48

This is valid in php:

$x=$y='value';

This will in esscence set both $x and $y to 'value'.

Is this valid in javascript?

var x=y='value';

I have tested it in chrome console and it worked as expected, but just wanted to double check before starting to use it.

1

6 Answers 6

81

It only works if the var y as been previously defined, otherwise ywill be global.

In such case, you better do:

var x, y;
x = y = 'value';

Assignments Chaining

Another antipattern that creates implied globals is to chain assignments as part of a var declaration. In the following snippet, a is local but b becomes global, which is probably not what you meant to do:

// antipattern, do not use
function foo() {
   var a = b = 0;
   // ...
}

If you’re wondering why that happens, it’s because of the right-to-left evaluation. First, the expression b = 0 is evaluated and in this case b is not declared. The return value of this expression is 0, and it’s assigned to the new local variable declared with var a. In other words, it’s as if you’ve typed:

var a = (b = 0);

If you’ve already declared the variables, chaining assignments is fine and doesn’t create unexpected globals. Example:

function foo() {
   var a, b;
   // ...
   a = b = 0; // both local
}

“JavaScript Patterns, by Stoyan Stefanov (O’Reilly). Copyright 2010 Yahoo!, Inc., 9780596806750.”

0
14

I'm pretty sure that the most readable form is the one that has not been brought up yet:

let x = 0, y = 0
1
  • Thanks for sharing, upvoted! Unlike the accepted answer, this solution works on const as well. Commented Nov 12, 2021 at 13:49
8

To prevent the y from becoming a global variable, use the following:

var x, y = x = 'value';

Apparently the declarations are simply evaluated from left to right.

2
  • 3
    var x, y, z = y = x = 'value'; For whatever reasons ;)
    – yckart
    Commented May 7, 2017 at 12:47
  • 3
    Well ain't this just the cutest thing? Commented Oct 5, 2017 at 14:15
1

Yes, that is valid in Javascript.

However, after googling the problem, this Stack Overflow question explains some caveats, so use with caution.

1
0

When vars have different values you can easily write:

var x = 0,
    y = 1,
    ...
    z = 2;
0

In some cases involving objects and arrays, Assignments Chaining is not safe.

This is an example:

    const a = {}
  // Use Assignments Chaining to save some typing.
  a['foo'] = a['bar'] = []

  // I just want to set a['foo'] when some condition meets.
  for (let i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    a['foo'].push({ title: 'hello', number: i / 2 })
  }

  // But you maybe get this unexpected assignment.
  console.log(a['bar']) 
/*
  [
    {
      "title": "hello",
      "number": 0
    },
    {
      "title": "hello",
      "number": 0.5
    },
    {
      "title": "hello",
      "number": 1
    },
    {
      "title": "hello",
      "number": 1.5
    },
    {
      "title": "hello",
      "number": 2
    }
  ]
*/

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