22

I'm looking for something that will translate a string as follows, using only bash / standard Linux commands:

  1. Single-quotes surrounding a string should be removed
  2. Double-quotes surrounding a string should be removed
  3. Unquoted strings should remain the same
  4. Strings with unmatched surrounding quotes should remain the same
  5. Single-quotes that don't surround the string should remain
  6. Double-quotes that don't surround the string should remain

For example:

  • 'Food' should become Food
  • "Food" should become Food
  • Food should remain the same
  • 'Food" should remain the same
  • "Food' should remain the same
  • 'Fo'od' should become Fo'od
  • "Fo'od" should become Fo'od
  • Fo'od should remain the same
  • 'Fo"od' should become Fo"od
  • "Fo"od" should become Fo"od
  • Fo"od should remain the same

Thank you!

3
  • 1
    +1 for all of those acceptance tests! – razlebe Apr 16 '09 at 21:37
  • 2
    As most "customers" do, an extra one's been added afterwards that wasn't in the original set :-) – richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:50
  • So.. backslash escapes are meaningless? "Food\" -> Food\ ? – lhunath Apr 17 '09 at 6:43
33

This should do it:

sed "s/^\([\"']\)\(.*\)\1\$/\2/g" in.txt

Where in.txt is:

"Fo'od'
'Food'
"Food"
"Fo"od'
Food
'Food"
"Food'
'Fo'od'
"Fo'od"
Fo'od
'Fo"od'
"Fo"od"
Fo"od

And expected.txt is:

"Fo'od'
Food
Food
"Fo"od'
Food
'Food"
"Food'
Fo'od
Fo'od
Fo'od
Fo"od
Fo"od
Fo"od

You can check they match with:

diff -s <(sed "s/^\([\"']\)\(.*\)\1\$/\2/g" in.txt) expected.txt
9
  • 1
    Very close :-) echo \"fo\"bar\' | sed "s/([\"'])(.*)\1/\2/g" Got: fobar' Expected: "fo"bar' – Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:42
  • Great! Just go changing the requirements after the coding is done ;-) updated for that case. – richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:46
  • 1
    Here's one final requirements change :-) echo \"fo\'bar\' | sed -e "s/([\"'])(.*)\1\$/\2/g" Got: "fobar Expected: "fo'bar' – Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:51
  • 5
    I hate regular expressions now. – richq Apr 16 '09 at 21:55
  • 2
    +1 for proving that 'Some people, when confronted with a problem, think “I know, I'll use regular expressions.” Now they have two problems.' Is as true as it gets! – Flávio Amieiro Apr 17 '09 at 1:17
20

You could use tr:

echo "$string" | tr -d 'chars to delete' 

... also works, however 'tr' is known to be problematic on much older (circa Redhat 9-ish) distributions. tr is an abbreviation for 'translate', commonly used in pipes to transform input. The -d option simply means 'delete'.

Most modern versions also contain predefined macros to transform upper to lower, lower to upper, kill white space, etc. Hence, if you use it, take a second to poke at what else it does (see the help output / man page), comes in handy.

15
VAR="'FOOD'"

VAR=$(eval echo $VAR)

Explanation: Since quotes are already understood by the shell you can ask the shell to evaluate a command that just echos the quoted string, the same way it does when you type it yourself.

Here, eval echo $VAR expands to eval echo 'FOOD' because the quotes are actually part of the value of VAR. If you were to run echo 'FOOD' into the shell you'd get FOOD (without the quotes). That's what eval does: it takes its input and runs it like a shell command.

⚠CODE INJECTION!

eval expose scripts to code injection.

VAR=';ls -l'

VAR=$(eval echo $VAR)

will cause execution of ls -l.

Much more harmful codes could be injected here.

