91

I have reviewed and tested the various functions for preventing the body ability to scroll whilst inside a div and have combined a function that should work.

$('.scrollable').mouseenter(function() {
    $('body').bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function() {
        return false;
    });
    $(this).bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function() {
        return true;
    });
});
$('.scrollable').mouseleave(function() {
    $('body').bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function() {
        return true;
    });
});
  • This is stopping all scrolling where as I want scrolling to still be possible inside the container
  • This is also not deactivating on mouse leave

Any ideas, or better ways of doing this?

  • u set the body as return false from mousewheel, maybe this is the problem, i suppose your container is inside the body right – Ricardo Binns Sep 29 '11 at 16:33
  • @ric_bfa yes but how to fix it – RIK Sep 29 '11 at 16:35
  • instead body, set your class/id container – Ricardo Binns Sep 29 '11 at 16:37
  • Perhaps I should clarify. When the mouse is inside the element '.scrollable' the body's ability to scroll should be deactivated – RIK Sep 29 '11 at 16:38
  • 4
    Isn't there a way to do this with all CSS and no JavaScript? – chharvey Oct 7 '12 at 4:43

14 Answers 14

163

Update 2: My solution is based on disabling the browser's native scrolling altogether (when cursor is inside the DIV) and then manually scrolling the DIV with JavaScript (by setting its .scrollTop property). An alternative and IMO better approach would be to only selectively disable the browser's scrolling in order to prevent the page scroll, but not the DIV scroll. Check out Rudie's answer below which demonstrates this solution.


Here you go:

$( '.scrollable' ).on( 'mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function ( e ) {
    var e0 = e.originalEvent,
        delta = e0.wheelDelta || -e0.detail;

    this.scrollTop += ( delta < 0 ? 1 : -1 ) * 30;
    e.preventDefault();
});

Live demo: https://jsbin.com/howojuq/edit?js,output

So you manually set the scroll position and then just prevent the default behavior (which would be to scroll the DIV or whole web-page).

Update 1: As Chris noted in the comments below, in newer versions of jQuery, the delta information is nested within the .originalEvent object, i.e. jQuery does not expose it in its custom Event object anymore and we have to retrieve it from the native Event object instead.

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  • 2
    @RobinKnight Nope, doesn't seem so. Here is the working demo: jsfiddle.net/XNwbt/1 and here is the demo with those lines removed: jsfiddle.net/XNwbt/2 – Šime Vidas Sep 30 '11 at 15:35
  • 1
    Your manual scrolling is backwards on Firefox 10, at least on Linux and Mac. Seems to work correctly if you make that -e.detail, tested in Firefox (Mac, Linux), Safari (Mac), and Chromium (Linux). – Anomie Apr 5 '12 at 16:25
  • 1
    @Anomie That is correct. The sign of Mozilla's .detail does not correspond to the sign of .wheelData (which is what Chrome/IE have), so we have to invert it manually. Thanks for fixing my answer. – Šime Vidas Apr 5 '12 at 19:07
  • 8
    I used this, thank! I needed to add this tho: if( e.originalEvent ) e = e.originalEvent; – Nikso Jun 29 '12 at 9:26
  • 2
    @ŠimeVidas I made an adjustment to this after I implemented it in my software. Not critical but possibly add a sanity check for the scroll property to prevent the deadlock scrolling when the element has no scroll. if ( $(this)[0].scrollHeight !== $(this).outerHeight() ) { //yourcode } will execute only when there is a scrollbar. – user0000001 Dec 12 '13 at 16:42
29

If you don't care about the compatibility with older IE versions (< 8), you could make a custom jQuery plugin and then call it on the overflowing element.

This solution has an advantage over the one Šime Vidas proposed, as it doesn't overwrite the scrolling behavior - it just blocks it when appropriate.

$.fn.isolatedScroll = function() {
    this.bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function (e) {
        var delta = e.wheelDelta || (e.originalEvent && e.originalEvent.wheelDelta) || -e.detail,
            bottomOverflow = this.scrollTop + $(this).outerHeight() - this.scrollHeight >= 0,
            topOverflow = this.scrollTop <= 0;

        if ((delta < 0 && bottomOverflow) || (delta > 0 && topOverflow)) {
            e.preventDefault();
        }
    });
    return this;
};

$('.scrollable').isolatedScroll();
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  • 2
    Thanks! I think its more appropriate to not overwrite default behavior. To cross-browser support it can be used jQuery Mouse Wheel plugin. – Meettya Jun 2 '13 at 17:57
  • Unfortunately this seems glitchy in Chrome 52 (OSX 10.10). Works perfectly in Safari, though. – frosty Aug 22 '16 at 5:02
  • 1
    Thank you! The other solutions made the scrolling super slow and buggy – agrublev May 18 '17 at 1:11
  • @wojcikstefan, I am getting this warning in chrome: [Violation] Added non-passive event listener to a scroll-blocking 'mousewheel' event. Consider marking event handler as 'passive' to make the page more responsive. – Syed Jul 27 '17 at 18:23
21

