117

I want to use a annotated prototype bean in my controller. But spring is creating a singleton bean instead. Here is the code for that:

@Component
@Scope("prototype")
public class LoginAction {

  private int counter;

  public LoginAction(){
    System.out.println(" counter is:" + counter);
  }
  public String getStr() {
    return " counter is:"+(++counter);
  }
}

Controller code:

@Controller
public class HomeController {
    @Autowired
    private LoginAction loginAction;

    @RequestMapping(value="/view", method=RequestMethod.GET)
    public ModelAndView display(HttpServletRequest req){
        ModelAndView mav = new ModelAndView("home");
        mav.addObject("loginAction", loginAction);
        return mav;
    }

    public void setLoginAction(LoginAction loginAction) {
        this.loginAction = loginAction;
    }

    public LoginAction getLoginAction() {
        return loginAction;
    }
    }

Velocity template:

 LoginAction counter: ${loginAction.str}

Spring config.xml has component scanning enabled:

    <context:annotation-config />
    <context:component-scan base-package="com.springheat" />
    <mvc:annotation-driven />

I'm getting an incremented count each time. Can't figure out where am I going wrong!

Update

As suggested by @gkamal, I made HomeController webApplicationContext-aware and it solved the problem.

updated code:

@Controller
public class HomeController {

    @Autowired
    private WebApplicationContext context;

    @RequestMapping(value="/view", method=RequestMethod.GET)
    public ModelAndView display(HttpServletRequest req){
        ModelAndView mav = new ModelAndView("home");
        mav.addObject("loginAction", getLoginAction());
        return mav;
    }

    public LoginAction getLoginAction() {
        return (LoginAction) context.getBean("loginAction");
    }
}
  • 12
    I wish I could double upvote you for implementing the correct answer in your code for others to see the actual difference – Ali Nem Dec 25 '16 at 5:23

11 Answers 11

139

Scope prototype means that every time you ask spring (getBean or dependency injection) for an instance it will create a new instance and give a reference to that.

In your example a new instance of LoginAction is created and injected into your HomeController . If you have another controller into which you inject LoginAction you will get a different instance.

If you want a different instance for each call - then you need to call getBean each time - injecting into a singleton bean will not achieve that.

  • 6
    I made the controller ApplicationContextAware and did getBean and I'm getting the fresh bean every time. Thanks guys!!! – tintin Oct 1 '11 at 18:26
  • How does this work if the bean would have had request scope instead of prototype scope. Would you still need to retrieve the bean with context.getBean(..)? – dr jerry Feb 24 '15 at 10:07
  • 1
    Or use a scoped proxy, i.e. @Scope(value="prototype", proxyMode = ScopedProxyMode.TARGET_CLASS) – svenmeier Jul 11 '16 at 15:12
17

Since Spring 2.5 there's a very easy (and elegant) way to achieve that.

You can just change the params proxyMode and value of the @Scope annotation.

With this trick you can avoid to write extra code or to inject the ApplicationContext every time that you need a prototype inside a singleton bean.

Example:

@Service 
@Scope(value="prototype", proxyMode=ScopedProxyMode.TARGET_CLASS)  
public class LoginAction {}

With the config above LoginAction (inside HomeController) is always a prototype even though the controller is a singleton.

  • Seems like a good, easy and elegant solution. – Nikolay Chernov Jul 17 '18 at 15:03
  • 1
    So we dont have it now in spring 5 ? – Raghuveer Mar 8 at 7:47
12

Just because the bean injected into the controller is prototype-scoped doesn't mean the controller is!

9

@controller is a singleton object, and if inject a prototype bean to a singleton class will make the prototype bean also as singleton unless u specify using lookup-method property which actually create a new instance of prototype bean for every call you make.

4

As mentioned by nicholas.hauschild injecting Spring context is not a good idea. In your case, @Scope("request") is enough to fix it. But let say you need several instances of LoginAction in controller method. In this case, I would recommend to create the bean of Supplier (Spring 4 solution):

    @Bean
    public Supplier<LoginAction> loginActionSupplier(LoginAction loginAction){
        return () -> loginAction;
    }

Then inject it into controller:

@Controller
public class HomeController {
    @Autowired
    private  Supplier<LoginAction> loginActionSupplier;  
  • 1
    I would suggest injecting springs ObjectFactory which serves the same purpose as supplier, but can be defined as a normal @Bean by which I mean no need to return a lambda. – xenoterracide Nov 29 '18 at 19:14
3

Using ApplicationContextAware is tying you to Spring (which may or may not be an issue). I would recommend passing in a LoginActionFactory, which you can ask for a new instance of a LoginAction each time you need one.

  • 1
    There's already Spring-specific annotations, though; doesn't seem like that's much of a concern. – Dave Newton Oct 1 '11 at 21:05
  • 1
    @Dave, Good point. There are alternatives for some of the DI stuff (JSR 311), but it may be harder to rid yourself of everything Spring dependent in this example. I suppose I am really just advocating the factory-method here... – nicholas.hauschild Oct 1 '11 at 21:17
  • 1
    +1 for injecting a singleton LoginActionFactory into the Controller, but factory-method doesn't seem like it would solve the issue as it just creates another spring bean via the factory. Injecting that bean into the singleton Controller won't address the problem. – Brad Cupit Feb 21 '13 at 15:11
  • Good point Brad, I will remove that suggestion from my answer. – nicholas.hauschild Feb 21 '13 at 15:40
3

use request scope @Scope("request") to get bean for each request, or @Scope("session") to get bean for each session 'user'

0

A protoype bean injected inside a singelton bean will behave like singelton untill expilictly called for creating a new instance by get bean.

context.getBean("Your Bean")
0

@Component

@Scope(value="prototype")

public class TennisCoach implements Coach {

// some code

}

0

You can create static class inside your controller like this :

    @Controller
    public class HomeController {
        @Autowired
        private LoginServiceConfiguration loginServiceConfiguration;

        @RequestMapping(value = "/view", method = RequestMethod.GET)
        public ModelAndView display(HttpServletRequest req) {
            ModelAndView mav = new ModelAndView("home");
            mav.addObject("loginAction", loginServiceConfiguration.loginAction());
            return mav;
        }


        @Configuration
        public static class LoginServiceConfiguration {

            @Bean(name = "loginActionBean")
            @Scope("prototype")
            public LoginAction loginAction() {
                return new LoginAction();
            }
        }
}
-8

your controller also need the @Scope("prototype") defind

like this:

@Controller
@Scope("prototype")
public class HomeController { 
 .....
 .....
 .....

}
  • why do u think controller also needs to be prototype? – Jigar Parekh Oct 29 '12 at 13:43
  • 8
    This is just plain wrong. – Michal M Nov 9 '15 at 10:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.