-2

Let's say we have a class like this:

public class MyClass {

    int Mandatory;
    string Optional;
}

Is there a functional difference between overloading the constructor like this:

public MyClass(int mandatory)
{
    Mandatory = mandatory;
    Optional = "";
}

public MyClass(int mandatory, string optional): this(mandatory)
{
    Optional = optional;
}

and using optional parameters like this:

public MyClass(int mandatory, string optional = "")
{
    Mandatory = mandatory;
    Optional = optional;
}

Question Mark.

Edit: I've seen some related questions about this topic, but they seem to only consider what is more comfortable to implement. What I'm interested in is whether the program will work differently. Like: Are there different ways to call the constructors depending on the chosen implementation? Are there any runtime problems that can arise from one or the other?

4
  • 1
    Please check other questions like softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/368414/… or softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/152878/… first
    – Progman
    Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 9:12
  • You get what you type in. If you use two constructors, you get two different functions that absolutely can behave very differently (simplest example - print different messages depending on which constructor was called). If you use one constructor, you get one function that will behave the same independently of how many arguments you pass (if you omit optional it will still get a value of "" and the constructor will execute the very same commands) Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 9:28
  • Runtime problems? I can only think of an extreme example, if you define either a constructor with 100 arguments or 1 000 000 separate constructors for all variants of those arguments, in the latter case your executable will be much bigger (to store all the function). Also, if you call the constructor of your class very often (like a million times per second), then there might be performance difference. On one hand a constructor with 100 arguments would be costly, if you intend to pass only 1 actual argument and use the default 99 arguments, in this case a separate constructor would be faster Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 9:33
  • On another hand if among those million calls per second you uniformly use different overloads among the 1 000 000 different constructors, you might face frequent misses for the instruction cache - but only benchmarking of performance would tell if this is costly or not Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 9:36

2 Answers 2

1

There's no behavioural difference unless you write the constructors to have different behaviour. It's possible that there's good reason for that, but otherwise overloads should just add to the existing constructors.

There may be reasons to overload rather than use optional parameters. One thing I've seen in code that I didn't like was writing methods with several optional parameters and then having to use naming in the calls to set a subset of the arguments:

public void DoSomething(int required, int optional1 = 0, int optional2 = 0)
{
...
}

...

DoSomething(1, optional2: 3);

I've found that using optional parameters in cases like that usually leads to code that's more difficult to read. To some extent, this has been due to poor code structure in general and methods with many parameters, most or all of which are optional. But even when there are three parameters, if there are several ways the arguments are passed and optional parameters mean having to name the arguments in most calls, I prefer to have overloads.

Regarding the example you gave and what I said about adding, I would structure the overloaded constructors like this:

public BuildIt(int required): this(mandatory, "")
{
}

public BuildIt(int mandatory, string forOptional)
{
    Mandatory = mandatory;
    Optional = forOptional;
}

This reduces the likelihood that someone accidentally modifies behaviour in one of the overloads.

And, of course, you can use init properties if you're able to use a new enough version of C#. They've been around for a while, so there's a good chance that you can. Then you can give the optional properties their default values, but allow changing them at construction time through use of the initialiser block:

public string Optional { get; init; } = "";

...

new BuildIt(1){ Optional = "I want to set a value" };
1

This is mostly a style issue.

There can be some difference in behavior if some application uses different versions of your library at compile time and runtime, and the default value changes. In your first example the value from the runtime version would be used. In the later it would be the compile time version. This is because the value of optional arguments are inserted into the call site. But I would not expect this to be a common problem in practice.

For modern code I would consider using init properties instead of optional constructor parameters:

public class MyClass{
    public string Optional {get; init;}
    public string Required {get;}
    public required string Requiredv2 {get; init;} // C#11 only
    public MyClass(string required) => Required = required;
}

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