5

I have a simple loop that just sums the second row of a numpy array. In numba I need only do:

from numba import njit
@njit('float64(float64[:, ::1])', fastmath=True)
    def fast_sum_nb(array_2d):
        s = 0.0
        for i in range(array_2d.shape[1]):
            s += array_2d[1, i]
        return s

If I time the code I get:

In [3]: import numpy as np
In [4]: A = np.random.rand(2, 1000)
In [5]: %timeit fast_sum_nb(A)
305 ns ± 7.81 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1,000,000 loops each)

To do the same thing in cython I need first make setup.py which has:

from setuptools import setup
from Cython.Build import cythonize
from setuptools.extension import Extension

ext_modules = [
    Extension(
        'test_sum',
        language='c',
        sources=['test.pyx'],  # list of source files
        extra_compile_args=['-Ofast', '-march=native'],  # example extra compiler arguments
    )
]

setup(
    name = "test module",
    ext_modules = cythonize(ext_modules, compiler_directives={'language_level' : "3"})  
)

I have the highest possible compilation options. The cython summation code is then:

#cython: language_level=3
from cython cimport boundscheck
from cython cimport wraparound
@boundscheck(False)
@wraparound(False)
def fast_sum(double[:, ::1] arr):
    cdef int i=0
    cdef double s=0.0
    for i in range(arr.shape[1]):
        s += arr[1, i]
    return s

I compile it with:

python setup.py build_ext --inplace

If I now time this I get:

In [2]: import numpy as np
In [3]: A = np.random.rand(2, 1000)
In [4]: %timeit fast_sum(A)
564 ns ± 1.25 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1,000,000 loops each)

Why is the cython version so much slower?


The annotated C code from cython looks like this:

enter image description here

The assembly produced by numba seems to be:

vaddpd  -96(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm0, %ymm0
vaddpd  -64(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm1, %ymm1
vaddpd  -32(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm2, %ymm2
vaddpd  (%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm3, %ymm3
addq    $16, %rdx
cmpq    %rdx, %rcx
jne .LBB0_5
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm1, %ymm0
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm2, %ymm0
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm3, %ymm0
vextractf128    $1, %ymm0, %xmm1
vaddpd  %xmm1, %xmm0, %xmm0
vpermilpd   $1, %xmm0, %xmm1
vaddsd  %xmm1, %xmm0, %xmm0

I don't know how to get the assembly for the cython code. The C file it produces is huge and the .so file disassembles to a large file as well.

This speed difference persists (in fact it increases) if I increase the number of columns in the 2d array so it doesn't seem to be a calling overhead issue.

I am using Cython version 0.29.35 and numba version 0.57.0 on Ubuntu.

4
  • @MrFooz The code change didn't make any difference to the timings. Does it change things for you? The difference is even larger if I make the array 2 by 10,000. numba is about 1 microsecond and cython about 3.9.
    – Simd
    Jun 5, 2023 at 15:04
  • @MrFooz Do you mean the generated C code or the assembly?
    – Simd
    Jun 5, 2023 at 15:18
  • @MrFooz I added the C code. I am not sure it tells me anything.
    – Simd
    Jun 5, 2023 at 15:24
  • I deleted my prior comments since they were leading us in the wrong direction.
    – Mr Fooz
    Jun 5, 2023 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

8

It looks like

decorated py code  --Numba-->  LLVM IR  --LLVM-->  machine code 

is just producing better-optimized code than

cython code  --Cython-->  C  --gcc-or-clang-->  machine code

There are three things that conspire to give Cython worse performance in this benchmark.

  1. Cython overhead (minor)

  2. The loop Cython generates (major)

  3. Which compiler is being used (major)

Overhead (reason 1)

Cython apparently has some extra overhead. You can observe this by passing in an array of shape (1,0). The Numba function is still much faster. This isn't too surprising, given that Cython is the more general tool, and it tries to be extra careful with inputs, error handling, etc., even when it's overkill. Unless you're calling this function a lot with very small inputs, this shouldn't matter much.

