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I'm using a label to print 0 to 100 as a part of an progress bar in Qt C++. I use the code below to do it but it executes too fast:

for (i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
{
    data = QString::number(i);
    ui->label_29->setText(data + "%");
}

I tried to use sleep() function but it froze the exe file and it couldn't run. I'm thinking of using a thread but I don't know how.

1
  • 2
    Qt's GUI classes may only be accessed from the main thread (aka the thread that is running QApplication::exec(), so generally speaking using a separate thread for GUI purposes is discouraged. (You could do it, but that thread would only be able to to send events to the main thread to prompt the main thread to call methods on the appropriate GUI objects, so it's usually just easier to use a QTimer or similar in the main thread instead, as @Parisa.H.R suggests below) Jun 5, 2023 at 4:39

2 Answers 2

6

To update the progress bar with a delay between each step without freezing the GUI, you can utilize Qt's QTimer class to schedule the updates at regular intervals.

Here's an example:

#include <QApplication>
#include <QLabel>
#include <QTimer>

class ProgressBarExample : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    ProgressBarExample() : i(0)
    {
        // Create and configure the label
        label = new QLabel();
        label->setAlignment(Qt::AlignCenter);
        label->setFixedSize(200, 30);

        // Create the QTimer object and connect its timeout signal to the updateProgressBar slot
        timer = new QTimer(this);
        connect(timer, &QTimer::timeout, this, &ProgressBarExample::updateProgressBar);

        // Set the desired interval (in milliseconds) between updates
        int interval = 100; // Adjust this value as per your requirement
        timer->setInterval(interval);

        // Start the timer
        timer->start();

        // Show the label
        label->show();
    }

private slots:
    void updateProgressBar()
    {
        if (i > 100) {
            // Stop the timer if the progress reaches 100%
            timer->stop();
            return;
        }

        QString data = QString::number(i);
        label->setText(data + "%");

        i++; // Increment the counter
    }

private:
    QLabel* label;
    QTimer* timer;
    int i;
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication app(argc, argv);

    ProgressBarExample example;

    return app.exec();
}

#include "main.moc"


0

From Qt documentation of QThread:

Managing Threads

Note: wait() and the sleep() functions should be unnecessary in general, since Qt is an event-driven framework. Instead of wait(), consider listening for the finished() signal. Instead of the sleep() functions, consider using QTimer.

QThread::sleep:

Avoid using this function if you need to wait for a given condition to change. Instead, connect a slot to the signal that indicates the change or use an event handler...

And since your goal is:

I'm using a label to print 0 to 100 as a part of a progress bar

Here are 2 ways you can achieve that:

Solution 1:

You can use a QLabel to mimic a progress bar, and make it possible to see it progressing, by using a QTimer, connecting its timeout signal to a lambda that incrementing the value displayed on the label itself.

I used a timeout of 100ms, and I'm looping the progress, you can tweak that to make it stop at a 100 by using QTimer::stop at some condition.

Here's a minimal reproducible example:

#include <QApplication>
#include <QTimer>
#include <QLabel>


int main(int argc,char*argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);

    QLabel *l = new QLabel();
    l->setText("0");
    l->setAlignment(Qt::AlignCenter);

    QTimer *t = new QTimer();

    t->connect(t,&QTimer::timeout,[=]()
    {
        l->setText(QString::number((l->text().toInt()+1)%100));
    });

    t->start(100);

    l->show();

    return a.exec();
}

Here's how it looks:

Label progress

Solution 2:

To display a progress, Qt offers QProgressBar, here's how you can use it in the above solution:

#include <QApplication>
#include <QProgressBar>
#include <QTimer>

int main(int argc,char*argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);

    QProgressBar *p = new QProgressBar();

    p->setRange(0,100);

    p->setValue(0);

    p->setOrientation(Qt::Horizontal);

    QTimer *t = new QTimer();

    t->connect(t,&QTimer::timeout,[=]()
    {
        p->setValue((p->value()+1)%p->maximum());
    });

    t->start(100);

    p->show();

    return a.exec();
}

Here's how it looks:

enter image description here

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