97

I'm working on a site which has line breaks inserted as <br> in some of the headings. Assuming I can't edit the source HTML, is there a way with CSS I can ignore these breaks?

I'm mobile optimising the site so I don't really want to use JavaScript.

  • 1
    @Ben Johnson mk2: The answer to your question:"I would like a solution to @Aneesh Karthik C's answer for firefox and opera" is, that it is not possible with the use of br elements! The reasons are already explained numerous times! In my answer I showed you an alternative method to achieve the goal in valid, robust and cross browser way. – Netsurfer Feb 13 '14 at 15:12

10 Answers 10

174

With css, you can "hide" the br tags and they won't have an effect:

br {
    display: none;
}

If you only want to hide some within a specific heading type, just make your css more specific.

h3 br {
    display: none;
}
  • 10
    Make sure to take a look at Aneesh's answer too, it is relevant and fixes an issue that enobrev didn't consider in his. – Rick Calder Aug 7 '13 at 12:49
  • 1
    Agreed, Aneesh's answer is a fantastic addition. stackoverflow.com/a/18040142/14651 – enobrev Aug 10 '13 at 15:12
  • 2
    This solution does not work for Firefox. If the <br/> does not have space around it then it combines words around <br/> together. Here is the sample You can see discussion about it below – shinesecret Feb 17 '14 at 10:07
  • 1
    If your goal is responsive design, the only cross-browser solution is @Netsurfer's. It doesn't answer the question exactly as stated, but it does achieve the goal in all modern browsers. – Andrew Lundin Jul 25 '14 at 20:05
86

Note: This solution only works for Webkit browsers, which incorrectly apply pseudo-elements to self-closing tags.

As an addendum to above answers it is worth noting that in some cases one needs to insert a space instead of merely ignoring <br>:

For instance the above answers will turn

Monday<br>05 August

to

Monday05 August

as I had verified while I tried to format my weekly event calendar. A space after "Monday" is preferred to be inserted. This can be done easily by inserting the following in the CSS:

br  {
    content: ' '
}
br:after {
    content: ' '
}

This will make

Monday<br>05 August

look like

Monday 05 August

You can change the content attribute in br:after to ', ' if you want to separate by commas, or put anything you want within ' ' to make it the delimiter! By the way

Monday, 05 August

looks neat ;-)

See here for a reference.

As in the above answers, if you want to make it tag-specific, you can. As in if you want this property to work for tag <h3>, just add a h3 each before br and br:after, for instance.

It works most generally for a pseudo-tag.

  • 2
    so very very genius ! – jon Aug 6 '13 at 15:10
  • 9
    Good point but this seems to work only with Webkit browsers (Chrome & Safari) with Firefox and IE this technique doesn't work, check the jsfiddle.net/nicooprat/ZHxNA with Firefox and IE... any ideas how to replace a br with a space so that it works with all main braowsers? – firepol Sep 20 '13 at 5:56
  • 2
    not working in firefox – Ben Johnson mk2 Jan 16 '14 at 18:32
  • 4
    @firepol: Actually, Firefox and IE are doing things "correct" as a <br /> is one element that a pseudo-element is not supposed to work on. And content only works on pseudo-elements. – ScottS Feb 6 '14 at 20:33
  • 6
    This is very wrong solution, mainly bcause of what @ScottS already wrote. "Content" is supposed to work only with pseudo-elements, and pseudo-element aren't supposed to work with self closing tags. This may work for now, but I wouldn't dare to call this solution future-proof. – nd_macias Feb 13 '14 at 9:25
16

If you add in the style

br{
    display: none;
}

Then this will work. Not sure if it will work in older versions of IE though.

  • 2
    Sure it will... – BoltClock Sep 29 '11 at 11:34
  • 3
    this was posted earlier and have less votes.. how come? – Mr_Green Feb 13 '14 at 12:35
  • Sometimes, we just get ignored ;( – Tim B James Feb 13 '14 at 14:29
  • @TimBJames it does not work in FIREFOX you can check my detailed comment above – shinesecret Feb 17 '14 at 10:22
8

This is how I do it:

br { 
    display: inline;
    content: ' ';
    clear:none;
}
6

You can use span elements instead of the br if you want the white space method to work, as it depends on pseudo-elements which are "not defined" for replaced elements.

HTML

<p>
   To break lines<span class="line-break">in a paragraph,</span><span>don't use</span><span>the 'br' element.</span>
</p>

CSS

span {white-space: pre;}

span:after {content: ' ';}

span.line-break {display: block;}

span.line-break:after {content: none;}

DEMO

The line break is simply achieved by setting the appropriate span element to display:block.

By using IDs and/ or Classes in your HTML markup you can easily target every single or combination of span elements by CSS or use CSS selectors like nth-child().

So you can e.g. define different break points by using media queries for a responsive layout.

And you can also simply add/ remove/ toggle classes by Javascript (jQuery).

The "advantage" of this method is its robustness - works in every browser that supports pseudo-elements (see: Can I use - CSS Generated content).