Loop Unrolling (reasons 2 & 3 together)

Based on the disassembly in the updated question (copied here), Numba + LLVM are creating a nicely unrolled loop. Notice how it's using YMM0..YMM3, not just one vector register.

vaddpd  -96(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm0, %ymm0
vaddpd  -64(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm1, %ymm1
vaddpd  -32(%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm2, %ymm2
vaddpd  (%rsi,%rdx,8), %ymm3, %ymm3
addq    $16, %rdx
cmpq    %rdx, %rcx
jne .LBB0_5
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm1, %ymm0
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm2, %ymm0
vaddpd  %ymm0, %ymm3, %ymm0
vextractf128    $1, %ymm0, %xmm1
vaddpd  %xmm1, %xmm0, %xmm0
vpermilpd   $1, %xmm0, %xmm1
vaddsd  %xmm1, %xmm0, %xmm0

In contrast, here's core decompiled loop from Cython when using gcc. There's no unrolling here.

    do {
      uVar9 = uVar8 + 1;
      auVar15 = vaddpd_avx(auVar15,*(undefined (*) [32])(local_118 + local_d0 + uVar8 * 0x20));
      uVar8 = uVar9;
    } while (uVar9 < (ulong)local_108 >> 2);

The decompilation of the clang output is similar, but happens to perform even worse (see the benchmark results below). For some reason, clang doesn't want to unroll Cython's loop.

    do {
        auVar1._8_8_ = 0;
        auVar1._0_8_ = *(ulong *)(local_e8.data + lVar4 * 8 + local_e8.strides[0]);
        auVar5 = vaddsd_avx(auVar5,auVar1);
        lVar4 = (long)((int)lVar4 + 1);
    } while (lVar4 < local_e8.shape[1]);

Making Cython Fast

It can sometimes be tricky to make Cython generate ultra-fast code, but fortunately there's another option: use Cython only for glue between Python and C.

Try putting this in your .pyx file:

cdef extern from "impl.h":
    double fast_sum_c(double[] x, size_t n) nogil

def fast_sum_cyc(double[:, ::1] arr):
    # The pointer retrieval is only safe 
    # because of the "::1" constraint.
    return fast_sum_c(&arr[1, 0], arr.shape[1])

and then create an impl.h file with the following contents:

#pragma once

double fast_sum_c(double const *x, size_t n) {
    double s = 0.0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        s += x[i];
    }
    return s;
}

On my machine, with a (2,1000) input array, here are the timeit runtimes:

Compiler    Numba  OrigCy  CyAndC
----------  -----  ------  ------
LLVM/Clang  240ns   900ns   250ns
gcc         n/a     380ns   380ns

Observations:

  • Numba has a little lower overhead than Cython.

  • Cython + Clang performs exceptionally poorly on this benchmark.

  • ...but a thin Cython wrapper + hand written C code + Clang is almost as good as Numba.

  • GCC doesn't seem as sensitive to the code Cython generates. We get the same speed with Cython's code and hand written code.

Here's the most important assembly snippet from the clang-compiled version of fast_sum_c. Unsurprisingly, it's very similar to what Numba produced (since they both use LLVM as their backend):

58b0:       c5 fd 58 04 cf          vaddpd (%rdi,%rcx,8),%ymm0,%ymm0
58b5:       c5 f5 58 4c cf 20       vaddpd 0x20(%rdi,%rcx,8),%ymm1,%ymm1
58bb:       c5 ed 58 54 cf 40       vaddpd 0x40(%rdi,%rcx,8),%ymm2,%ymm2
58c1:       c5 e5 58 5c cf 60       vaddpd 0x60(%rdi,%rcx,8),%ymm3,%ymm3
58c7:       48 83 c1 10             add    $0x10,%rcx
58cb:       48 39 c8                cmp    %rcx,%rax
58ce:       75 e0                   jne    58b0 <fast_sum_c+0x40>
58d0:       c5 f5 58 c0             vaddpd %ymm0,%ymm1,%ymm0
58d4:       c5 ed 58 c0             vaddpd %ymm0,%ymm2,%ymm0
58d8:       c5 e5 58 c0             vaddpd %ymm0,%ymm3,%ymm0
58dc:       c4 e3 7d 19 c1 01       vextractf128 $0x1,%ymm0,%xmm1
58e2:       c5 f9 58 c1             vaddpd %xmm1,%xmm0,%xmm0
58e6:       c4 e3 79 05 c8 01       vpermilpd $0x1,%xmm0,%xmm1
58ec:       c5 fb 58 c1             vaddsd %xmm1,%xmm0,%xmm0

