6

I have a file that looks like this:

14757,file_one
14756,file_two
14755,file_three

I want to loop over each line and refer to tuple components by separate variables. For example, when iterating over the first line, $1 would be 14757 and $2 would have a value of file_one.

I try to achieve this with:

for i in $(cat files.txt); do IFS=","; set -- $i; echo $1 and $2; done

However, it loops over each word, and the result is not what I expect:

14757 and
file_one
14756 and
file_two
14755 and
file_three and

This is what I want:

14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

I tried to adapt solutions posted in question Loop over tuples in Bash without success.

9
  • 4
    Please show us what you've tried, and explain how it didn't work (Were there errors? Incorrect output? If so, what did it look like?).
    – larsks
    Commented Apr 26, 2023 at 12:57
  • 1
    "I tried to adapt solutions posted in question Loop over tuples in bash? without success." What code did you end up with when you tried to adapt the solutions? What happened when you tried those versions of the code, and how is that different from what you wanted? Commented Apr 27, 2023 at 18:21
  • 1
    Is the important thing here the format of the output or the variable assignment? In other words, are you trying to convert commas to ` and ` or is the important thing to loop over the pairs and assign them to variables so that you can do something more complex with them than just print them with the word "and" in between? Commented Apr 27, 2023 at 20:03
  • 1
    You should edit your question to show the URLs that you actually want as your output rather than fake output like 14757 and file_one Commented Apr 28, 2023 at 8:02
  • 1
    You are getting answers that just replace the , with the word "and." That probably isn't helpful and in this case I think you simplified a bit too much. At the same time, you also made it more complicated by introducing the requirement for variables. Variables aren't really needed here, they are just a means to an end, and probably not the best way to get the results you want. Commented Apr 28, 2023 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

6

If that's what you feel you need, then

$: while IFS=$'",\n' read -a line; do set -- "${line[@]}"; shift; echo $1 and $2; done <tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

I used the quotes as delimiters as well as the comma, which creates a leading empty field in cell 0, so I shift it off.

...but unless there is a compelling reason, just use the array.

$: while IFS=$'",\n' read -a fields; do echo "${fields[1]} and ${fields[2]}"; done <tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

awk would be a lot more efficient, and notably faster if the result set is very big -

$: awk -F'[",]' '{print $2" and "$3}' tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

or even sed -

$: sed 's/^"//; s/"$//; s/,/ and /;' tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

This one is a little more direct and mechanical, but if you read regexes it's pretty easy to understand: trim the leading quote, trim the trailing quote, convert the comma. I could have used s/"//g, but I suspect the two anchored substitutions are faster than scanning the whole string since I know where the quotes are. It likely doesn't matter here, but worth mentioning for when you're processing a multi-GB file and you want to shave a little time.

If you actually did pipe your data through a tr and remove the quotes, then all these are a little simpler, as they don't have to deal with that anymore, and you don't ignore the first empty field.

$: while IFS=, read -a line; do set -- "${line[@]}"; echo $1 and $2; done <tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

$: while IFS=, read -a fields; do echo "${fields[0]} and ${fields[1]}"; done <tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

$: while read -r line; do echo "${line/,/ and }"; done <tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

$: f=$(<tmp); echo "${f//,/ and }" # efficient
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

$: awk -F, '{print $1 " and " $2}' tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three

$: sed 's/,/ and /;' tmp
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three
5

A variation on the while/read loop:

$ while IFS=, read -r arg1 arg2; do echo "${arg1} and ${arg2}"; done < files.txt
14757 and file_one
14756 and file_two
14755 and file_three
0

The naming of your variables, $1 and $2, is a give-away. You mean you have heard somewhere of a technology, called awk, but you have forgotten its name :-)

Let me show you an example:

awk -F " " '{print $1 " blabla " $2}' file.txt

Result:

14757 blabla file_one
14756 blabla file_two
14755 blabla file_three

For your information: the flag -F " " means that I use a space as a separator.

In case you have problems with double quotes in your output, you can simply remove them adding | tr -d "\"" at the end of your command, so you get:

awk -F " " '{print $1 " blabla " $2}' file.txt | tr -d "\""
0

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