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After login, i can't access the redirect page (home.html). The page is not found, because I misspelled the urlpatterns of the home page. I'm new to Django.

In urlpatterns work fine correctly: index page, login page and logout page. But the home page doesn't. I believe the problem is the urlpatterns of the home. The page is located at templates/app1/home.html

Project/urls.py

from django.contrib import admin
from django.urls import path, include

urlpatterns = [
    path('admin/', admin.site.urls),
    path('', include('app1.urls'))

App/urls.py

from django.urls import path, include
from . import views
from app1.views import index
from app1 import views

urlpatterns = [
    path('', index, name='index'),
    path('login/', views.sign_in, name='login'),
    path('logout/', views.sign_out, name='logout'),

    path('home/', views, name='home'), #ERROR HERE???
 ]

In views.py I don't have any home related functions. I only have the login/logout functions working correctly.

How can I display the home correctly?

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  • well where is index originating from then? Exactly what view should be triggered when visiting home/? Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:12
  • @Willem VO supports mod strike index and home are two different pages. index is displayed correctly. As soon as I open the site there is the index.html page. I click on Login and the login.html page opens. After logging in (ONLY after logging in), the home.html page should open. home would be the secure page that a user can see only after successful login. So when I visit home, views home should open. The problem is after login, the home page is not found Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:19
  • But you use the views module here, not a real view, that should be some function that maps requests to responses. Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:21
  • @Willem VO supports mod strike I'm new to Django, that's why I have such trivial problems. All I would like is to display home correctly after login. I accept any different way. So should I create a function to call home.html? Could you show me the code please? Of course, in views.py I already have the login and logout functions (copied from a tutorial) which redirect to home. Thank you Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

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Well you need a view. A view is a function that turns a HTTP request (passed as a parameter) into a response (what you return in the function). So you can make a home view:

# app1/views.py

from django.contrib.auth.decorators import login_required


@login_required
def home(request):
    return render(request, 'app1/home.html')

and make the template in app1/templates/app1/home.html. The @login_required decorator [Django-doc] will ensure only logged in users can visit the view.

In the urls.py, you can link this to the home view:

from app1 import views
from django.urls import include, path

urlpatterns = [
    path('', views.index, name='index'),
    path('login/', views.sign_in, name='login'),
    path('logout/', views.sign_out, name='logout'),
    path('home/', views.home, name='home'),
]

I already have the login and logout functions (copied from a tutorial) which redirect to home.

Please don't copy. Following templates makes a lot of sense, just copying what tutorials say however is likely one of the worst ways to get used to a framework. It takes a lot of skill from the tutor to explains how something works, but it is often worth it. You probably do not need to write views to log in or log out anyway. Indeed, Django has builtin views to login and logout. You can work with:

from app1 import views
from django.contrib.auth.views import LoginView, LogoutView
from django.urls import include, path, reverse_lazy

urlpatterns = [
    path('', views.index, name='index'),
    path(
        'login/', LoginView.as_view(next_page=reverse_lazy('home')), name='login'
    ),
    path('logout/', LogoutView.as_view(), name='logout'),
    path('home/', views.home, name='home'),
]

you can further customize these with a custom template, etc. In very rare cases, you might want to implement a custom login view, but that is for most vanilla web applications, not necessary at all. A web framework normally aims to let programmers develop an application as fast as possible, so having to copy a lot of code for standard use cases, makes not a lot of sense.

5
  • Works! Thank you. The solution was simple. I sensed it was something similar, I approached it, but I didn't solve it. I still have so much to learn. Thanks for the help. As login I use this code (I took a screenshot on imgbb): ibb.co/Zg1NsX3 Little curiosity: what is the difference between my login code and yours? Thank you Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:57
  • @Folidexman: I didn't write any view, so you can then remove the sign_in and sign_out views. These views are provided by Django itself, and thus likely tested (more) rigously, and thus less prone to bugs, security vulnerabilities, etc. Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 20:59
  • I was wrong, sorry. I was referring to the code inside urlpatterns. I see you used login/', LoginView.as_view(next_page=reverse_lazy('home')), name='login' and then path('logout/', LogoutView.as_view(), name='logout'). What is the difference between path('login/', views.sign_in, name='login') and path('logout/', views.sign_out, name='logout')? Thank you Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 21:04
  • @Folidexman: we impor the LoginView and LogoutView from django.contrib.auth.views, these are thus, views defined in the Django framework itself, so we link to these, not the ones in app1. Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 21:06
  • Ah okay, got it. I will elaborate on this or at the most I will open another question. I used Login/Logout following this tutorial: pythontutorial.net/django-tutorial/django-login Not good? Isn't it a good idea to use this? Is it a bad solution? Could you explain the reason to me please? Intato I upvoted and accepted your answer and thank you Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 21:13

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