15

I know most compilers allow both:

#include <stdio.h>

and

#include <cstdio>

But someone argued that <stdio.h> is not actually C++ standard. Is that true?

28

stdio.h is standard, but deprecated. Always prefer cstdio in C++.

[n3290: C.3.1/1]: For compatibility with the Standard C library, the C++ standard library provides the 18 C headers (D.5), but their use is deprecated in C++.

[n3290: D.5/3]: [ Example: The header <cstdlib> assuredly provides its declarations and definitions within the namespace std. It may also provide these names within the global namespace. The header <stdlib.h> assuredly provides the same declarations and definitions within the global namespace, much as in the C Standard. It may also provide these names within the namespace std. —end example ]

7
  • 7
    -1 the advice "Always prefer cstdio in C++" is ungood. cstdio does not guarantee a clean global namespace, so its only effect is that you have to write more qualifications or using statements or whatever to get portable code. I.e., it's more work for negative gain, which is as silly as possible => the advice is ungood. Sep 29 '11 at 11:26
  • 6
    @Alf: So you'd recommend deprecated headers? That seems silly. And using/qualifiers are a good thing. Sep 29 '11 at 11:29
  • 2
    in an international standard the term "deprecated" means "can be removed in a later version of the standard". however the C headers are not going to go away. they were optimistically deprecated in C++98, but AFAIK no implementation ever made the clean separation required by C++98, which is surely the reason why C++11 now allows the headers to pollute namespaces. Sep 29 '11 at 12:01
  • 6
    Your technical and historical analysis is accurate. But the headers are still deprecated and I see no reason to prefer them. If I see C headers in C++ code review, the code does not pass. End of. Sep 29 '11 at 13:15
  • 3
    As long as C and C++ compilers live together (most compilers have C and C++ mode) and use the same system include directory, the C headers will be there, even if they are removed from standard.
    – Calmarius
    Aug 26 '12 at 12:39
8

It's not true, because C++ main goal is backward compatibility with C. The only difference is that for

#include <cstdio>

all functions are in std namespace

3
  • Bit of a simplistic view. stdio.h may put things in std, and using it is deprecated anyway. Sep 29 '11 at 11:11
  • as long as C++ is going to be compatible with C it will be legal :D
    – GreenScape
    Sep 29 '11 at 11:14
  • 3
    But deprecated. And C++ is not 100% compatible with C of course. Sep 29 '11 at 11:16
3

The C standard headers are included in the C++ standard library for compatibility.

The difference is that identifiers in corresponding C++ headers must (also) be in std namespace, whereas identifiers in C headers must (also) be available in global namespace.

In addition, the <c...> headers add overloads for functions like abs, pow etc.

Also, C++ headers replace some C classification/comparison macros with overloaded functions.

13
  • You may not be aware of it, but they are. And I quoted that passage from the standard quarter of an hour ago. Sep 29 '11 at 11:29
  • -1 "In addition" is wrong: C++11 §D.5/2 "Every C header, each of which has a name of the form name.h, behaves as if each name placed in the standard library namespace by the corresponding cname header is placed within the global namespace scope." Sep 29 '11 at 11:51
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf: visitor was correct. Overloads for different input types for abs and similar functions are defined in <cmath> but not in <math.h> (which doesn't include abs at all; it's in <stdlib.h>, and only takes int.) Apr 19 '16 at 1:31
  • @Kundor: What's the very first word that you don't understand in C++11 §D.5/2 "Every C header, each of which has a name of the form name.h, behaves as if each name placed in the standard library namespace by the corresponding cname header is placed within the global namespace scope."? Apr 19 '16 at 1:50
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf: Well, my compiler doesn't understand it either, because what visitor and I said is what happens. Try it. Apr 19 '16 at 1:51
-1

The C++ standard library explicitly contains the C standard library, so is an entirely legitimate part of C++. And if you are talking about using #include <stdio.h> in C++ code, then you shouldn't do that, cause that's C syntax, in C++ code, you should use always cstdio

5
  • 1
    It's not "C syntax" any more than #include <cstdio> is. Sep 29 '11 at 11:12
  • I know, but it's not so common to see someone use #include <cstdio> in C code
    – Mansuro
    Sep 29 '11 at 11:20
  • 2
    That's because cstdio doesn't exist in C... I think you might be misunderstanding the meaning of the word "syntax". Sep 29 '11 at 11:21
  • 1
    -1 the advice "you shouldn't do that" is ungood. cstdio does not guarantee a clean global namespace, so its only effect is that you have to write more qualifications or using statements or whatever to get portable code. I.e., it's more work for negative gain, which is as silly as possible => the advice is ungood. Sep 29 '11 at 11:27
  • 1
    @AlfP.Steinbach I never said he should use cstdio, but if he had to use either stdio.h or cstdio in C++ code, he should be using cstdio
    – Mansuro
    Sep 29 '11 at 11:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.