Notes

  • Compiler options to encourage more loop unrolling didn't help. In the "Making Cython Fast", I tried adding various pragmas and compiler flags to gcc to encourage it to do some unrolling; nothing helped. Additionally, clang never had trouble with my hand written C code, but never wanted to unroll the Cython-generated loop.

  • objdump -d test_sum.*.so produces a disassembly. Looking for the vaddpd instructions helps with locating the loop of interest.

  • Ghidra can be used to decompile the code. This helps a little with understanding it. Compiling the extension module with -g and -gdwarf-4 makes it so Ghidra's DWARF decoding works, injecting a bit more metadata in the decompilation.

  • For these tests, I used clang 14.0.0 and gcc 11.3.0.

7
  • Is there any way to produce equally fast code with cython?
    – Simd
    Jun 5, 2023 at 18:25
  • 1
    I added a new section showing how to implement the important code in C and use Cython as just a glue layer. In practice, this is the approach I find works the best: use Cython to convert inputs into C types, allocate memory for the results (not applicable here), then let real C or C++ code do all the hard work.
    – Mr Fooz
    Jun 5, 2023 at 18:58
  • "This is not super-surprising since Numba is specifically designed for code like this, whereas Cython is also a more general tool." This is not the issue. In fact, you shown that the problem is Clang VS GCC. This is a common issue. GCC tends not to vectorize loops while Clang really love doing aggressive unrolling. Unrolling is critical for performance due to the latency of the FMA units. Thus, GCC just produce an inefficient code due to a bad backend SIMD/ASM optimizer. Jun 5, 2023 at 19:57
  • In C, one option is to manually tell GCC to unroll the loop with something like #pragma GCC unroll 8 but the GCC unrolling optimization is really dumb. It just copy-past the code N times without taking care about dependencies so the produced assembly code is still very inefficient because of a long instruction dependency chain. Meanwhile, Clang is able to break the chain and use a tree reduction instead. Such a problem is pretty critical since it impacts Numpy, HPC programs, etc. Numpy sometimes uses a manual unrolling as a workaround. Sad this problem is still not fixed for >5 years... Jun 5, 2023 at 20:03
  • 1
    @MrFooz #pragma GCC ivdep should not be used here because of the reduction (iterations are not independent). Regarding Clang, you are right : there is unfortunately another missed optimization (ie. ~ optimizer bug) to consider. In the end, there is 3 missed optimizations on a very basic array sum reduction... Sad. I made an answer to describe more precisely such issues. Jun 6, 2023 at 1:29
6

TL;DR: this answer adds additional details on top of the good answer of @MrFooz so to understand why the Cython code is slow with both Clang and GCC. The performance issue is coming from a combination of 3 missed optimizations : one from Clang, one from GCC and one from Cython...


Under the hood

First of all, Cython generates a C code with a stride not known at compile time. This is a problem since auto-vectorized of compilers cannot easily vectorize the code using SIMD instruction as the array could theoretically not be contiguous (even though it will always be in practice). As a result, the Clang auto-vectorizer fail to optimize the loop (both auto-vectorization and unrolling). The GCC optimizer is a bit more clever : it generate a specialized vectorized code for a stride of 1 (ie. contiguous arrays). Here is the generated Cython code:

  for (__pyx_t_3 = 0; __pyx_t_3 < __pyx_t_2; __pyx_t_3+=1) {
    __pyx_v_i = __pyx_t_3;
    __pyx_t_4 = 1;
    __pyx_t_5 = __pyx_v_i;
    __pyx_v_s = (__pyx_v_s + (*((double *) ( /* dim=1 */ ((char *) (((double *) ( /* dim=0 */ (__pyx_v_arr.data + __pyx_t_4 * __pyx_v_arr.strides[0]) )) + __pyx_t_5)) ))));
  }

Note the __pyx_v_arr.strides[0] which is not replaced by 1 at compile time while Cython is supposed to know the array is contiguous. There is a workaround for this Cython missed-optimization : using 1D memory-views.

