28

I have created an NSScrollView in interface builder that has a variable number of semi-unique NSViews that can be programmatically added and removed from it. When I add subViews to the documentView, they appear in the lower-left hand corner instead of the upper-left hand corner. I see that you can check the isFlipped bool to figure out if the view's coordinate system is flipped, but I cannot find a way to set it as flipped.

Anyone know what I'm missing?

47

In your NSView subclass, override isFlipped:

isFlipped

A Boolean value indicating whether the view uses a flipped coordinate system.

Declaration

var isFlipped: Bool { get }

Discussion

The default value of this property is false, which results in a non-flipped coordinate system.

[...]

If you want your view to use a flipped coordinate system, override this property and return true.

Source: isFlipped - NSView | Apple Developer Documentation

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  • For those of us who are a little slow, would you spell this out in truncated examples of the .h and .m files? – Carl Carlson Dec 14 '16 at 21:45
  • @CarlCarlson I've added an answer that does just that 🙂 – Ben Leggiero Mar 6 '19 at 16:10
28

For anyone wishing to do this in Swift here's how you override in your custom class:

class FlippedView: NSView {
    override var flipped:Bool {
        get {
            return true
        }
    }
}
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  • 6
    Can you do what without subclassing? – yukas Dec 9 '14 at 22:28
  • 2
    That seems to be so obvious that there should be a way of doing it in the Interface builder without having to resort to subclassing. – iphaaw Aug 4 '15 at 20:28
  • 1
    I don't see any properties for setting this in IB. As for doing it without subclassing, it's a read only property so sub classing is your best bet. – Jay Aug 17 '15 at 12:19
  • @yukas The idea is that each individual view has its own way of drawing itself (for example, using human-calculated vectors) that might get really wonky if you suddenly flip its coordinate plane (rasters might be fine while paths might draw upside-down). So, it's not settable, but subclasses can specify isFlipped because they know how the view is drawn. – Ben Leggiero Nov 1 '17 at 20:38
5

The idea is that each individual view has its own way of drawing itself (for example, using human-calculated paths) that might get really wonky if you suddenly flip its coordinate plane (rasters might be fine while paths might draw upside-down, calculations might place things off-screen, etc.). So it's not settable, but subclasses can specify isFlipped because they should definitely know how the view is drawn.

Subclasses can also make it settable, but then they must expect it to change at any time.

As for code, here's Jay's answer in Swift 5:

open class FlippedView: NSView {
    override var isFlipped: Bool { true }
}
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2

Since Carl Carlson asked, here's Jay's answer in Objective-C:

Header (.h)

@interface XYZFlippedView: NSView

- (BOOL) isFlipped;

@end

Implementation (.m)

@implementation XYZFlippedView

- (BOOL) isFlipped
{
    return YES;
}

@end
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