1

I have class like this:

public ClassA<T> where T : class{
       ...
}

Now I need to to create an object of ClassA in the constructor of ClassB:

public ClassB{
   public ClassA<?> objA;
   public ClassB(string TypeInfo){
       objA = new ClassA<?>(); // Suppose TypeInfo = 'ClassC', and the '?'
                               // Should be derived from TypeInfo
   }
   ...
}

I don't know what to replace '?' for, since the type can only be known at runtime... any ideas?

4
  • 2
    Note: I think ClassA needs to declare where T : class, new() if you want to use the default constructor. Also, @ArturMustafin is mistaken. Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 4:53
  • I want the 'TypeInfo' to be a string representation of an object type.
    – Rn2dy
    Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:00
  • I'm correct, because there is no reason to use generics for the types, not known at compile time, because generics is used only for the KNOWN types, which means you can always make a substitution of a generic parameter with a type. The only matching type in this situation is object type Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:20
  • The only way to use a type not known at compile time is resolve the type at run time, make the ClassB generic, and use ILGeberator() for the generic ClassB to instantiate of construction of generic ClassA that at the run-time Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:29

4 Answers 4

10

The closest to determining and creating the generic type at runtime that you'll probably get (using a string that represents the type name) is instantiating it like this.

public class ClassB
{
    public ClassB(string typeInfo)
    {
        var typeOfT = Type.GetType(typeInfo);
        var type = typeof(ClassA<>).MakeGenericType(typeOfT);
        var instance = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
    }
}

Exposing that directly through a public field will not be doable unless you mark your field as dynamic, because otherwise it will need that generic type information up front.

public dynamic objA;

Also, the string that represents the type must be qualified enough so that it can be located without ambiguity by Type.GetType(). For example, SomeNamespace.ClassC instead of ClassC.

1
  • Nice code. Although this can't solve the class definition problem, creating a generic type is a neat trick. Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:32
0

use object o = Activator.CreateInstance(constructed);

this came from MSDN http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.activator.createinstance.aspx

edit

we use it in extension methods like;

public static object DefaultValue(this Type targetType) { return targetType.IsValueType ? Activator.CreateInstance(targetType) : null; }

It's not a huge stretch to make it work with generics

1
  • You will fall into my soultion because of use object type Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:22
0

Since objA is part of the definition of ClassB, ClassB will have to have to have a type parameter if ClassA has a type parameter, i.e.

public ClassB<T>
{
   public ClassA<T> objA
   ...
}

If the type of objA is not known at compile time it will have to be of type Object or a non-generic base or interface. There's no middle ground.

2
  • The goal is to use the 'TypeInfo' as a source of type information.
    – Rn2dy
    Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:11
  • @baboonWorksFine - of course it's possible to construct type definitions dynamically - that's how the C# compiler works! But you are tying to go beyond the limits of C# class definition syntax Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:25
-1

There is no reason to use generics for the types not known at compile time, because generics is used only for the KNOWN types, which means you can always make a substitution of a generic parameter with a type.

The only matching type in the questioned situation is object type which is a base class for the all object types, and is always known to the compiler.

public ClassB{ 
   public ClassA<object> objA; 
   public ClassB(string TypeInfo){ 
       objA = new ClassA<object>();
   } 
   ... 
} 

About your question...

The only way to use a type not known at compile time is resolve the type at run time, make the ClassB generic, and use ILGenerator() for the generic class A to instantiate of construction of that class at the run-time.

public ClassB<T>{ 
   public ClassA<T> objA; 
   public ClassB(){ 
       objA = new ClassA<T>();
   } 
   ... 
} 
4
  • 5
    Wouldn't having a ClassA that's of type object defeat the purpose of using generics?
    – Tim
    Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 4:49
  • The question itself is incorrect. There is no reason to use generics for types, being resloved at runtime Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:18
  • Removed my downvote now that you actually explained your answer. Others will not always understand your point if you only provide code. Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:29
  • @Artur - Well, yes. The question itself didn't make much sense to me, but I figured maybe there was some nuance the OP was aware of (or constrained by) that I didn't know about.
    – Tim
    Commented Sep 30, 2011 at 5:37

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