Here is the modified Cython code:

#cython: language_level=3
from cython cimport boundscheck
from cython cimport wraparound
@boundscheck(False)
@wraparound(False)
def fast_sum(double[:, ::1] arr):
    cdef int i=0
    cdef double s=0.0
    cdef double[::1] line = arr[1]
    for i in range(arr.shape[1]):
        s += line[i]
    return s

This code is unfortunately not faster because of two underlying compiler issues...

GCC does not unroll such a loop yet by default. This is a well-known long-standing missed optimization. In fact, there is even an open issue for this specific C code. Using the compilation flags -funroll-loops -fvariable-expansion-in-unroller helps to improve the resulting performance though the generated code is still not perfect.

When it comes to Clang, this is another missed optimization preventing the code to be fast. GCC and Clang had several open issues in the past related to missed auto-vectorization when using types of different size in loop to be vectorized (and even with signed/unsigned for GCC). To fix this issue, you should use 64-bit integers when using double-precision arrays. Here is the final modified Cython code:

#cython: language_level=3
from cython cimport boundscheck
from cython cimport wraparound
@boundscheck(False)
@wraparound(False)
def fast_sum(double[:, ::1] arr):
    cdef long i=0
    cdef double s=0.0
    cdef double[::1] line = arr[1]
    for i in range(arr.shape[1]):
        s += line[i]
    return s

Note that Numba use 64-bit integers by default (eg. for loop iterators and indices) and Numba use LLVM-Lite (based on LLVM, like Clang) so such a problem does not happen here.


Benchmark

Here are performance results on my machine with a i5-9600KF processor, GCC 12.2.0, Clang 14.0.6 and Python 3.11:

Initial code:
    Cython GCC:      389 ns
    Cython Clang:   1050 ns
    Numba:           232 ns

Modified code:
    Cython GCC:      276 ns
    Cython Clang:    242 ns

The very small overhead between Numba and Cython+Clang is due to different startup overheads. Generally, such a small time should not be an issue since one should not call Cython/Numba functions from CPython a lot of time. In such a pathological situation, the caller function should also be modified to use Cython/Numba. When this is not possible nether Numba nor Cython will produce a fast code, so lower-level C extension should be preferred instead.

5
  • Thank you for this. Your final modified cython code is no faster for me using gcc 11.3.0. Using clang 14.0 it is almost as fast as numba however using your final modified cython code.
    – Simd
    Jun 6, 2023 at 13:11
  • Note that this is not the Cython code that matters for GCC but "using the compilation flags -funroll-loops -fvariable-expansion-in-unroller" as specified in the answer. Did you changed them in the setup.py file? (note that such flags are apparently specific to GCC because I got issues with Clang while using them) Jun 6, 2023 at 15:40
  • That gets the timing down to 410ns. Definitely an improvement but still far from the numba timings.
    – Simd
    Jun 6, 2023 at 18:14
  • Yes but this is certainly the best you can get with GCC. No GCC developer provided a better solution so far. The bug needs to be solve but this will certainly take several years because it has been opened 7 years ago and it is not even yet assigned to anyone. You cannot even do the unrolling yourself because GCC detect the pattern and remove your optimization so to generate a less efficient code instead..... Besides, Clang also have a bug causing the loop to be also poorly optimized in this case. I opened a bug a long time ago for this but it looks like this is not an issue for developers... Jun 6, 2023 at 20:04
  • Interestingly, using your final modified cython code, clang manages to be almost as fast as numba. It is really gcc that is lagging behind.
    – Simd
    Jun 6, 2023 at 20:14

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