4

my controllers use 2 or more services. In turn, my services construct and consume their own instance of a Unit of Work class (with access to the repositories).

I would like my services to share a same Unit of Work instance, and make it unit-testable. My questions are:

  1. Should I inject the Unit of Work and services to my controllers?
  2. I would need to inject the Unit of Work to my services as well. Where should I do that? Thank you so much.
5

1) I dont think injecting Unit of Work in UI controller is a good idea, try to separate the logic and transaction from the UI.

2) Yes you can inject UoW in your service preferable as a constructor injected through IoC container. some people design it to be a static factory but i prefer use it as parameter injected in constructor

public class MyService : IMyService
{
  IUnitOfWork _unitOfWork;

  public MyService(IUnitOfWork uow)
  {
    _unitOfWork = uow;
  }

  public void DoSomeOperation(SampleParam param)
  {
    _unitOfWork.BeginTrx();
    //  do some work 
    _unitOfWork.Commit();
  }
}

or using static factory

public class MyService : IMyService
{
  public void DoSomeOperation(SampleParam param)
  {
    using(UnitOfWork.Start())
    {
      //  do some work 
    }
  }
}
  • 2
    I have the same problem with managing the unit of work in the service as I do with managing it in the repository, which is that you now cannot easily tie multiple service calls together into a transaction, and a failure causes the data to be left in a strange state. This gets even more complicated if a service needs to call another service. I think the best solution is to leave managing of the UoW to the application/ui layer 99% of the time. The other 1% where you need fine grained control over a complicated process, this works fine, but it's the exception, not the norm. – Brook Oct 4 '11 at 21:24
  • I agree with Brook. A Service Layer should be reusable and agnostic to the app consuming it. When you put the UoW in the Service Layer, you're dictating the UoW scope for the consuming application also. Consider a desktop app that allows you to maintain data for multiple entities on the same form. When you click "Save" the app calls 4 or 5 service methods before committing the UoW. A slimmer UI to edit a smaller subset of the same data on a mobile app, for example, would not be able to reuse the service layer code if the UoW lives at the Service Layer. – ctorx Aug 23 '13 at 20:01
7

I like to combine DI with an action filter, this way the container can managed the scope of the unit of work, but begin/commit/rollback are called for you automatically and you don't have to fuss with that on every action.

This is a bit tricky, because normally, actionfilters are NOT re-instantiated per request, so when you have a dependency that you DO want to be per request (the unit of work) you need to work some magic.

Here is how I do this using Ninject, and Ninject.Web.Mvc

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
    public class UnitOfWorkAction : Attribute
    {
    }

    public class UnitOfWorkActionFilter : IActionFilter
    {
        private IUnitOfWork _unitOfWork;

        public UnitOfWorkActionFilter(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
        {
            _unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
        }

        public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            _unitOfWork.Begin();
        }

        public void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
        {
            if (filterContext.Exception == null)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        _unitOfWork.Commit();
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        _unitOfWork.Rollback();
                        throw;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    _unitOfWork.Rollback();
                }
        }
    }

I then configure how the attribute should be used in the App_Start/NinjectMVC3.cs

kernel.BindFilter<UnitOfWorkActionFilter>(FilterScope.Action, 0)
                .WhenActionMethodHas<UnitOfWorkAction>();
//also make sure your IUnitOfWork is bound per request, obviously

And finally, an example Action

[UnitOfWorkAction]
public ActionResult SomeAction(int id)
{
     //invoke your services here, and the uow will be automatically committed or rolled back when the action returns
 }

Also worth noting is that this approach lets you do constructor injection of dependencies to your action filter, rather than just property injection, which I very much prefer.

2

I like Mohamed Abed's answer, I haven't gotten enough points yet to add a comment to his post so I will just try to mention that in these cases you need to make sure the the Unit of Work is marked as a single instance or it will not be shared between the services.

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