2
  • 1
    please add some explanation too!! – Bhushan Kawadkar Jun 23 '14 at 6:07
  • I added some explanation and modernized the example a bit. – Elliot Cameron Feb 28 '17 at 3:25
9

You probably want to use sed...

echo $mystring | sed -s "s/^\(\(\"\(.*\)\"\)\|\('\(.*\)'\)\)\$/\\3\\5/g"
4
  • I have not idea if it works, but +1 for the awesomeness of your sed command :) – sigjuice Apr 16 '09 at 21:27
  • This is very close, but just a teeny bit off. echo \"fo\"bar\' | sed -s "s/^(\"(.*)\")\|(\'(.*)\')\$/\\2/g" Got: fobar' Expected: "fo"bar' – Jason Apr 16 '09 at 21:35
  • Yes... for some reason I can't fathom, the last $ stubbornly refuses to match the end of my string. Working on it... – Varkhan Apr 16 '09 at 21:50
  • Also, quote your parameter expansion. – lhunath Apr 17 '09 at 6:44
4

Just using Bash builtins (i.e. Bash parameter expansion):

IFS=' ' 

food_strings=( "'Food'" '"Food"' Food "'Food\"" "\"Food'" "'Fo'od'" "\"Fo'od\"" "Fo'od" "'Fo\"od'" '"Fo"od"' 'Fo"od'  )  

for food in ${food_strings[@]}; do 

   [[ "${food#\'}" != "$food" ]] && [[ "${food%\'}" != "$food" ]] && { food="${food#\'}"; food="${food%\'}"; } 

   [[ "${food#\"}" != "$food" ]] && [[ "${food%\"}" != "$food" ]] && { food="${food#\"}"; food="${food%\"}"; } 

   echo "$food"

done 

For yet another example of Bash parameter expansion see:

http://codesnippets.joyent.com/posts/show/1816

2

Just stumbled upon this as well. For the first three test cases, eval echo $string works well. To get it to work for all cases requested and a few others, I came up with this (tested with bash and dash):

#!/bin/sh

stripquotes() {
    local firstchar="`substr "$1" 0 1`"
    local len=${#1}
    local ilast=$((${#1} - 1))
    local lastchar="`substr "$1" $(($len - 1))`"
    if [ "$firstchar" = '"' ] || [ "$firstchar" = "'" ] && [ $firstchar = $lastchar ]; then
        echo "`substr "$1" 1 $(($len - 2))`"
    else
        echo "$1"
    fi
}

# $1 = String.
# $2 = Start index.
# $3 = Length (optional). If unspecified or an empty string, the length of the
#      rest of the string is used.
substr() {
    local "len=$3"
    [ "$len" = '' ] && len=${#1}
    if ! (echo ${1:$2:$len}) 2>/dev/null; then
        echo "$1" | awk "{ print(substr(\$0, $(($2 + 1)), $len)) }"
    fi
}

var="'Food'"
stripquotes "$var"

var='"Food"'
stripquotes "$var"

var=Food
stripquotes "$var"

var=\'Food\"
stripquotes "$var"

var=\"Food\'
stripquotes "$var"

var="'Fo'od'"
stripquotes "$var"

var="\"Fo'od\""
stripquotes "$var"

var="Fo'od"
stripquotes "$var"

var="'Fo\"od'"
stripquotes "$var"

var="\"Fo\"od\""
stripquotes "$var"

var="Fo\"od"
stripquotes "$var"

# A string with whitespace should work too.
var="'F\"o 'o o o' o\"d'"
stripquotes "$var"

# Strings that start and end with the same character that isn't a quote or
# doublequote should stay the same.
var="TEST"
stripquotes "$var"

# An empty string should not cause errors.
var=
stripquotes "$var"

# Strings of length 2 that begin and end with a quote or doublequote should not
# cause errors.
var="''"
stripquotes "$var"
var='""'
stripquotes "$var"
1
python -c "import sys;a=sys.stdin.read();a=a.strip();print (a[1:-1] if a[0]==a[-1] and a[0] in \"'\\\"\" else a)"

it doesn't handle edge cases extremely well (such as an empty string), but it will serve as a starting point. It works by striping the front and back character if they are the same and if they are ' or "

1
  • Jason explicitly said that he wants bash / standard Linux commands. Even though python is shipped with most of the commonly used distros, it is certainly not standard. If you install a basic Debian system, for example, it doesn't include python. – Flávio Amieiro Apr 17 '09 at 1:04

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