I think it's possible to cancel the mousescroll event sometimes: http://jsfiddle.net/rudiedirkx/F8qSq/show/

$elem.on('wheel', function(e) {
    var d = e.originalEvent.deltaY,
        dir = d < 0 ? 'up' : 'down',
        stop = (dir == 'up' && this.scrollTop == 0) || 
               (dir == 'down' && this.scrollTop == this.scrollHeight-this.offsetHeight);
    stop && e.preventDefault();
});

Inside the event handler, you'll need to know:

  • scrolling direction
    d = e.originalEvent.deltaY, dir = d < 0 ? 'up' : 'down' because a positive number means scrolling down
  • scroll position
    scrollTop for top, scrollHeight - scrollTop - offsetHeight for bottom

If you're

  • scrolling up, and top = 0, or
  • scrolling down, and bottom = 0,

cancel the event: e.preventDefault() (and maybe even e.stopPropagation()).

I think it's better to not override the browser's scrolling behaviour. Only cancel it when applicable.

It's probablt not perfectly xbrowser, but it can't be very hard. Maybe Mac's dual scroll direction is tricky though...

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  • 2
    how do i implement the same functionality for devices(tablets/phones) i guess touchmove is the binding event – ViVekH Jul 16 '15 at 19:51
3

see if this help you:

demo: jsfiddle

$('#notscroll').bind('mousewheel', function() {
     return false
});

edit:

try this:

    $("body").delegate("div.scrollable","mouseover mouseout", function(e){
       if(e.type === "mouseover"){
           $('body').bind('mousewheel',function(){
               return false;
           });
       }else if(e.type === "mouseout"){
           $('body').bind('mousewheel',function(){
               return true;
           });
       }
    });
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  • Your elements are separate, whereas one of mine is contained in the other. – RIK Sep 29 '11 at 16:43
3

A less hacky solution, in my opinion is to set overflow hidden on the body when you mouse over the scrollable div. This will prevent the body from scrolling, but an unwanted "jumping" effect will occur. The following solution works around that:

jQuery(".scrollable")
    .mouseenter(function(e) {
        // get body width now
        var body_width = jQuery("body").width();
        // set overflow hidden on body. this will prevent it scrolling
        jQuery("body").css("overflow", "hidden"); 
        // get new body width. no scrollbar now, so it will be bigger
        var new_body_width = jQuery("body").width();
        // set the difference between new width and old width as padding to prevent jumps                                     
        jQuery("body").css("padding-right", (new_body_width - body_width)+"px");
    })
    .mouseleave(function(e) {
        jQuery("body").css({
            overflow: "auto",
            padding-right: "0px"
        });
    })

You could make your code smarter if needed. For example, you could test if the body already has a padding and if yes, add the new padding to that.

|improve this answer|||||
3

In the solution above there is a little mistake regarding Firefox. In Firefox "DOMMouseScroll" event has no e.detail property,to get this property you should write the following 'e.originalEvent.detail'.

Here is a working solution for Firefox:

$.fn.isolatedScroll = function() {
    this.on('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function (e) {
        var delta = e.wheelDelta || (e.originalEvent && e.originalEvent.wheelDelta) || -e.originalEvent.detail,
            bottomOverflow = (this.scrollTop + $(this).outerHeight() - this.scrollHeight) >= 0,
            topOverflow = this.scrollTop <= 0;

        if ((delta < 0 && bottomOverflow) || (delta > 0 && topOverflow)) {
            e.preventDefault();
        }
    });
    return this;
};
|improve this answer|||||
  • This works pretty well except when you crash into the top or bottom of the div the first event carries into the body. Testing with 2-finger touch on chrome in osx. – johnb003 Jan 18 '17 at 1:25
3

here a simple solution without jQuery which does not destroy the browser native scroll (this is: no artificial/ugly scrolling):

var scrollable = document.querySelector('.scrollable');

scrollable.addEventListener('wheel', function(event) {
    var deltaY = event.deltaY;
    var contentHeight = scrollable.scrollHeight;
    var visibleHeight = scrollable.offsetHeight;
    var scrollTop = scrollable.scrollTop;

    if (scrollTop === 0 && deltaY < 0)
        event.preventDefault();
    else if (visibleHeight + scrollTop === contentHeight && deltaY > 0)
        event.preventDefault();
});

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ibcaliax/bwmzfmq7/4/

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3

Use below CSS property overscroll-behavior: contain; to child element

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2

Here is my solution I've used in applications.

I disabled the body overflow and placed the entire website html inside container div's. The website containers have overflow and therefore the user may scroll the page as expected.

