35

I have some text (meaningful text or arithmetical expression) and I want to split it into words.
If I had a single delimiter, I'd use:

std::stringstream stringStream(inputString);
std::string word;
while(std::getline(stringStream, word, delimiter)) 
{
    wordVector.push_back(word);
}

How can I break the string into tokens with several delimiters?

7
  • Boost.StringAlgorithm or Boost.Tokenizer would help.
    – K-ballo
    Oct 1 '11 at 17:14
  • Or, some idea you can get from this answer : stackoverflow.com/questions/4888879/…
    – Nawaz
    Oct 1 '11 at 17:17
  • 3
    @K-ballo: According to the question, you should not use external libraries like Boost.
    – masoud
    Oct 1 '11 at 17:17
  • 1
    @MasoudM.: Does Boost still count as an external library ;) ? As far as I am concerned, Boost is like my Standard Library, it's built-in! Oct 1 '11 at 17:30
  • 1
    @MatthieuM.: Then, Qt is not external library for me too.
    – masoud
    Oct 1 '11 at 17:51
47

Assuming one of the delimiters is newline, the following reads the line and further splits it by the delimiters. For this example I've chosen the delimiters space, apostrophe, and semi-colon.

std::stringstream stringStream(inputString);
std::string line;
while(std::getline(stringStream, line)) 
{
    std::size_t prev = 0, pos;
    while ((pos = line.find_first_of(" ';", prev)) != std::string::npos)
    {
        if (pos > prev)
            wordVector.push_back(line.substr(prev, pos-prev));
        prev = pos+1;
    }
    if (prev < line.length())
        wordVector.push_back(line.substr(prev, std::string::npos));
}
1
  • 4
    You're too fast for me :p If newline is not a delimiter, then simply picking one of the "regular" delimiters (and removing it from the inner loop) will work. Oct 1 '11 at 17:32
20

If you have boost, you could use:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
std::string inputString("One!Two,Three:Four");
std::string delimiters("|,:");
std::vector<std::string> parts;
boost::split(parts, inputString, boost::is_any_of(delimiters));
1
  • 18
    that's like asking someone to open a jar of pickles, and you pull out a chainsaw.
    – Dmitry
    Jul 27 '19 at 3:29
11

Using std::regex

A std::regex can do string splitting in a few lines:

std::regex re("[\\|,:]");
std::sregex_token_iterator first{input.begin(), input.end(), re, -1}, last;//the '-1' is what makes the regex split (-1 := what was not matched)
std::vector<std::string> tokens{first, last};

Try it yourself

5
  • 1
    How come this has only few up votes. This is absolutely brilliant ! Few lines, no need for external library and something novel. Thank you very much ! Jul 8 '20 at 9:31
  • 1
    @berkayberabi no problem - it was a late answer, I think thats why. If you want to, you can post a bounty to reward an existing answer (that also draws attention).
    – darune
    Jul 8 '20 at 9:40
  • Hi I dont have that much reputation. But one more question I have. If I also want to split based on brackets as delimeter([]) how can I pass the brackets. If I just enter them, they will be interpreted as another regular expression and it does not work Jul 9 '20 at 9:36
  • 1
    @berkayberabi escape via \\]
    – darune
    Jul 9 '20 at 11:08
  • How about this case? text = "Windows. Apple"; I only want to see ['Windows' , 'Apple']. This regex gives [Windows ,' ', Apple], which contains a space (' ') I dont want.
    – cpchung
    May 8 at 3:06
5

I don't know why nobody pointed out the manual way, but here it is:

const std::string delims(";,:. \n\t");
inline bool isDelim(char c) {
    for (int i = 0; i < delims.size(); ++i)
        if (delims[i] == c)
            return true;
    return false;
}

and in function:

std::stringstream stringStream(inputString);
std::string word; char c;

while (stringStream) {
    word.clear();

    // Read word
    while (!isDelim((c = stringStream.get()))) 
        word.push_back(c);
    if (c != EOF)
        stringStream.unget();

    wordVector.push_back(word);

    // Read delims
    while (isDelim((c = stringStream.get())));
    if (c != EOF)
        stringStream.unget();
}

This way you can do something useful with the delims if you want.

1
  • 1
    You can move std::string word; and char c; inside the loop and avoid using clear()... variables should be as local and short-lived as possible.
    – Mohan
    Dec 4 '17 at 21:15
1

If you interesting in how to do it yourself and not using boost.

Assuming the delimiter string may be very long - let say M, checking for every char in your string if it is a delimiter, would cost O(M) each, so doing so in a loop for all chars in your original string, let say in length N, is O(M*N).

I would use a dictionary (like a map - "delimiter" to "booleans" - but here I would use a simple boolean array that has true in index = ascii value for each delimiter).

Now iterating on the string and check if the char is a delimiter is O(1), which eventually gives us O(N) overall.

Here is my sample code:

const int dictSize = 256;    

vector<string> tokenizeMyString(const string &s, const string &del)
{
    static bool dict[dictSize] = { false};

    vector<string> res;
    for (int i = 0; i < del.size(); ++i) {      
        dict[del[i]] = true;
    }

    string token("");
    for (auto &i : s) {
        if (dict[i]) {
            if (!token.empty()) {
                res.push_back(token);
                token.clear();
            }           
        }
        else {
            token += i;
        }
    }
    if (!token.empty()) {
        res.push_back(token);
    }
    return res;
}


int main()
{
    string delString = "MyDog:Odie, MyCat:Garfield  MyNumber:1001001";
//the delimiters are " " (space) and "," (comma) 
    vector<string> res = tokenizeMyString(delString, " ,");

    for (auto &i : res) {

        cout << "token: " << i << endl;
    }
return 0;
}

Note: tokenizeMyString returns vector by value and create it on the stack first, so we're using here the power of the compiler >>> RVO - return value optimization :)

1

And here, ages later, a solution using C++20:

constexpr std::string_view words{"Hello-_-C++-_-20-_-!"};
constexpr std::string_view delimeters{"-_-"};
for (const std::string_view word : std::views::split(words, delimeters)) {
    std::cout << std::quoted(word) << ' ';
}
// outputs: Hello C++ 20!

Required headers:

#include <ranges>
#include <string_view>

Reference: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/ranges/split_view

0

Using Eric Niebler's range-v3 library:

https://godbolt.org/z/ZnxfSa

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include "range/v3/all.hpp"

int main()
{
    std::string s = "user1:192.168.0.1|user2:192.168.0.2|user3:192.168.0.3";
    auto words = s  
        | ranges::view::split('|')
        | ranges::view::transform([](auto w){
            return w | ranges::view::split(':');
        });
      ranges::for_each(words, [](auto i){ std::cout << i  << "\n"; });
}
2

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