6

I understand that Oracle sysdate returns the current date AND time. That's great for timestamp or datetime columns.

Now let's say I have a DATE only column. What keywords should I use on my insert query?

insert into myTable1(myDateOnlyColumn) values(???)

And let's say I have a TIME only column. What keywords should I use on my insert query?

 insert into myTable2(myTimeOnlyColumn) values(???)

Thanks!

8

There is no such thing as a DATE only column in Oracle. The DATE datatype stores date and time.

If you only care about the date, you can:

INSERT INTO tbl (dtCol) VALUES (TO_DATE('20110929','YYYYMMDD');

This leaves the time component at 00:00:00. You don't have to display it though.

If you're only interested in the time component, you still have a date stored in the column. You'll just have to handle that on output. For example:

SQL> CREATE TABLE dt (d DATE);

SQL> INSERT INTO dt VALUES (TO_DATE('1:164800','J:HH24MISS'));

1 row inserted

Showing the actual contents of the column reveals a date was inserted:

SQL> SELECT * FROM dt;

D
--------------------
0/0/0000 4:48:00 PM

Selecting only the time component from the column gives you the output you want:

SQL> SELECT TO_CHAR(d, 'HH24:MI:SS') d FROM dt;

D
--------
16:48:00

SQL> 

If you think you need only a time column, you'll want to make sure you always insert the same date component.

  • So it stores all zeros for the time part when I am storing a birthdate? How about TIME only columns? – TraderJoeChicago Sep 29 '11 at 22:48
  • Good answer. Also, if you have a date that includes hours, minutes and seconds: trunc(sysdate, 'd') to remove them rather than using TO_CHAR – WW. Sep 29 '11 at 23:04
  • 1
    @DCookie - Good answer. I'd cover the INTERVAL data types, though, for storing times. If you're only storing a time, you're generally storing a duration (i.e. 4 hours 48 minutes) which maps perfectly to an INTERVAL DAY TO SECOND rather than storing a time like 4:48 pm. – Justin Cave Sep 29 '11 at 23:21
  • @DCookie: Why do you have to pass that 'J' in there? Can I just plug sysdate into these transformations to get the current date and current time? – TraderJoeChicago Sep 30 '11 at 0:29
  • @Sergio, you don't have to, I just used a julian date of 1 to get the year/month/day component to zeroes. Otherwise, you'll wind up with some sort of actual date in there, which, if you're trying to implement a "time only" column might confuse the issue. – DCookie Sep 30 '11 at 4:03
14

To remove time from sysdate you can just write TRUNC(sysdate).

For example:

SELECT TRUNC(SYSDATE) "TODAY" FROM DUAL;

will give you:

TODAY                     
------------------------- 
'2012-10-02 00:00:00'     
0
select sysdate, to_date(to_char(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy'),'dd/mm/yyyy') d
from dual
  • 1
    You need to explain why this code will resolve an Op's question already answered? – bcesars Mar 27 '15 at 12:53

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