40

I am new to SQL programming.

I have a table job where the fields are id, position, category, location, salary range, description, refno.

I want to implement a keyword search from the front end. The keyword can reside in any of the fields of the above table.

This is the query I have tried but it consist of so many duplicate rows:

SELECT
    a.*,
    b.catname
FROM
    job a,
    category b
WHERE
    a.catid = b.catid AND
    a.jobsalrange = '15001-20000' AND
    a.jobloc = 'Berkshire' AND
    a.jobpos LIKE '%sales%' OR
    a.jobloc LIKE '%sales%' OR
    a.jobsal LIKE '%sales%' OR
    a.jobref LIKE '%sales%' OR
    a.jobemail LIKE '%sales%' OR
    a.jobsalrange LIKE '%sales%' OR
    b.catname LIKE '%sales%'
0

7 Answers 7

59

For a single keyword on VARCHAR fields you can use LIKE:

SELECT id, category, location
FROM table
WHERE
(
    category LIKE '%keyword%'
    OR location LIKE '%keyword%'
)

For a description you're usually better adding a full text index and doing a Full-Text Search (MyISAM only):

SELECT id, description
FROM table
WHERE MATCH (description) AGAINST('keyword1 keyword2')
5
  • SELECT a. * , b.catname FROM job a, categiry b WHERE a.catid = b.catid AND a.jobsalrange = '15001-20000' AND a.jobloc = 'Berkshire' AND a.jobpos LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobloc LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobsal LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobref LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobemail LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobsalrange LIKE '%sales%' OR b.catname LIKE '%sales%' acualy this is the query I have tried but it consist so many duplicate rows.
    – santanu
    Commented Apr 17, 2009 at 8:53
  • 3
    You just need to bracket your ORs: WHERE a=b AND c=d AND (e LIKE f OR g LIKE i)
    – Greg
    Commented Apr 17, 2009 at 8:55
  • 3
    I don't think it's MYISAM only anymore. Commented Aug 13, 2013 at 19:32
  • 2
    InnoDB fulltext search is supported in MySQL 5.6.4 and above. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/fulltext-restrictions.html Commented Jul 26, 2014 at 22:04
  • 1
    (MyISAM only): comment saved me time trying to do a full text search on innoDB
    – JonoJames
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 16:41
7
SELECT 
    *
FROM 
    yourtable
WHERE 
    id LIKE '%keyword%' 
    OR position LIKE '%keyword%'
    OR category LIKE '%keyword%'
    OR location LIKE '%keyword%'
    OR description LIKE '%keyword%'
    OR refno LIKE '%keyword%';
3
  • SELECT a. * , b.catname FROM job a, categiry b WHERE a.catid = b.catid AND a.jobsalrange = '15001-20000' AND a.jobloc = 'Berkshire' AND a.jobpos LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobloc LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobsal LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobref LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobemail LIKE '%sales%' OR a.jobsalrange LIKE '%sales%' OR b.catname LIKE '%sales%' acualy this is the query I have tried but it consist so many duplicate rows.
    – santanu
    Commented Apr 17, 2009 at 8:54
  • Do you have multiple entries in table b with the same catid?
    – Jon Bright
    Commented Apr 17, 2009 at 9:18
  • @santanu you need to perform a join to avoid cartesian join (duplicates values) see here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartesian_product Commented Aug 18, 2018 at 11:24
6

Ideally, have a keyword table containing the fields:

Keyword
Id
Count (possibly)

with an index on Keyword. Create an insert/update/delete trigger on the other table so that, when a row is changed, every keyword is extracted and put into (or replaced in) this table.

You'll also need a table of words to not count as keywords (if, and, so, but, ...).

In this way, you'll get the best speed for queries wanting to look for the keywords and you can implement (relatively easily) more complex queries such as "contains Java and RCA1802".

"LIKE" queries will work but they won't scale as well.

6

Personally, I wouldn't use the LIKE string comparison on the ID field or any other numeric field. It doesn't make sense for a search for ID# "216" to return 16216, 21651, 3216087, 5321668..., and so on and so forth; likewise with salary.

Also, if you want to use prepared statements to prevent SQL injections, you would use a query string like:

SELECT * FROM job WHERE `position` LIKE CONCAT('%', ? ,'%') OR ...
6

I will explain the method i usally prefer:

First of all you need to take into consideration that for this method you will sacrifice memory with the aim of gaining computation speed. Second you need to have a the right to edit the table structure.

1) Add a field (i usually call it "digest") where you store all the data from the table.

The field will look like:

"n-n1-n2-n3-n4-n5-n6-n7-n8-n9" etc.. where n is a single word

I achieve this using a regular expression thar replaces " " with "-". This field is the result of all the table data "digested" in one sigle string.

2) Use the LIKE statement %keyword% on the digest field:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE digest LIKE %keyword%

you can even build a qUery with a little loop so you can search for multiple keywords at the same time looking like:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE 
 digest LIKE %keyword1% AND 
 digest LIKE %keyword2% AND 
 digest LIKE %keyword3% ... 
3
  • I like the multiple "LIKE" statements for the tokenized keywords.
    – Lotus
    Commented Sep 12, 2014 at 1:06
  • This solution looks more promising. But how can I achieve to show better matching results at the beginning?
    – PC.
    Commented Mar 12, 2015 at 9:07
  • Your solution suits for me very nicely.
    – user2309944
    Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 6:01
6

You can find another simpler option in a thread here: Match Against.. with a more detail help in 11.9.2. Boolean Full-Text Searches

This is just in case someone need a more compact option. This will require to create an Index FULLTEXT in the table, which can be accomplish easily.

Information on how to create Indexes (MySQL): MySQL FULLTEXT Indexing and Searching

In the FULLTEXT Index you can have more than one column listed, the result would be an SQL Statement with an index named search:

SELECT *,MATCH (`column`) AGAINST('+keyword1* +keyword2* +keyword3*') as relevance  FROM `documents`USE INDEX(search) WHERE MATCH (`column`) AGAINST('+keyword1* +keyword2* +keyword3*' IN BOOLEAN MODE) ORDER BY relevance;

I tried with multiple columns, with no luck. Even though multiple columns are allowed in indexes, you still need an index for each column to use with Match/Against Statement.

Depending in your criterias you can use either options.

2

I know this is a bit late but what I did to our application is this. Hope this will help someone tho. But it works for me:

SELECT * FROM `landmarks` WHERE `landmark_name` OR `landmark_description` OR `landmark_address` LIKE '%keyword'
OR `landmark_name` OR `landmark_description` OR `landmark_address` LIKE 'keyword%' 
OR `landmark_name` OR `landmark_description` OR `landmark_address` LIKE '%keyword%'
1
  • 1
    Well, as far as I know, the most later one contains all the former ones.
    – c-an
    Commented Dec 11, 2018 at 10:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.