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Maybe I made a mistake. If so, I am sorry to ask this.

I want to calculate Pearson's correlation coefficent by using scipy's pearsonr function.

from scipy.stats.stats import pearsonr

X = [4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4]
Y = [4, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4]

pearsonr(X, Y)

I get an error below

RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in double_scalars ###

The reason why I get an error is E[X] = 4 (Excepted Value of X is 4)

I look at the code of pearsonr function in scpy.stats.stats.py. Some part of the pearsonr function is as follows.

mx = x.mean() # which is 4
my = y.mean() # not necessary
xm, ym = x-mx, y-my # xm = [0 0 0 0 0 0]
r_num = n*(np.add.reduce(xm*ym)) #r_num = 0, because xm*ym 1x6 Zero Vector.
r_den = n*np.sqrt(ss(xm)*ss(ym)) #r_den = 0
r = (r_num / r_den) # Invalid value encountered in double_scalars

At the end, pearsonr returns (nan, 1.0)

Should pearsonr return (0, 1.0)?

I think if a vector has same value for every row/column, covariance should be zero. Thus Pearson's Correleation Coefficient should also be zero by the definition of PCC.

Pearson's correlation coefficient between two variables is defined as the covariance of the two variables divided by the product of their standard deviations.

Is it bug or where do I make a mistake?

1 Answer 1

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Pearson's correlation coefficient between two variables is defined as the covariance of the two variables divided by the product of their standard deviations.

So it's the covariance over

  • the standard deviation of [4, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4] times
  • the standard deviation of [4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4].

The standard deviation of [4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4] is zero.

So it's the covariance over

  • the standard deviation of [4, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4] times
  • zero.

So it's the covariance over

  • zero.

Anything divided by zero is nan. The value of the covariance is irrelevant.

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  • thanks. Yes 0/0 would be nan but Pearson's Correlation Coefficient would be from -1 to 1. Assume, you make a recommendation and these are the ratings. I think pearsonr return 0 rather than NaN.
    – Baskaya
    Oct 4, 2011 at 21:15
  • 3
    @Thorn: The existence of Pearson's r is not guaranteed to be defined.
    – unutbu
    Oct 4, 2011 at 21:19
  • @unutbu Thanks. Yes, you are right. I have just seen this. But... I am not happy. Thanks again guys.
    – Baskaya
    Oct 4, 2011 at 21:27
  • @Thorn If the definition you posted is right, then if the standard deviation of either variable is zero, then the correlation coefficient is undefined. (I do actually have an Economics degree, and took plenty of Econometrics and Statistics. But none of that is necessary to understand this -- it follows from the definition with simple arithmetic when either standard deviation is zero).
    – agf
    Oct 4, 2011 at 21:28
  • @agf Right. No need to Economics or Maths I think for this one. I think this way. If there is no pattern with random variable X (because it is constant), so cov(X, ANY_RANDOM_VARIABLE) equals zero. I interpret (wrongly) that it is enough to say PCC also should be zero intuitively.
    – Baskaya
    Oct 4, 2011 at 21:39

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