226

I have the results of a division and I wish to discard the decimal portion of the resultant number.

How can I do this?

14 Answers 14

400

You could use...

...dependent on how you wanted to remove the decimal.

Math.trunc() isn't supported on all platforms yet (namely IE), but you could easily use a polyfill in the meantime.

Another method of truncating the fractional portion with excellent platform support is by using a bitwise operator (.e.g |0). The side-effect of using a bitwise operator on a number is it will treat its operand as a signed 32bit integer, therefore removing the fractional component. Keep in mind this will also mangle numbers larger than 32 bits.


You may also be talking about the inaccuracy of decimal rounding with floating point arithmetic.

Required Reading - What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic.

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  • 30
    Keep in mind that Math.floor() will increase numerical value when number is negative. Thus Math.floor(-1.2) -> -2 whilst Math.floor(1.2) -> 1. parseInt(-1.2) -> -1 (as mentioned by @FloydPink) will discard decimal part as expected for both positive and negative numbers. – Paul T. Rawkeen Nov 6 '14 at 9:53
  • 1
    @PaulT.Rawkeen You could also use a bitwise operator to drop the decimal part, but keep in mind it also truncates to 32 bits. – alex Nov 6 '14 at 22:17
  • 2
    the following shows this answer is unstable:> (2.305*100)|0 > 230 > (2.3*100)|0 > 229 – Jake Feb 18 '16 at 8:28
  • 4
    @Jake The result of 2.3*100 in javascript is 229.99999999999997, so it seems the bitwise operator is doing its job correctly in your example. – Chad von Nau Apr 1 '16 at 0:28
  • Is there a similar solution to |0 that uses 64bit integers? – Clint Apr 12 '17 at 23:10
53

You can also use bitwise operators to truncate the decimal.

e.g.

var x = 9 / 2;
console.log(x); // 4.5

x = ~~x;
console.log(x); // 4

x = -3.7
console.log(~~x) // -3
console.log(x | 0) // -3
console.log(x << 0) // -3

Bitwise operations are considerably more efficient than the Math functions. The double not bitwise operator also seems to slightly outperform the x | 0 and x << 0 bitwise operations by a negligible amount.

// 952 milliseconds
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    (i * 0.5) | 0;
}

// 1150 milliseconds
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    (i * 0.5) << 0;
}

// 1284 milliseconds
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    Math.trunc(i * 0.5);
}

// 939 milliseconds
for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
    ~~(i * 0.5);
}

Also worth noting is that the bitwise not operator takes precedence over arithmetic operations, so you may need to surround calculations with parentheses to have the intended result:

x = -3.7

console.log(~~x * 2) // -6
console.log(x * 2 | 0) // -7
console.log(x * 2 << 0) // -7

console.log(~~(x * 2)) // -7
console.log(x * 2 | 0) // -7
console.log(x * 2 << 0) // -7

More info about the double bitwise not operator can be found at Double bitwise NOT (~~)

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  • 2
    Might be marginally efficient. But, i would suggest 'Math' functions, as its more readable. – ashipj Feb 26 '17 at 15:17
  • Chances are that this doesn't work if the integer isn't represented as 32-bit signed integers (stackoverflow.com/a/7488075/3655192) – Hiroki Nov 18 '17 at 6:40
31

You could also do

parseInt(a/b)
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  • 17
    Note that parseInt won't work reliably for large numbers, because it works by first converting its argument to a string, and for large numbers the result will use exponential notation. For example: var n = 22222222222222222222222; parseInt(n); will return 2, because n.toString() returns 2.2222222222222223e+22. – user5294349 Oct 27 '15 at 11:00
  • 2
    It's also not using parseInt() for its purpose, which is to take a number in a string and return a Number. – alex Jan 18 '16 at 16:01
23

u can also show a certain number of digit after decimal point(here 2 digits) using following code :

var num = (15.46974).toFixed(2)
console.log(num) // 15.47
console.log(typeof num) // string

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13

Use Math.round() function.

Math.round(65.98) // will return 66 
Math.round(65.28) // will return 65
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  • 17
    For completeness, this is plain JavaScript, not query. – Dave Newton Mar 31 '13 at 20:11
  • 1
    $.round = Math.round ;) – alex Mar 7 '14 at 0:45
12

Use Math.round().

