17

I want to validate an email introduced inside an EditText and this the code that I already have:

final EditText textMessage = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.textMessage);

final TextView text = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.text);

    textMessage.addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() { 
        public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) { 
            if (textMessage.getText().toString().matches("[a-zA-Z0-9._-]+@[a-z]+.[a-z]+") && s.length() > 0)
            {
                text.setText("valid email");
            }
            else
            {
                text.setText("invalid email");
            }
        } 
        public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {} 
        public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {} 
    }); 

The problem is that when I introduce 3 characters after the "@", it appears the message "valid email", when it must appear when I introduce the complete email.

Any suggerence?

Thank you all!

4
  • I would also suggest adding a '+' as a valid character as it is possible to have email addresses like this: my+email@somemail.com.
    – Jan S.
    Oct 3, 2011 at 4:06
  • Thank you for your suggestion. Added to my code ;)
    – anonymous
    Oct 6, 2011 at 8:55
  • That's great :) I usually don't like when a website does not accept valid email characters.
    – Jan S.
    Oct 6, 2011 at 21:05
  • Please refere this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/12947620/… Apr 15, 2013 at 4:43

9 Answers 9

23

Just change your regular expression as follows:

"[a-zA-Z0-9._-]+@[a-z]+\\.+[a-z]+"

Because . (dot) means match any single-char.ADD a double backslash before your dot to stand for a real dot.

4
  • 2
    that's it, you've got to escape the dot
    – asenovm
    Oct 2, 2011 at 11:51
  • 1
    It worked perfectly! Thank you very much!
    – anonymous
    Oct 2, 2011 at 11:52
  • 3
    Isn't that going to validate a@foo....com but not a@foo.co.uk or a@foo9.com?
    – Ken Y-N
    May 28, 2012 at 7:06
  • Worked for me Thanks :) Jun 15, 2013 at 6:23
15

I wrote a library that extends EditText which supports natively some validation methods and is actually very flexible.

Current, as I write, natively supported (through xml attributes) validation methods are:

  1. regexp: for custom regexp
  2. numeric: for an only numeric field
  3. alpha: for an alpha only field
  4. alphaNumeric: guess what?
  5. email: checks that the field is a valid email
  6. creditCard: checks that the field contains a valid credit card using Luhn Algorithm
  7. phone: checks that the field contains a valid phone number
  8. domainName: checks that field contains a valid domain name ( always passes the test in API Level < 8 )
  9. ipAddress: checks that the field contains a valid ip address webUrl: checks that the field contains a valid url ( always passes the test in API Level < 8 )
  10. nocheck: It does not check anything. (Default)

You can check it out here: https://github.com/vekexasia/android-form-edittext

Hope you enjoy it :)

In the page I linked you'll be able to find also an example for email validation. I'll copy the relative snippet here:

<com.andreabaccega.widget.FormEditText
       style="@android:style/Widget.EditText"
       whatever:test="email"
       android:id="@+id/et_email"
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content"
       android:hint="@string/hint_email"
       android:inputType="textEmailAddress"
       />  

There is also a test app showcasing the library possibilities.

This is a screenshot of the app validating the email field.

email validation done thorugh xml+library

4
  • 1
    I'll take a look! Thank you! :)
    – anonymous
    May 25, 2012 at 13:26
  • 1
    TRIPLE LIKE..!! Nice work dude. Congrats..! :)
    – Jashan PJ
    Jun 6, 2013 at 8:08
  • thanks ;) Really appreciated Jun 12, 2013 at 16:17
  • have u used any specific jar file because when i copy the above code i am getting error in first line so asking @AndreaBaccega
    – Sandeep V
    May 2, 2014 at 7:54
5
public boolean validateEmail(String email) {

Pattern pattern;
Matcher matcher;
String EMAIL_PATTERN = "^[_A-Za-z0-9-]+(\\.[_A-Za-z0-9-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+(\\.[A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$";
pattern = Pattern.compile(EMAIL_PATTERN);
matcher = pattern.matcher(email);
return matcher.matches();

}
1
  • It worked for me. Thanks Jan 15, 2013 at 11:16
4

If you are using API 8 or above, you can use the readily available Patterns class to validate email. Sample code:

public final static boolean isValidEmail(CharSequence target) {
    if (target == null) {
        return false;
    } else {
        return android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(target).matches();
    }
}

By chance if you are even supporting API level less than 8, then you can simply copy the Patterns.java file into your project and reference it. You can get the source code for Patterns.java from this link

3

Several good options here including android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS for API 8+.

https://stackoverflow.com/a/7882950/1011746

1

Don't do it in code. You can use inputType attribute of EditText.

    <EditText 
        android:id="@+id/edit_text"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:inputType="textEmailAddress"/>
1
  • 3
    But I want to use that because if the user introduces something that is not an email e.g: example.com, he won't be able to hit the button in order to register himself. The example code that you post is only for the keyboard. Thank you for your quick reply, but it is not what I was looking for.
    – anonymous
    Oct 2, 2011 at 11:13
1

Try this pattern.....

editText.addTextChangedListener(new TextWatcher() {

        @Override
        public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
            pattern = Pattern.compile(".+@.+\\.[a-z]+");
            matcher = pattern.matcher(editText.getText().toString());

            if(matcher.matches()) {
                Log.i("Test","--------Valid Email--------");
            }else {

                Log.i("Test","--------Invalid Email------");
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {

        }

        @Override
        public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {

        } 
    }); 
1
  • Thank you for the reply, but Yuanhai Shi's reply is easier to implement and works perfectly.
    – anonymous
    Oct 2, 2011 at 11:53
0
private boolean validateEmailAddress(CharSequence emailAddress)
{

  if( Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= 8 )
  {
    return android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(emailAddress).matches();
  }

  Pattern pattern;
  Matcher matcher;
  String EMAIL_PATTERN = "^[_A-Za-z0-9-]+(\\.[_A-Za-z0-9-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+(\\.[A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$";
  pattern = Pattern.compile(EMAIL_PATTERN);
  matcher = pattern.matcher(emailAddress);

  return matcher.matches();
}
0

// validate your email address format. Ex-abci@gmail.com

public boolean emailValidator(String email) 
{
    Pattern pattern;
    Matcher matcher;
    final String EMAIL_PATTERN = "^[_A-Za-z0-9-]+(\\.[_A-Za-z0-9-]+)*@[A-Za-z0-9]+(\\.[A-Za-z0-9]+)*(\\.[A-Za-z]{2,})$";
    pattern = Pattern.compile(EMAIL_PATTERN);
    matcher = pattern.matcher(email);
    return matcher.matches();
}

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