);
        }   

        return reversedString;
    }
  • Again, surrogate pairs will become corrupted with this way. – HyperNeutrino Jun 3 '15 at 22:02
  • @JamesSmith could you expand on this please? – Dom Shahbazi Jun 9 '15 at 18:12
  • Some unicode characters consist of two characters; if these two are switched around, the string is corrupted. Also, one commonly overlooked error is regex. – HyperNeutrino Jun 9 '15 at 18:32
2

One natural way to reverse a String is to use a StringTokenizer and a stack. Stack is a class that implements an easy-to-use last-in, first-out (LIFO) stack of objects.

String s = "Hello My name is Sufiyan";

Put it in the stack frontwards

Stack<String> myStack = new Stack<>();
StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(s);
while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
     myStack.push(st.nextToken());
}

Print the stack backwards

System.out.print('"' + s + '"' + " backwards by word is:\n\t\"");
while (!myStack.empty()) {
  System.out.print(myStack.pop());
  System.out.print(' ');
}

System.out.println('"');
2
public class Test {

public static void main(String args[]) {
   StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer("Game Plan");
   buffer.reverse();
   System.out.println(buffer);
 }  
}
  • This doesn't answer the question. – Ryan Feb 14 '15 at 16:03
2

All above solution is too good but here I am making reverse string using recursive programming.

This is helpful for who is looking recursive way of doing reverse string.

public class ReversString {

public static void main(String args[]) {
    char s[] = "Dhiral Pandya".toCharArray();
    String r = new String(reverse(0, s));
    System.out.println(r);
}

public static char[] reverse(int i, char source[]) {

    if (source.length / 2 == i) {
        return source;
    }

    char t = source[i];
    source[i] = source[source.length - 1 - i];
    source[source.length - 1 - i] = t;

    i++;
    return reverse(i, source);

}

}
2

Procedure :

We can use split() to split the string .Then use reverse loop and add the characters.


Code snippet:

class test
{
  public static void main(String args[]) 
  {
      String str = "world";
      String[] split= str.split("");

      String revers = "";
      for (int i = split.length-1; i>=0; i--)
      {
        revers += split[i];
      }
      System.out.printf("%s", revers);
   }  
}

 //output : dlrow

2

Just For Fun..:)

Algorithm (str,len)
char reversedStr[] =new reversedStr[len]

Traverse i from 0 to len/2 and then

reversedStr[i]=str[len-1-i]  
reversedStr[len-1=i]=str[i]
return reversedStr;

Time Complexity:O(n)

Space Complexity :O(n)

public class Reverse {
    static char reversedStr[];

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(reversestr("jatin"));
    }


    private static String reversestr(String str) {
        int strlen = str.length();
        reversedStr = new char[strlen];

        for (int i = 0; i <= strlen / 2; i++) {
            reversedStr[i] = str.charAt(strlen - 1 - i);
            reversedStr[strlen - 1 - i] = str.charAt(i);

        }
        return new String(reversedStr);
    }

}
1

public String reverseWords(String s) {

    String reversedWords = "";

    if(s.length()<=0) {
        return reversedWords;
    }else if(s.length() == 1){
        if(s == " "){
            return "";
        }
        return s;
    }

    char arr[] = s.toCharArray();
    int j = arr.length-1;
    while(j >= 0 ){
        if( arr[j] == ' '){
            reversedWords+=arr[j];
        }else{
            String temp="";
            while(j>=0 && arr[j] != ' '){
                temp+=arr[j];
                j--;
            }
            j++;
            temp = reverseWord(temp);
            reversedWords+=temp;
        }
        j--;

    }

    String[] chk = reversedWords.split(" ");

    if(chk == null || chk.length == 0){
        return "";
    }

    return reversedWords;



}

public String reverseWord(String s){

    char[] arr = s.toCharArray();

    for(int i=0,j=arr.length-1;i<=j;i++,j--){
        char tmp = arr[i];
        arr[i] = arr[j];
        arr[j] = tmp;
    }
    return String.valueOf(arr);

}
1

You can also try this:

public class StringReverse {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str = "Dogs hates cats";
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(str);
        System.out.println(sb.reverse());
    }
}
  • 2
    how is this different from the accepted answer? – vidstige Nov 11 '14 at 20:56
  • 1
    there are many method to reverse a string.this is one of them using stringbuffer class of java.accepted answer is using diff class to reverse which is not available in older version of JDK. – Anurag Goel Nov 14 '14 at 16:37
1
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String str = "Prashant";
    int len = str.length();
    char[] c = new char[len];
    for (int j = len - 1, i = 0; j >= 0; j--, i++) {
        c[i] = str.charAt(j);
    }
    str = String.copyValueOf(c);
    System.out.println(str);
}
  • 6
    Any answer to this question that doesn't use a built-in reverse() method is basically a wrong answer. – user456814 Jul 21 '14 at 14:23
  • 1
    Agreed, especially as these "simple" solutions don't take into account surrogate pairs and can actually corrupt the string - see my comment above. – Ian Fairman Sep 16 '14 at 14:29
1
public void reverString(){
System.out.println("Enter value");
BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
 try{

  String str=br.readLine();
  char[] charArray=str.toCharArray();
  for(int i=charArray.length-1; i>=0; i--){
   System.out.println(charArray[i]);
  }
  }
   catch(IOException ex){
  }
1

recursion:

 public String stringReverse(String string) {
    if (string == null || string.length() == 0) {
        return string;
    }
    return stringReverse(string.substring(1)) + string.charAt(0);
 }
1

Everybody proposes a way to reverse string here. If you, the reader of the answer, are interested in, my way using \u202E unicode is here.

public static String reverse(String s) {
        return "\u202E" + s;
}

It can be tested from here.

  • Didn't work. Trying to reverse "hello world" gives "?hello world" – Ricardo A. Apr 24 at 16:45
  • @RicardoA. Apparently the problem stems from you, yet from the code. You can glance at the link added in the answer as well. En passant, it is kinda trick just to show the output as reversed. If you put the returned string in an array char-by-char, it is possible to see that the order of the string is preserved except only \u202E character leads to it. – snr Apr 24 at 18:12
  • Seems to be something specific to some IDE or other environment stuff, I copied the exact same code from the link and run with the same java version (not subversion though) in eclipse. It still gives me "?hello world". – Ricardo A. Apr 24 at 19:18
  • @RicardoA. As I say, the problem stems from you, not the code. – snr Apr 24 at 19:44
1
public static String revString(String str){
    char[] revCharArr = str.toCharArray();
    for (int i=0; i< str.length()/2; i++){
        char f = revCharArr[i];
        char l = revCharArr[str.length()-i-1];
        revCharArr[i] = l;
        revCharArr[str.length()-i-1] = f;
    }
    String revStr = new String(revCharArr);
    return revStr;
}
0
package logicprogram;
import java.io.*;

public class Strinrevers {
public static void main(String args[])throws IOException
{
    BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    System.out.println("enter data");
    String data=br.readLine();
    System.out.println(data);
    String str="";
    char cha[]=data.toCharArray();

    int l=data.length();
    int k=l-1;
    System.out.println(l);


    for(int i=0;k>=i;k--)
    {

        str+=cha[k];


    }
    //String text=String.valueOf(ch);
    System.out.println(str);

}

}
0
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Scanner input = new Scanner (System.in);
        String word = input.next();
        String reverse = "";
        for(int i=word.length()-1; i>=0; i--)
            reverse += word.charAt(i);
        System.out.println(reverse);        
    }
}

If you want to use a simple for loop!

protected by Community Feb 2 '15 at 2:44

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