(Alex's answer is better; I made an assumption :)

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6

With ES2015, Math.trunc() is available.

Math.trunc(2.3)                       // 2
Math.trunc(-2.3)                      // -2
Math.trunc(22222222222222222222222.3) // 2.2222222222222223e+22
Math.trunc("2.3")                     // 2
Math.trunc("two")                     // NaN
Math.trunc(NaN)                       // NaN

It's not supported in IE11 or below, but does work in Edge and every other modern browser.

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  • 2
    Know of any variations that allow to truncate to X decimal places? Would it be naive to think that Math.trunc(value * Math.pow(10,x)) / Math.pow(10,x) would work? – jamiebarrow Apr 21 '16 at 15:19
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    Hey Jamie, it looks like that would work for most cases, but it's susceptible to floating point gotchas. e.g. value = 2.3 and x = 2 will return 2.29. I don't have a better suggestion. – Chad von Nau Apr 23 '16 at 19:42
  • This to me sounds like the right answer. No rounding upper or lower. No problems with negative numbers. Just discard the decimal. As the question asked for. – Enrique Moreno Tent Nov 22 '16 at 9:39
6

For Example:

var x = 9.656;
x.toFixed(0);           // returns 10
x.toFixed(2);           // returns 9.66
x.toFixed(4);           // returns 9.6560
x.toFixed(6);           // returns 9.656000 

or

parseInt("10");         // returns 10
parseInt("10.33");      // returns 10
parseInt("10 20 30");   // returns 10
parseInt("10 years");   // returns 10
parseInt("years 10");   // returns NaN  
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  • I don't see why this answer doesn't have any kudos, it works for me and it's integrated into the react / JavaScript standards – cwiggo Jun 30 at 9:07
2

If you don't care about rouding, just convert the number to a string, then remove everything after the period including the period. This works whether there is a decimal or not.

const sEpoch = ((+new Date()) / 1000).toString();
const formattedEpoch = sEpoch.split('.')[0];
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1

toFixed will behave like round.

For a floor like behavior use %:

var num = 3.834234;
var floored_num = num - (num % 1); // floored_num will be 3
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  • 2
    Why do you feel this is better than using Math.floor? Your solution seems unnecessarily complex, and slow. I do not know how Math.floor works, but I expect it to be a lot more optimized. Also, I wonder if your solution might give suffer from floating point rounding errors. – Hans Roerdinkholder Feb 10 '16 at 13:57
1

Here is the compressive in detailed explanation with the help of above posts:

1. Math.trunc() : It is used to remove those digits which are followed by dot. It converts implicitly. But, not supported in IE.

Example:

Math.trunc(10.5) // 10

Math.trunc(-10.5) // -10

Other Alternative way: Use of bitwise not operator:

Example:

x= 5.5

~~x // 5

2. Math.floor() : It is used to give the minimum integer value posiible. It is supported in all browsers.

Example:

Math.floor(10.5) // 10

Math.floor( -10.5) // -11

3. Math.ceil() : It is used to give the highest integer value possible. It is supported in all browsers.

Example:

Math.ceil(10.5) // 11

Math.ceil(-10.5) // -10

4. Math.round() : It is rounded to the nearest integer. It is supported in all browsers.

Example:

Math.round(10.5) // 11

Math.round(-10.5)// -10

Math.round(10.49) // 10

Math.round(-10.51) // -11

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0

For an ES6 implementation, use something like the following:

const millisToMinutesAndSeconds = (millis) => {
  const minutes = Math.floor(millis / 60000);
  const seconds = ((millis % 60000) / 1000).toFixed(0);
  return `${minutes}:${seconds < 10 ? '0' : ''}${seconds}`;
}
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0

This is for those who want to prevent users to enter decimal numbers

<input id="myInput" onkeyup="doSomething()" type="number" />

<script>
    function doSomething() {

        var intNum = $('#myInput').val();

        if (!Number.isInteger(intNum)) {
            intNum = Math.round(intNum);
        }

        console.log(intNum);
    }
</script>
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0

You can use .toFixed(0) to remove complete decimal part or provide the number in arguments upto which you want decimal to be truncated.

Note: toFixed will convert the number to string.

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