5

One of the functionality of the program I develop involves altering the external world (such as modifying files), then launching a process, awaiting its completion then undoing the changes initially made.

These changes can fail in unforeseen ways, in which case we abort everything and undo only what has been done. There are a few changes to be made. This results in the following kind of code:

DoChange1();
try {
    DoChange2();
    try {
        DoChange3();
        try {
            [...]
        }
        finally {
            UndoChange3();
        }
    finally {
        UndoChange2();
    }
finally {
    UndoChange1();
}

This is ugly. This nests for every change, and the code to undo a change is far-away, in opposite order, from the code to apply that change - much like applying group operations to structures in languages where it's done with func(structure, lambda), as opposed to LINQ-style.

Even if organized in function calls, I would much rather be able to do something like that:

DoChange1();
finally_onwards {
    UndoChange1();
}
DoChange2();
finally_onwards {
    UndoChange2();
}
DoChange3();
finally_onwards {
    UndoChange3();
}
[...]

Where a finally becomes active once it's encountered and is called in reverse order of encounter at scope exit.

Sadly this isn't a C# construct - what would be a good solution to prevent try-finallys from nesting to infinity while undoing the changes properly ?

Note that the changes should always be undone. The changes from X affect how [...] goes, but afterwards they should always be reverted.

3
  • ... Reading what I just wrote, I realize that maybe I could use a list of lambdas to which UndoChange1 2 and 3 are appended in order, that gets processed in reverse order in one finally block ? May 27, 2023 at 15:08
  • Do you always want to undo the changes from DoChangeX();, or only sometimes?
    – dbc
    May 27, 2023 at 15:11
  • @dbc Always. The changes from X affect how [...] goes, but afterwards they should always be reverted. May 27, 2023 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

6

If you always are going to undo the changes, I would suggest changing the signatures of the DoChangeX() methods to return an IDisposable that undoes the changes.

For instance, if you introduce the following:

public sealed class UndoDisposable : IDisposable
{
    Action? undo;
    public UndoDisposable(Action undo) => this.undo = undo ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(undo));
    public void Dispose() => Interlocked.Exchange(ref this.undo, null)?.Invoke();
}

You could rewrite your DoChangeX() methods as follows:

public IDisposable DoChange1()
{
    // The code to do change 1
    return new UndoDisposable(() => UndoChange1());
}

void UndoChange1()
{
    // The code to undo change 1
}

Then your main code would look like:

using (DoChange1())
using (DoChange2())
using (DoChange3())
{
    Console.WriteLine("All changes active.");
}

The advantages of this pattern are:

  1. By returning an IDisposable you encourage downstream developers to properly undo the changes via a using statement.

  2. The changes are guaranteed to be undone in reverse order of application.

  3. The knowledge of how to undo each change is encapsulated inside the change method itself.

  4. If some inner "undo" method throws an exception, outer "undo" methods will still get called (which might not be guaranteed if all the undo methods are added to some flat list of lambdas).

Demo fiddle here.

1
  • you can also drop the { ... } from the using block and just use the statement. May 27, 2023 at 15:41
2

You can get very close to your proposed finally_onwards syntax by using the C# using statement with an IDisposable type that encapsulates a cleanup action:

public struct Undo : IDisposable
{
    private readonly Action _action;
    
    public Undo(Action action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }
    
    public void Dispose()
    {
        _action();
    }
}

Sample usage:

Console.WriteLine("DoChange1");
using var undo1 = new Undo(() => { Console.WriteLine("UndoChange1"); });

Console.WriteLine("DoChange2");
using var undo2 = new Undo(() => { Console.WriteLine("UndoChange2"); });

Console.WriteLine("DoChange3");
using var undo3 = new Undo(() => { Console.WriteLine("UndoChange3"); });

Console.WriteLine("...");

Output:

DoChange1
DoChange2
DoChange3
...
UndoChange3
UndoChange2
UndoChange1

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