I then created a sibling div (#Prevent) with a higher z-index that covers the entire website. Since #Prevent has a higher z-index, it overlaps the website container. When #Prevent is visible the mouse is no longer hovering the website containers, so scrolling isn't possible.

You may of course place another div, such as your modal, with a higher z-index than #Prevent in the markup. This allows you to create pop-up windows that don't suffer from scrolling issues.

This solution is better because it doesn't hide the scrollbars (jumping affect). It doesn't require event listeners and it's easy to implement. It works in all browsers, although with IE7 & 8 you have to play around (depends on your specific code).

html

<body>
  <div id="YourModal" style="display:none;"></div>
  <div id="Prevent" style="display:none;"></div>
  <div id="WebsiteContainer">
     <div id="Website">
     website goes here...
     </div>
  </div>
</body>

css

body { overflow: hidden; }

#YourModal {
 z-index:200;
 /* modal styles here */
}

#Prevent {
 z-index:100;
 position:absolute;
 left:0px;
 height:100%;
 width:100%;
 background:transparent;
}

#WebsiteContainer {
  z-index:50;
  overflow:auto;
  position: absolute;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}
#Website {
  position:relative;
}

jquery/js

function PreventScroll(A) { 
  switch (A) {
    case 'on': $('#Prevent').show(); break;
    case 'off': $('#Prevent').hide(); break;
  }
}

disable/enable the scroll

PreventScroll('on'); // prevent scrolling
PreventScroll('off'); // allow scrolling
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  • 2
    Please consider including some information about your answer, rather than simply posting code. We try to provide not just 'fixes', but help people learn. You should explain what was wrong in the original code, what you did differently, and why your change(s) worked. – Andrew Barber Aug 26 '14 at 19:08
1

I needed to add this event to multiple elements that might have a scrollbar. For the cases where no scrollbar was present, the main scrollbar didn't work as it should. So i made a small change to @Šime code as follows:

$( '.scrollable' ).on( 'mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function ( e ) {
    if($(this).prop('scrollHeight') > $(this).height())
    {
        var e0 = e.originalEvent, delta = e0.wheelDelta || -e0.detail;

        this.scrollTop += ( delta < 0 ? 1 : -1 ) * 30;
        e.preventDefault();
    }       
});

Now, only elements with a scrollbar will prevent the main scroll from begin stopped.

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0

Pure javascript version of Vidas's answer, el$ is the DOM node of the plane you are scrolling.

function onlyScrollElement(event, el$) {
    var delta = event.wheelDelta || -event.detail;
    el$.scrollTop += (delta < 0 ? 1 : -1) * 10;
    event.preventDefault();
}

Make sure you dont attach the even multiple times! Here is an example,

var ul$ = document.getElementById('yo-list');
// IE9, Chrome, Safari, Opera
ul$.removeEventListener('mousewheel', onlyScrollElement);
ul$.addEventListener('mousewheel', onlyScrollElement);
// Firefox
ul$.removeEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', onlyScrollElement);
ul$.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', onlyScrollElement);

Word of caution, the function there needs to be a constant, if you reinitialize the function each time before attaching it, ie. var func = function (...) the removeEventListener will not work.

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0

You can do this without JavaScript. You can set the style on both divs to position: fixed and overflow-y: auto. You may need to make one of them higher than the other by setting its z-index (if they overlap).

Here's a basic example on CodePen.

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0

Here is the plugin that is useful for preventing parent scroll while scrolling a specific div and has a bunch of options to play with.

Check it out here:

https://github.com/MohammadYounes/jquery-scrollLock

Usage

Trigger Scroll Lock via JavaScript:

$('#target').scrollLock();

Trigger Scroll Lock via Markup:

    <!-- HTML -->
<div data-scrollLock
     data-strict='true'
     data-selector='.child'
     data-animation='{"top":"top locked","bottom":"bottom locked"}'
     data-keyboard='{"tabindex":0}'
     data-unblock='.inner'>
     ...
</div>

<!-- JavaScript -->
<script type="text/javascript">
  $('[data-scrollLock]').scrollLock()
</script>

View Demo

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0

just offering this up as a possible solution if you don't think the user will have a negative experience on the obvious change. I simply changed the body's class of overflow to hidden when the mouse was over the target div; then I changed the body's div to hidden overflow when the mouse leaves.

Personally I don't think it looks bad, my code could use toggle to make it cleaner, and there are obvious benefits for making this effect possible without the user being aware. So this is probably the hackish-last-resort answer.

//listen mouse on and mouse off for the button
pxMenu.addEventListener("mouseover", toggleA1);
pxOptContainer.addEventListener("mouseout", toggleA2);
//show / hide the pixel option menu
function toggleA1(){
  pxOptContainer.style.display = "flex";
  body.style.overflow = "hidden";
}
function toggleA2(){
  pxOptContainer.style.display = "none";
  body.style.overflow = "hidden scroll";
}
|improve this answer|||||

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