As an alternative it is also possible to add a line break via pseudo-elements:

span.break:before {  
    content: "\A";
    white-space: pre;
}

DEMO

  • 3
    Did you miss this part of the question: "Assuming I cant edit the source html"? – ScottS Feb 8 '14 at 13:57
  • 1
    @ScottS: No, I did not. Maybe you missed the part:'I would like a solution to @Aneesh Karthik C's answer for firefox and opera' (as the one who started the bounty is not the OP). And the answer to this is, that it is not possible with <br>, at least not cross-browser. So I showed an alternative. – Netsurfer Feb 8 '14 at 14:22
  • 2
    No, I did not miss that part (that OP is different from bounty and the focus on Aneesh's answer). But Aneesh's answer is in the context of the whole question, to "Ignore <br> with CSS?" It seems rather obvious that if one has actual control of the html, then simply deleting the <br> elements solves the issue (presumably replacing them with spaces). So the whole issue with which the question as a whole is concerned about is when one does not have control of the html; complicated by the added stipulation that they really did not want to use javascript (for whatever reason) to solve it. – ScottS Feb 8 '14 at 18:30
  • The question "How to ignore <br> with CSS?" was already answered. And only if you are in control of the HTML that doesn't mean, that you want to change it. But in responsive design it is often desirable to be in control of line breaks (other than the automatic wrap). And in such cases the method of having white space or not controled by CSS (media queries) is at least "one method" to achieve the goal. – Netsurfer Feb 8 '14 at 19:54
  • This worked better for me now that the above solutions no longer work in firefox. – christoshrousis Mar 1 '16 at 17:39
1

For that you can just do like this:

br{display: none;}

and if it is inside some PRE tag, then you can and if you want the PRE tag to behave like a regular block element, you can use this CSS :

pre {white-space: normal;}

Or you can follow the style of Aneesh Karthik C like :

br  {content: ' '}
br:after {content: ' '}

I think you got it

  • I think you missed the point that pseudo-elements like ::before and ::after are at least "undefined" for "replaced elements" like br. So there will never be a consistent browser behaviour one can rely on! The only thing you can do, is to not use pseudo elements with these elements! – Netsurfer Feb 13 '14 at 12:13
1

As per your question, to solve this problem for Firefox and Opera using Aneesh Karthik C approach you need to add "float" right" attribute.

Check the example here. This CSS works in Firefox (26.0) , Opera (12.15), Chrome (32.0.1700) and Safari (7.0)

br {
   content: " ";  
   float:right; 
}

I hope this will answer your question!!

  • The content property only has effect on CSS pseudo elements. So it is absolutely useless in your demo! And how to "neutralize" a br is already answered (more than once). The question is about conditional white space. And as this requires the use of pseudo elements, it does not work with br. – Netsurfer Feb 13 '14 at 15:04
  • If you read the question carefully. You will understand the answer. I have seen the answer above that is the best to avoid <br> by just setting it to display:none. But as per the second question where he wants to find out how he can address issue that is coming in FF and Opera for Aneesh solution. – shinesecret Feb 13 '14 at 16:01
  • I have read not only the question but also all answers and comments very carefully. Content property for br is simply nonsense! And I still cannot see what the rest of your answer has to do with "conditional white space and line brekas"? Maybe you can explain it further more, please? – Netsurfer Feb 13 '14 at 16:42
  • 1
    Your example is misleading, as you have spaces already around the br elements. If you remove those, you will see it is not working to add any space. – ScottS Feb 14 '14 at 18:26
  • 1
    In your example you have three br elements, with spaces before and after the first and last one. It is those spaces that make it appear that your solution is working, when in fact it is not. When you remove those spaces, as I did in my revised example, you can see that your solution is not adding any space at all in Firefox. – ScottS Feb 15 '14 at 14:51
1

For me looks better like this:

Some text, Some text, Some text

br {
  display: inline;
  content: '';
}

br:after {
  content: ', ';
  display: inline-block;
}
<div style="display:block">
  <span>Some text</span>
  <br>
  <span>Some text</span>
  <br>
  <span>Some text</span>
</div>

0

While this question appears to already have been solved, the accepted answer didn't solve the problem for me on Firefox. Firefox (and possibly IE, though I haven't tried it) skip whitespaces while reading the contents of the "content" tag. While I completely understand why Mozilla would do that, it does bring its share of problems. The easiest workaround I found was to use non-breakable spaces instead of regular ones as shown below.

.noLineBreaks br:before{
content: '\a0'
}

Have a look.

  • 1
    Why does your fiddle not have the before element on a br? You don't even have a br in your html on the fiddle. Part of the issue is that before does not work on a br in some browsers. – ScottS Feb 12 '14 at 19:14
  • That is quite expected behaviour, as stated in the spec: 2.5.1 Common parser idioms – Netsurfer Feb 12 '14 at 22:29
  • Tha's certainly weird, it works when I apply it in my project. My text isn't all HTML, though, the content I'm altering comes from a database. Sorry my anwser didn't help, then. – Santo Guevarra Feb 13 '14 at 14:55
-1

You can simply convert it in a comment..

Or you can do this:

br {
display: none;
}

But if you do not want it why are you puting that there?

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